99

I had this same issue. I enabled workspace from Appearance → Behavior, and also tried using Ubuntu Tweak, but no go on the keyboard shortcuts, even though all the defaults were there. I then opened CCSM to make sure that the Desktop Wall was enabled. In my case it wasn't, and as soon as I enabled it, my keyboard shortcuts started working again.


71

The new keybinding you define in 'Settings-->Keyboard-->Shortcuts-->Navigation' will get appended to the previous/default one. It will become, for example. gsettings get org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings switch-to-workspace-down ['<Primary><Shift>Down', '<Control><Alt>Down'] I managed to remove the default keybinding using the ...


41

Alt+Enter does the trick hope it helps you


28

This is the default behavior of GNOME-Shell, which is included in Ubuntu 17.10 and up (in contrast to Ubuntu 17.04, which still included Ubuntu's own creation, Unity). You can change this using the gnome-tweak-tool, which you can install via sudo apt install gnome-tweak-tool. It offers many additional settings to modify the behavior of the GNOME-Shell. The ...


26

The only way I have found to modify the keyboard shortcuts for workspaces 5 and up in GNOME Flashback, is through a shell using the dconf command. $ dconf read /org/gnome/desktop/wm/keybindings/switch-to-workspace-1 ['<Primary>F1'] Here I read the shortcut setting for the first workspace, to get an idea about the syntax to use when setting values for ...


23

Recommended extensions for 3.32+: Workspace Matrix. Workspace Grid is currently not being updated, but the developer instead recommends Workspace Matrix. Workspace Matrix has nice previews of the workspaces in the displayed switcher and a lot of tweakable options. It holds the same benefits over Frippery Panel as Workspace Grid did (see below). For 3.20: ...


23

Do you mean gnome-session-flashback instead of gnome classic ? If yes, you can do that by installing the compizconfig settings manager and plugins packages, i.e. sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager compiz-plugins You need to start the compizconfig settings manager found under Appications -> System Tools -> Preferences Once loaded, click on ...


22

The option to install GNOME extensions using GNOME Tweaks is removed from last few versions of the application. But you can simply install and manage extensions from their official websites. To do that first install the chrome-gnome-shell package by running the following command in Terminal sudo apt install chrome-gnome-shell Then visit https://extensions....


18

In ubuntu 13.10 the hotkeys to move windows to workspaces up and down have been changed: Move window up: shift+super+page up Move window down: shift+super+page down (the super key should be the "windows key" on your keyboard) You can change the hotkeys back to what they were from system settings, keyboard, shortcuts tab, "Navigation" menu, scroll down ...


17

How to disable or change the keyboard shortcut to switch workspaces 1. On Ubuntu Mate Although I am pretty sure the keyboard custom keybindings must be in a gsettings key somewhere in Mate as well, a quick search gave no result(s). That is a pity, since an elegant (automatic) solution would be preferable. However To change or disable the workspace-switch ...


14

Automatically set the number of workspaces; add and remove columns and rows, depending on your needs Below a version of a (the) backround script that will automatically add workspaces if you entered the last column or row of your workspace-matrix. This is how it works: If you arrive at the last column or row, additional viewports are added: If your ...


14

Use gsettings, not dconf, see this. e.g. gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings move-to-workspace-right "['<Shift><Ctrl><Alt>Right']" etc


13

I found the solution myself. It seems that I needed to enable Desktop Wall plugin in Compiz; just apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager, run ccsm and search for "wall" to find the option.


12

You can do that with Compiz. To install, just press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard to open Terminal. When it opens, run the command(s) below: sudo apt-get install compiz compizconfig-settings-manager compiz-plugins Once installed, run the program, and navigate to Window Management --> Workspace Naming, and change the names to whatever you want. Edit I just ...


11

Install CompizConfig Settings Manager: sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager compiz-plugins After installing CompizConfig Settings Manager it should be: Appications -> System Tools -> Preferences -> CompizConfig Settings Manager A window will appear, accompanied by a Warning dialog. Click OK on the warning dialog. Double-click ...


10

Pre-GNOME-Shell 3.10: With a combination of two extensions, it is possible. The downside is that you will have a bottom bar. My blog post explains various ways on how to do this, including getting rid of the bottom bar (included below). For 3.10 - 3.20: Go to extensions.gnome.org and find Frippery Bottom Panel. Install it. This will give you a bottom bar. ...


10

If it is only to set the workspaces, it seems a bit overkill to install additional software. To set it from command line, you only need two commands. Run in a terminal: dconf write /org/compiz/profiles/unity/plugins/core/vsize 1 to set the number of rows to one, and dconf write /org/compiz/profiles/unity/plugins/core/hsize 4 to set the number of columns ...


10

I had the same issue. Found the settings for this using dconf-editor, under org/gnome/desktop/wm/keybindings/move-to-workspace-left and org/gnome/desktop/wm/keybindings/move-to-workspace-right. The default keybindings are ctrl+alt+shift+left and ctrl+alt+shift+right but you can change them to whatever you like.


10

The Workspace Matrix extension is better than Workspace Grid in my experience. It's based on Workspace Grid, but fixed to work properly on Ubuntu 18, including thumbnails and some other weird kinks that Workspace Grid has (the grid was randomly changing size as I switched between workspaces, for example): https://github.com/mzur/gnome-shell-wsmatrix ...


8

Okay, I have found the answer. Settings - Window Manager Tweaks - Workspaces - Use the mouse wheel on the desktop to switch workspaces.


8

Press Ctrl + Super + D. Super is normally the windows key - the same which opens the acitivites overview. To view shortcuts, open settings and go to Keyboard and then the Shortcuts tab. This shortcut is "Hide all normal windows" under Navigation. Incedentally, Super + D also works for me - I'm not sure why! My pronouns are He / Him


8

In Gnome-Tweak-Tool you have the Menu Workspaces. Select Dynamic Workspaces -> Workspaces can be created on demand, and are automatically removed when empty. With this Option when you close the program from Workspace 3, then this workspace will be removed. I hope this will help you.


8

The setting is available, but is not exposed in the user interface. You can install dconf-editor to have a graphical interface to change a plethora of settings. The settings you are looking for are org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings switch-to-workspace-down ['<Super>Page_Down', '<Control><Alt>Down'] and org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings ...


7

You can use CompizConfig Settings Manager . Go to Desktop > Expo, select Bindings tab and change the value of Expo key as you wish: Generally, if you want to find quickly a keyboard shortcut which is set in CompizConfig Settings Manager, you can use Advanced Search option (Settings value must to be selected):


6

Maybe a slightly more comfortable way then using dconf on the command line is dconf-editor. Run dconf-editor and then navigate to org -> gnome -> desktop ->wm ->keybindings There you can find and edit the switch-to-workspace and move-to-workspace commands for workspaces 1 through 9.


6

This may help. On my system, the same thing was happening. I found, by checking the Keyboard>Shortcuts>Navigation that it's not Ctrl + Alt + Arrow, you haveto press Ctrl + Alt + shift+arrow perhaps the C+S+A is being used bu another programme so conflicts.


6

Technically, there is no shortcut for resizing workspaces, but you can use the simple script bellow and bind it to a shortcut. Take the script bellow, save it in the .local/share/applications folder , or wherever you prefer. Make sure the script is made executable with chmod 755 /path/to/script Bind it to a shortcut in System Settings -> Keyboard -> ...


6

If you have "dynamic workspaces" instead of "static workspaces" enabled, an empty workspace at the top or middle of the list will automatically go away once you switch to another workspace. But if you have GNOME extensions like "Auto Move Windows" or "Put Windows" enabled, this won't work. These extensions change the dynamic workspace behaviour to only ...


6

Use dconf (dconf-editor) to edit the /org/gnome/desktop/wm/preferences/workspace-names...


6

You can achieve something similar by using a GNOME Shell extension called "Workspace Indicator". It lets you Put an indicator on the panel signaling in which workspace you are, and give you the possibility of switching to another one. You can click the indicator and select the destination workspace. You can also scroll up/down to switch to the workspace ...


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