121

Parts of this answer comes from Setting microphone input volume using the command line?, placed here for your convenience. Increase volume by 5% amixer -D pulse sset Master 5%+ Decrease volume by 5% amixer -D pulse sset Master 5%- Set volume to 50% amixer -D pulse sset Master 50% If you are using ALSA, amixer can be helpful for your script ...


80

You can do it using PulseAudio itself (I won't recommend using ALSA because then you can't use the GUI to bring the volume up/down). Using pactl: you can set the volumes for a specific device as follows: pactl set-sink-volume 0 +10% This makes the volume 10% up. If you want it 10% down: pactl set-sink-volume 0 -10% If you need the volume at 50%: pactl ...


39

Adjusting sound level with a LADSPA plugin To obtain a fairly normalized sound output level independent of the input level we may use a LADSPA-plugin to filter the sound output through PulseAudio. see also: How can I apply a LADSPA plugin to a PulseAudio stream? As a minimum, we need a compressor plugin such as the dysonCompressor from the swh-plugins ...


37

@dobey's solution works if you want to have only one keyboard shortcut for increasing / decreasing the volume. If instead you want to have multiple key bindings controlling the volume (like to keep the default volume buttons on your laptop working, while adding additional keyboard shortcuts to use when you connect an external keyboard that does not have ...


34

This solution should work for all Thinkpads with a mute button which also has a built-in light. It may also work for other Thinkpads. Apart from the notification bubbles: There are two possible "hardware" indicators (to show that mute is on or off): The Power button light (green) will blink to show when mute is on The Mic mute button light (orange) will ...


24

The maximal possible volume level we can obtain from sliding the volume control to more than 100% is approx. 153% above the normal peak limit. Provided we had set the ALSA volume with alsamixer to 100 these 100% are the level above which audio will be clipped or distorted. This also will happen when amplifying to 153% with the slider. Nevertheless is is ...


23

amixer set 'Master' 10%+ - to increase max sound 10% amixer set 'Master' 10%- - to decrease max sound 10% amixer set 'Master' 10% - to get 10% of the max sound amixer set 'Master' 80% - to get 80% of the max sound .. etc. If you want to set the volume to other than 'Master', check the list by: amixer scontrols You may also want to check out alsamixer ...


19

If you want to use amixer to control the volume, this should work in a terminal: amixer -D pulse sset Master 0% (0% to mute or use any percentage you like) To reduce/increase the volume, you can add - or + after % (but that doesn't work to increase the sound beyond 100%).


17

I use a command line utility called mp3gain, which is available in the repositories. To use it, go into the directory where you store your music files, and then run this command: find -name '*mp3' -exec mp3gain -r -k {} \; It will go through every subdirectory, finding any file ending with .mp3, and normalize the gain so that they will also play back at a ...


15

IMO pactl set-sink-volume 0 +10% is a good choice too if you want key that slowly adds volume beyond 100% limit (I use Ctrl + VolumeUp for that).


15

Takkat's solution is good, but here's a variation which is simpler and permanent. There are only two steps: apt-get install swh-plugins Cut and paste the following into a file called ~/.config/pulse/default.pa: .nofail .include /etc/pulse/default.pa load-module module-ladspa-sink sink_name=ladspa_sink plugin=dyson_compress_1403 label=dysonCompress ...


15

Open System Settings, go to Keyboard, then the Shortcuts tab, and finally choose Sound and Media in the list on the left. You can then choose the Volume related items in the list on the right side, and select which keybinding to use. (Reverse usage of left and right here, for RTL languages.)


14

There is Sound Settings which will allow you to change all sound options much like Windows. You can adjust the slider to change volume,mute the output, control media playback etc. Once you choose sound Settings you can adjust all preferences by selecting a tab. If you want to have the functionality of the Windows sound menu control you will need to ...


14

This is still broken in 12.10. You can fix it by installing xfce4-mixer and then manually selecting the mixers to control with it - and then going into the xfce4 settings editor and typing in the name of the "active card". The mute button still won't work properly, you can mute but not unmute the sound with it. Everything else works though, including on ...


10

Go to System Settings and click keyboard. Click Shortcuts, and custom shortcuts. Click add and then enter into it the following: Volume+ amixer -D pulse sset Master 5%+ Click save and then repeat for Volume- (change the 5%+ to 5%-) Click on disabled, then press the appropriate volume key. It will say Do you want to reassign. Click yes. Do the same for ...


8

I experienced the same problem and I have written a post about the solution I found here. Basically what I did was this: Open the file /etc/pulse/default.pa by typing the following in a terminal: gksudo gedit /etc/pulse/default.pa Change the line that says load-module module-udev-detect into load-module module-udev-detect ignore_dB=1 Save and close ...


8

I use this: mute/unmute: amixer -q -D pulse set Master toggle Raise volume: amixer -q -D pulse set Master 5%+ unmute Lower volume: amixer -q -D pulse set Master 5%- unmute -D pulse: to make sure we are using pulseaudio (optional) unmute: so we do not accidentally raise the volume in muted state and be surprised when unmuting


8

On Xubuntu 16.04 the xfce4-mixer plugin is no longer available. Try sudo apt install xfce4-pulseaudio-plugin (which is not in the goodies package)


8

I found a bug report on launchpad regarding this issue and it seems when reassigning the media keys some prefix is missing. The following lines are somewhat of a summary of what is discussed in bug report You can issue the following command to see your current keybinding: gsettings get org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.media-keys volume-up Output ...


7

I figured that answers (currently all other answers) that suggest pactl set-sink-volume 0 ... don't work (or stop working) on systems with more than one audio devices, e.g. as soon as you connect to a hdmi monitor. we should use @DEFAULT_SINK@ instead of 0 to refer to active audio device. so here is my setup on ubuntu 14.04 with gnome 3.10 and should work ...


7

sudo apt-get install pavucontrol and adjust to suit


7

Traditional stereo headphones have only three leads, while ones with a microphone and/or the "button" have four. In order for the microphone or the button to work on your machine, the headphone jack must also have four leads (which is unlikely) and the drivers you're using must also support the fourth lead. It is unlikely that the manufacturer would ...


7

I tried this command: pactl set-sink-volume alsa_output.pci-0000_00_1b.0.analog-stereo 150% and it was very helpful. One can change the 150% to any value.


6

I have the same issue (also on hp dv4 running 11.10, worked fine on 11.04). I just tried the following and it worked for me. Go to 'sound settings' and click on 'output'. There you will see 'analog headphones' for the connector (at the bottom). Change that to 'analog speakers' and you will get sound on your headphones. Strange, but it works.


6

I simply add the following piece of code in my start up script & add that script in my start up application by Menu >> Applications >> Other >> Startup Applications. For this first you need to install pulseaudio-utils by sudo apt-get install pulseaudio-utils #!/bin/bash # start.sh - commands to run when OS starts #Increase Audio ...


6

A late answer but could be useful for someone. You can control the volume for the current sink using the following commands Raise Volume: pactl set-sink-volume @DEFAULT_SINK@ +1000 Lower Volume: pactl set-sink-volume @DEFAULT_SINK@ -1000 Mute: pactl set-sink-mute @DEFAULT_SINK@ toggle You can use the following values to control the volume: Integer ...


6

I am not sure you can do this system-wide, but Ubuntu supports adjusting the volume with the mouse wheel if you hover over the volume icon and then scroll the wheel up or down.


6

Go to Applications tab in Sound settings.


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