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In Files (Nautilus), you should be able to click on the eject icon that appears just to the right of the partition name, in the left pane of Files. In terminal you can sudo umount /dev/xxxx. In Disks you can select the disk, then go to the 3-dot menu, and select Power Off (after unmounting it). Your device (partition) path is not /dev/nvme0n1, it would be ...


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heynnema was correct. The SSD just needed to be reseated, which fixed the issue. Thanks.


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I ended up upgrading to a Samsung 1TB and the issue went away. I assume it was hardware related.


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Yes additional drive usually goes under /media and the owner is usually the same user that will need to use it (and it's often the user that mounted the drive). For example if you are logged as user123 and plug a USB stick, nautilus will mount your drive under /media/user123/<usb-stick-name>/ and you will be the owner of that folder. However you're ...


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You need to shrink your existing partition Windows has created one huge partition covering all of your 1 TB HDD. They probably call it D:\ or some such thing. You need to shrink that NTFS formatted partition to make room for Ubuntu. Do not create a new partition! Make as much room for Ubuntu as you want it to have, 100 GB, 200 GB, 900 GB or whatever. However,...


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If you only want Ubuntu installed on your drive: No, nowdays partitionning is not mandatory. Ubuntu can totaly be installed on one partition and in fact it's the default beahviour of Ubuntu installer. Partitionning is only mandatory if you have mutiple OS.


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Try this: Run in a terminal: sudo apt update sudo apt install --reinstall util-linux sudo fallocate -l 4G /swapfile


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Samsung T3, T5 and now also T7 SSD are NOT compatible with Linux, if encrypted The proprietary unlock software only comes for Mac or Windows I tried a long time to unlock an encrypted drive in Linux, even manually by capturing raw USB unlock commands in windows and then attempting to replay in Linux but it is more difficult than I imagined and failed to ...


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The problem was of a SSD features, the Autonomous Power State Transitions(APST) was causing the freezes. To mitigate it, until they will release the fix, include the line nvme_core.default_ps_max_latency_us=0 in the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT options. For instance: GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian` ...


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Wanted to update this, as I have figured out the problem. After multiple reinstalls of Budgie, and an install of Kubuntu, I figured out that it was indeed a hardware problem; my SSD had failed. I contacted Crucial and told them about the I/O error, and they confirmed it was failing hardware and helped me replace it. Thanks for the help.


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I'm going to assume that you have tested this drive thoroughly to make sure that it should not have any problems recognizing the drive, no matter the connection type. With the "ass-out-of-you-and-me" steps behind us, time for some fun. A few testing steps: Step 1: Make sure that your BIOS is set up to boot from your original HDD, the one currently ...


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the issue was related to Bios settings , SATA MODE was set to Raid while it should be AHCI , also i had to close the secure boot to enable the installation


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Given that you have experience with Ubuntu on your laptop, you may be able to estimate if this scenario is feasible. Put both / and /home on the SSD. Use the HDD for big and relatively rarely used files, such as pictures and videos. You can mount the HDD as (something like) /home/$USER/big-files. That way, you get fast boot, fast access to your configuration ...


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If you are doing a completely new installation, then you can just use the manual partitioning process. Make sure to boot in UEFI mode, and that you create an EFI System Partition (ESP) and enough swap space (which is also used for hibernation). How to use manual partitioning during installation? has a few details. Adding the harddisk as /home in the ...


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How should I use my SDD as mount/ and HDD as /Home? Don't. Put /home on the SSD. The configuration files benefit from the speed off the SSD and if the HDD is too slow to spin up during boot, it could end up not mounting your HDD (not likely this is an issue anymore on modern Linux though). What is better: there is a configuration file on /home/$USER/.config ...


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The problem described is about the same here. I have a computer with ASUS Z10PE motherboard. That one has an in-built M2 NVMe slot. I also added 1 PCIe card that supports 1 NVMe drive. I also modded the BIOS to get bifurcation mode to have one PCIe slot to be divided in 4X4X4X4 so I can fit in the ASUS M2 Hyper PCIe card that allows up to 4 NVMe drives. If I ...


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I have been informed by someone on the Ubuntu forum, that the missing space should be reserved by root. So the remaining problems are really just the wrong free space shown in the Trash folder and the supposed 130Tib of used space, which I can both live with. And thus I consider this issue resolved (enough)


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Most caddies have a small USB to SATA converter module inside them, and this can cause problems sometimes, as HDD/SSDs may require reformatting before they can be used in the caddy. Return your SSD back to its original location, and backup from there. However, without knowing more about your failure mode, I can recommend performing a fsck on the file system ...


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You can run Smart data and test runs on your SDD. Open disk utility and select your hard disk from left menu. Press Ctrl + S and run smart test on your disk. It will run test and generate report. If overall assesment is OK then it is fine.


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