86

It's there to run things that don't need any special permissions. It's usually reserved for vulnerable services (httpd, etc) so that if they get hacked, they'll have minimal damage on the rest of the system. Contrast this with running something as a real user, if that service were compromised (web servers are occasionally exploited to run arbitrary code), ...


32

If you created the user account with useradd, you have to set up everything for it manually. This is why, when creating user accounts from the command-line, it is recommended to use adduser in Ubuntu (and Debian, and other Debian-based systems) instead. You might just want to remove the user with userdel or deluser and recreate it with adduser. Otherwise... ...


29

In many Unix variants, "nobody" is the conventional name of a user account which owns no files, is in no privileged groups, and has no abilities except those which every other user has. It is common to run daemons as nobody, especially servers, in order to limit the damage that could be done by a malicious user who gained control of them. ...


22

Not a single click, but I can give you a keyboard shortcut solution. Go into the menu to set custom keyboard shortcuts and add a new one with this command: dm-tool switch-to-user suzi Assuming suzi is your wife's username, and set a shortcut of your choice by clicking where is says "disabled" and then pressing the key combination you want to use (for ...


22

The user nobody is reserved for NFS only. The anwers above are rather wrong, because they assume that nobody is a "generic" anonymous/guest style user id. In the UNIX/Linux access control model anonymous/guest style user ids don't exist and these are bad suggestions: "common to run daemons as nobody, especially servers, in order to limit the damage that ...


17

The nobody user is created by default on a fresh install (checked on Ubuntu Desktop 13.04). In many *nix variants, nobody is the conventional name of a user account which owns no files, is in no privileged groups, and has no abilities except those which every other user has (the nobody user and group do not have any entry in the /etc/sudoers file). ...


7

You can us a Function Key combination. F1 is the first DISPLAY, then F2, F3, etc. If you were the first one logged in your DISPLAY would be F1. The next user's DISPLAY would be F2. So you can quickly swwitch between user's by hitting Alt+Ctrl+F# With this method you can save having to login when switching between sessions.


5

Simply click on Second Icon from right (Session Indicator) on Unity panel and Select "Switch User Account".


4

I was able to fix it by removing lightdm, re-installing lightdm, and then rebooting. Not sure what went wrong, but I can switch users again no problem. sudo apt-get remove lightdm sudo apt-get install lightdm


2

Fast user switching opens another X server on the next available VT. There are at least 24 available VTs on a Linux system.


2

Go to System Settings > User Accounts and follow the indications from the next immage: Apply the same settings on both accounts.


2

nobody is a special user and group account. Because it is an actual username (and groupname) and can be used by processes and even users, it is not literally nobody. For example, some Apache configurations have nobody as the user/group that owns the website files and directories. The problem comes when multiple processes might use the nobody user, such as ...


2

I had a similar problem, but with proprietary drivers for an NVIDIA graphics card. I had used the nvidia-319-updates package which seems to automatically update the proprietary driver to latest versions. Switching to the tested nvidia-319 made the problem disappear. As you seem to have AMD, try a different or free driver to see if that's the cause. You can ...


2

Start your solution by opening the terminal (Alt+Ctrl+T) and enter: sudo /usr/lib/lightdm/lightdm-set-defaults --show-manual-login true Restart the computer, hope it will work, if it doesn't remove ~/.Xauthority in home by sudo rm ~/.Xauthority then you can easily login. If you have installed cinammon then, try the following: sudo apt-get remove --...


2

From TuKsn's link, right click on the Whisker icon (top right) and you get a 'Properties' menu entry, from there, switch to the 'Behavior' tab and enable the 'Switch Users' option.


1

You can go to the GDM greeter by pressing Ctrl+Alt+F1 without logging out the current user. From there it's quite intuitive to login as another user. To mimic this from the command-line you can use xdotool. First install it by running sudo apt install xdotool Then the following would mimic the aforementioned key-combination xdotool key ctrl+alt+F1 You ...


1

You are never loosing your data, because you have, at any time, a good backup copy of your data, preferably on multiple locations. If you do not have any backup copy of your data, then that means that you do not care about these data. It is then not important if they are overwritten when installing a new operating system. That said, for your case, for sure ...


1

Try go to settings/display and check if there is more than one monitor, and if yes turn off the monitors not in use.


1

I struggled with this problem since upgrading to 13.10 in October. I believe I've finally solved it by upgrading to the development version of lightdm (1.9.7). https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/lightdm/1.9.7-0ubuntu2/+build/5582036 To determine if lightdm is the source of your problem you could try replacing lightdm with gdm. If things go smoothly with ...


1

Summary: done, usable, current solution is acceptable only in a cooperative multi-user environment, can be improved. I wrote a usable-proof-of-concept patch to lightdm that does the job. It does what we need here! See below for installation instructions. Prerequisites A system with at least two user accounts and users willing to allow quick switch ...


1

This works in 14.04 - http://ubuntuhandbook.org/index.php/2013/07/login-without-a-password-on-ubuntu/ With gnome-system-tools & their "Users and Groups"


1

add user sudo adduser -m -s /bin/bash -m means add home directory, -s means the following is their login shell remove user password sudo passwd -d USERNAME now to allow passwordless logins you need to edit a text file pico /etc/pam.d/common-auth OR gedit /etc/pam.d/common-auth AND REPLACE THE LINE auth [success=1 default=ignore] ...


1

I had the same problem (dell M3800 with optimus graphics) on a clean install of 13.10, but the updates I installed this morning seem to have fixed it. I can now switch users fine either from the "cog" menu or from the lock screen


1

I got the solutions for managing permissions by installing some software I have tried mount manager and storage device manager for managing the partitions. Both applications are good but storage device manager is easy while mountmanager have more functionalities. those applications don't provide access to guest users but provide access to specific ...


1

OpenSeedbox seems to match your requirements, but more like a server rather than a client.


1

Today I found a post that seemed to help matters. As I said I have two profiles on this computer. The second one is used for the kids and has (had) no password. Apparently having an account without a password can cause these types of problems. I have put a password on that account and everything seems to be a lot better. Not sure if all is completely well ...


1

Gnome 3 displays the Switch User option only when you have multiple normal user accounts on your system with a user id between 1000 and 29999 (Debian, Ubuntu). If you want to switch to a user account within the reserved id range of your distribution, you can lock the screen with Super+L or Ctrl+Alt+L and click on Log in as another user below the login form....


1

This mostly happens when you create the user without creating a home directory for the user. This can be solved by using this command when creating user useradd -m the_username The -m flag is what creates the home directory for the user. After creating the user check if the home directory exists for that user by doing ls /home If you can see that ...


1

When you log out -> the login screen settings are governed by the root user(I think). So any video settings relevant would be "different" (from the settings to your monitors and graphics as /user) So if i were to take a stab in the dark, I would say general "Graphics error" (because i dont know enough information) I recommend troubleshooting by logging in as ...


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