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Happens to me too on a P1 Gen2 (very similar hardware) with a Lenovo Thunderbolt 3 Graphics Dock. Earlier today, I logged-on into Windows 10 and updated all firmware and BIOS of the laptop, as well as all firmware of the dock. I did not see the issue happen again so far, in Ubuntu 20.04, but I can't confirm it is gone - it comes and goes after all. The ...


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Hello i have the same web cam, i did: sudo nano /etc/enviroment and added: LD_PRELOAD=/usr/lib/libv4l/v4l2convert.so then rebooted the system and it works with all the programs including the browser. To turn off the webcam without unplugging do: sudo modprobe -r gspca_ov519 To turn it back on do: sudo modprobe gspca_ov519 Also make sure you've installed ...


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My Logitech USB speakers weren't recognised by the latest Ubuntu, but worked as soon as I plugged into the front headphone jack. Sounds good now.


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Try if adb.exe devices can works normally. Basically as long as your Win 10 can use adb, then it should also work directly. sudo vim /etc/profile, then add the below lines(fastboot is optionally) and save, please replace the adb and fastboot paths with your actual paths. export PATH=$PATH:/mnt/c/Program\ Files/platform-tools_r30.0.3-windows/platform-tools/ ...


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Fixed by making BFQ the default scheduler and defining rules for non default media, so only rotational media uses the default setting now. # set scheduler for NVMe ACTION=="add|change", KERNEL=="nvme[0-9]*", ATTR{queue/scheduler}="none" # set scheduler for SSD and eMMC ACTION=="add|change", KERNEL=="sd[a-z]|mmcblk[...


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To tell the kernel to reboot you can use ALT+SysRq REISUB continue holding down ALT key as you type all letters From Wikipedia the REISUB the the kernel unRaw (take control of keyboard back from X), tErminate (send SIGTERM to all processes, allowing them to terminate gracefully), kIll (send SIGKILL to all processes except init, forcing them to terminate ...


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I have one desktop pc which cannot boot from usb drives. (older hardware 2005/2007) So i burned Plop linux [1]: https://download.plop.at/ploplinux/19.4/live/ploplinux-19.4-x86_64.iso on a dvd (which the older system did support) and booted from it. The first thing you get to see is a bootmenu, with the option for installation of a bootmenu (usb bootmenu), ...


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Simple solution: plug the flash drive into a computer that operates on Windows. Windows will detect the error and instruct you to scan and repair it. The drive will then work on Ubuntu in the usual way.


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Encrypted 20.04 Full Install USB for BIOS and UEFI Ubuntu 20.04 makes Full Disk Encryption easy. step by step Unplug HDD Boot Live USB in BIOS mode, insert Target drive. Start Install Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. Select Language, Keyboard, Wireless, Normal Installation, Install third Party... . At Installation type Tag "Erase disk and install Ubuntu" and ...


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At the end it was caused by cabling: the USB cable I was using was a charge-only cable. You must be sure that the cable connects all of the four pins


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Ubuntu Install Quick Start Download Ubuntu 20.04 https://ubuntu.com/download/desktop Start with a USB of at least 4GB formatted FAT32. If using Windows, download Rufus. https://rufus.ie/ Double click the Rufus .exe file. (No need to install). Select USB Device and Ubuntu ISO file for Boot Selection. Stretch the Persistent partition size almost to the end. ...


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Make a Live USB with the persistent partition in main, internal Hard Drive. A Persistent USB will use the first Persistent partition it sees. Usually a persistent partition on the internal HDD is first. The Persistent partition needs to be an ext partition, say ext4. The partition should be labelled casper-rw, (Labelling it writable is optional for 20.04)....


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Creating Live USB using Live USB. Download the ISO's you want, (we will assume they are official Ubuntu flavors for now), and use the built in Startup Disk Creator to make more Live USB's. You can set Firefox to save the downloads to your other USB or copy them there by hand later. Better yet, download mkusb and create a persistent USB to work from. See: Can ...


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Glad to hear that you've decided to switch to Ubuntu. To answer your first question, using USB 2.0 to create a live USB will not significantly impact speeds. You should be able to use the USB with no problems at all. You can create a live USB with persistence by following this tutorial. Your live USB session is exclusive from your Windows installation, and ...


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You could try to make a dual boot installation too. Ubuntu 20.04 makes it very simple. Also if you have a windows machine i would suggest Rufus as your best alternative to create a bootable usb. It allows you to create persistent live usb's.


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In a USB 2 pendrive I suggest that you create a live (live-only) system with Ubuntu, or if you wish an Ubuntu family flavour (Kubuntu, Lubuntu ... Xubuntu). Lubuntu and Xubuntu have lighter footprints, The desktop environment needs less computing power (CPU) and less memory (RAM). If you want a persistent live drive, I suggest that you get a fast USB 3 ...


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Using Unetbootin there is an option to add persistance to your USB drive .Works for Ubuntu and its derivatives.Just download the ISO from Ubuntu and point Unetbootin to it.and follow prompts. Google unetbootin to find version for your windows machine.


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I ran not only live USB but also complete installed Ubuntu from USB 2.0. It woks fine for most of the time. making a live USB do not make any change to your present system. because you just write a ISO image on a USB using software like Unetbootin. During booting you have to select boot from USB option. If you want a persistent system you have to install ...


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Copy Ubuntu from Desktop to USB drive It is quite easy to copy Ubuntu from your desktop computer to a USB drive, so that It boots both BIOS and UEFI modes. Start by creating a Persistent USB using mkusb with default settings. Delete partitions 4 and 5. Keep partition 1 if you want a Linux/Windows data partition. Confirm that there is enough empty space on ...


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Crazy suggestion: check your cable. Some seemingly high-quality cables won't negotiate gbps speeds and so everything ends up at 480mbps of USB2. When this happens, in lsusb it will land under the USB 2 controller, and the device will be listed as usb2 / 480m. It's normal/standard for the XHCI driver to expose both a USB 2 hub and a USB 3 hub in lsusb, and ...


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Crazy suggestion: check your cable. It might be that your USB cable can't handle gbps and so everything is negotiating to 480mbps of USB2. It's normal/standard for the XHCI driver to expose both a USB 2 hub and a USB 3 hub in lsusb. You have both - the 5000M entry is USB 3. When you plug something in, it will appear under one or the other hub, depending ...


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I see that the driver is listed as ehci. You might need to enable xhci support in your BIOS to get USB 3 working.


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It is not possible to do it the way you have tried and, no, it won't work to just copy files from a computer to a USB stick and make it work. There is a way to install Ubuntu (or whichever distribution you choose) but it is tricky. There is a recipe in the accepted answer on: How to Create a Full Install of Ubuntu 20.04 to USB Device Step by Step Be sure to ...


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Encrypted 20.04 Full Install USB that Boots BIOS and UEFI Modes Ubuntu 20.04 makes full disk encryption easy. Unplug HDD Boot Live USB in BIOS/Legacy mode, insert Target drive. Start Install Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. Select Language, Keyboard, Wireless, Normal Installation, Install third Party... . At Installation type Tag "Erase disk and install Ubuntu&...


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It could be because of usb-port. Sometimes usb-ports of computers or notebooks are not fully mounted by driver. So you could try : umount /dev/sdb1 or sudo umount /dev/sdb1 then mount /dev/sdb1 or sudo mount /dev/sdb1 If this does not help - plug-out and plug-in again the usb-drive (usb-stick?). Then repeat umount and mount again like written above. ...


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I was looking an trying many different apps and this one made my day: https://github.com/ondrej1024/crelay Working without any modifications to cp210x module on kernel 4.19 on my raspberry!


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It was an issue with Nvidia graphics driver. Solved it by downgrading the driver.


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I found the answer: The xinput settings only work in an X context. But they are not run e.g. from a terminal started in your desktop manager. e.g. ACTION=="add", ATTRS{idVendor}=="046d", ATTRS{idProduct}=="c084", ENV{DISPLAY}=":0.0", ENV{XAUTHORITY}="/home/administrator/.Xauthority", RUN+="/some/script....


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The MS-DOS filesystem does not have permissions. Advanced permissions simply are not part of the filesystem. You can only mark them A,S,H,I. On the old MS-DOS, you use the ATTRIB command: ATTRIB [+R | -R] [+A | -A] [+S | -S] [+H | -H] [+I | -I] [drive:][path][file name] [/S [/D] [/L]] The following are the attributes of an MS-DOS filesystem: R Read-only ...


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Please try: git clone https://github.com/RinCat/RTL88x2BU-Linux-Driver.git cd RTL88x2BU-Linux-Driver/ make sudo make install sudo modprobe 88x2bu After each kernel update, you must recompile: cd ~/RTL88x2BU-Linux-Driver/ make clean git pull make sudo make install sudo modprobe 88x2bu


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The new driver at displaylink fixed by display issues. I have an ASUS and Nvidia drivers. After upgrading to Focal Fossa my dual displays stopped working; but, the latest driver 5.3.1.34 fixed the issues. Just remember to extract the file then right click on properties to enable it to run as an executable. Good Luck!


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You can use Ventoy. As per their website it is opensource and you can boot multiple OS live image ISO image from single USB. Copy Ubuntu ISO image on ventoy USB disk and boot in to live disk. From here you can install Ubuntu on a UBS disk which will be a persistent one.


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I managed to solve it by following the instructions on: https://www.displaylink.com/downloads/ubuntu and disabling secure boot.


2

I could solve the same issue with the following method. I'll consider that for the rest of the article (change it as per your own configuration): the hard drive is sda and the boot partition is sda1 (which maps to (hd1,gpt1) in GRUB, (hd0) being the GRUB USB) /dev/sda1 contains a /boot/vmlinuz kernel and /boot/initrd.img disk the Ubuntu bootable USB is sdb ...


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LUKS or Full Encryption Options in the Installer Install to USB as you would to HDD. It is recommended that you remove the HDD before proceeding, especially in UEFI mode. They have done a good job of hiding encryption options in the Live installer. It is located on the install page, just above Something else. Tag "Erase disk and install Ubuntu" and ...


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Creating a Full install USB the Easy way Download Image File: https://phillw.net/isos/linux-tools/uefi-n-bios/dd_unb_ubuntu-20.04_15GB_2020-06-26.img.xz Download Rufus: https://github.com/pbatard/rufus/releases/download/v3.11/rufus-3.11.exe Double click Rufus exe file. (No need to install it). Select USB2 Target drive in Rufus. Select Image File in ...


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Your file is still there. It's just now named /dev/sdb1 and has replaced the device special node that would otherwise be used to mount your USB disk. You can recover it by moving it back to somewhere else, for example: sudo mv /dev/sdb1 /home/myname/Downloads/m.mp4 Don't overwrite files in /dev as these are not normal files, but special markers which give ...


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Looks like powertop --auto-tune was causing USB autosuspend to occur when it shouldn't. Disabling powertop seems to have resolve it.


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lsblk command could be used to find out your mount point: $ lsblk | grep -v loop NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 223.6G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 1M 0 part ├─sda2 8:2 0 221.6G 0 part / └─sda3 8:3 0 2G 0 part [SWAP] sdb 8:16 0 232.9G 0 disk └─sdb1 8:17 0 232.9G 0 part /home All devices in /...


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You can boot from usb only. TL,DR : extract vmlinuz to vmlinux in the boot partition of the latest ubuntu image from their website. explaination: per the official ubuntu wiki page for arm processors, you need to edit config.txt in the boot partition, and replace the kernel line to kernel=vmlinuz only problem is vmlinuz is compressed. so you have to ...


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I was able to fix the issue. I'm not sure exactly what fixed it, but I was following another stack overflow post which suggested reinstalling bluez after deleting /etc/bluetooth as well as installing linux-firmware. I did both of these and shutdown and rebooted after a minute. Everything now works. Dmesg no longer shows the failed to disable LE scan message ...


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There's a vast array of problems that can cause these symptoms, and it's a pickle to understand. A good first step is checking /var/log/syslog for any unusual activity. For me the problem were aggressive wifi-scans, about once every 1/10 sec, despite the computer being connected to a wired network. This caused the whole system to slow down, causing keyboard, ...


1

It seems that you are trying to mount a disk instead of a partition on the disk, which is not possible. fdisk -l should list partitions such as /dev/sda1 or /dev/sda2. Mount those instead; they should work. If there are no partitions, you have not formatted your disk; use GParted or another program to do so. In addition, your usb drive should not be /dev/sda,...


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This question deserves an updated answer now that there are USB enclosures on the market that support trim. For example if your enclosure uses the JMICRON JMS583 chip then it supports trim. I am going to only include the steps required to get it to work if it is supported, but if you want a more detailed walk-through see the source link below. Get the ...


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Phoronix Test Suite (PTS) is a free and open-source benchmark software for Linux and other operating systems. The Phoronix Test Suite has been endorsed by sites such as Linux.com, LinuxPlanet and has been called "the best benchmarking platform" by Softpedia. The Phoronix Test Suite is also used by Tom's Hardware, ASELabs and other review sites. - (...


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As we see from your listing of loaded modules (lsmod), there are two possibly conflicting drivers loaded. Let's blacklist one and see if there is any improvement. From the terminal: sudo -i echo "blacklist cdc_ether" >> /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf exit Reboot and check: ip addr show dmesg | grep 815


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As of writing, there is no easy way of booting the preinstalled raspberry pi ubuntu-server image from usb only. But there is an easy workaround - that worked for me: copy the image to micro-sd-card and usb-stick/harddrive delete the second partition named "writeable" from the micro-sd-card (not necessary - but might avoid later complications) ...


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I swiped the Harddrive, made a fresh installation with 20.04 and all is working fine now. So the Live-Update from 19.10 to 20.04 may have not worked thoroughly fine. So doing it by iso may work also for others.


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just for reference: it solved itself. i have no idea how, as i definitely did restart and dis-/reconnect this soundcard a few times before posting. maybe it sorted itself out with just a normal update - any way it's miraculously working again, yay! sorry for bothering, but never the less thanks for the help!


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In your case maybe you can't run that Linux for Eee PC, but anyways, To make a bootable flash disk: Command line version: you need to plug your flash disk into your laptop and then run sudo mount to see which device is related to it (for example it can be /dev/sdb or something else) dd if=Your_.iso_of_UbuntuStudio of=/dev/sdX bs=4M conv=fdatasync status=...


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