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0

If you are trying to empty all of the lines. A pretty elegant and simplest approach is from the bash-cli: echo "" > filename.txt nano filename.txt


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Oddly enough, my keys didn't work the way @YuganTej described above; after my upgrade from 16.04 LTS to 18.04 LTS. However, that answer did help me figure out how to move the windows to both sides of the screen, finally. The key combinations that work for me are: Super+Left Arrow Super+Right Arrow Ctrl+Super+Up Arrow Ctrl+Super+Down Arrow I also ...


0

For Ubuntu 18.04 In terminal works: amixer set Capture toggle && amixer get Capture | grep '\[off\]' && notify-send "MIC switched OFF" || notify-send "MIC switched ON" But if I just put this command in "Command" field for Custom Shortcut, it doesn't work I created a Shell Script with path /home/username/ToggleMic.sh: #!/bin/bash amixer ...


0

While holding Ctrl + Alt you're switching between workspaces, and you don't select a workspace until you release, so you can't move a window by adding Shift because there are no windows in focus.


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Keyboard's brightness is working out of the box with Ubuntu 19.10 on the ASUS TUF FX505DY with the Ryzen 5 and the Radeon RX 560x, i.e., on your laptop.


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you can move a window to another display with super+shift+arrow depending on how you configured your displays. If the other display is on the right, you would use super+shift+right to get the active window there


1

The above answer by FatalMerlin worked great. You can also do an ‘alt-f2’ followed by ‘r’ and enter to restart gnome without the reboot...


0

for gnome-shell, one just needs to edit this file: /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/pc. and then reboot.


0

This is a known issue with IBus. See here. The following workaround seems to work. In the ~/.xprofile file (create it if it doesn't already exist), add the following: export GTK_IM_MODULE=xim export XMODIFIERS=@im=ibus export QT_IM_MODULE=xim ibus-daemon -xrd Then logout of the current session (or reboot) and log back in. The emoji key combo should be ...


0

kwriteconfig5 --file ~/.config/kwinrc --group ModifierOnlyShortcuts --key Meta "org.kde.plasmashell,/PlasmaShell,org.kde.PlasmaShell,activateLauncherMenu" works most of the time for me. It adds the setting to the kwin config file. This means it defines a new so called "ModifierOnlyShortcurt", which is just the Meta key to activate the launcher menu.


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Move window from left monitor to right monitor: Super (i.e. Windows key)+Shift+right arrow Move window from right monitor to left monitor: Super(i.e. Windows key)+Shift+left arrow


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This can be solved by lowering your focus steal prevention level, to do this, first install compiz config settings manager, it can be done through the software center, or running: sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager then launch it and go to general options > focus & raise behaviour > Focus prevention level; and set it to low or off, VLC ...


2

Quick answer: essentially No. Long answer: There is almost no build-in possibility to control the window position and characteristics of newly opened application windows. The only control available is whether you want new windows positioned in the center, or according to a "smart" algorithm. That setting even is not exposed by default. It is however ...


0

It took me a little bit to figure out the gotcha with trying to do mappings on a PS/2 keyboard with showkey and setkeycodes. As hinted at on the man page for setkeycodes, there is a problem that affects tools that report scan codes such as showkey -s in the sense that they don't show the actual scan codes that are appropriate input for setkeycodes: In 2....


0

I managed to figure it out in the end, just needed to step back and think about it. For anyone else with the same problem, my solution was to go into Settings > Keyboard and create two shortcuts, one for "setxkbmap -layout us -variant intl" and one for "sekxkbmap -layout gb", and I can now use these to change my keyboard back and forth. Still mildly irked ...


0

Run sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration and change that setting to No toggling. Run gsettings reset org.gnome.desktop.input-sources xkb-options


2

I made an attempt at using Caps Lock for the purpose, and even if I made it work, Caps Lock also kept doing its original thing, i.e. toggling to/from capital letters, which reasonably is not a desirable behavior. So below I show how it can be done using "3rd level of Right Ctrl" instead. On my Ubuntu 19.10 I run this command: gsettings set org.gnome....


1

If xev isn't displaying anything when you press the key, make sure your keyboard isn't in a "gaming mode". I ran into this with a Logitech G710+. The button to toggle the mode looks like a little joystick and apparently one thing it does is disable the "Windows key". I assume it's to keep you from being pulled out of a full screen game if you miss pressing ...


0

What also works is Alt + F7 to Grab the Window then move it with the Arrow-keys and release it with Enter.


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I've decided to use + and - (from the numpad) instead of mouse wheel up / down. Those keys are used by many programs for zooming without a mouse. # Numpad '+' xsetwacom set "Wacom Intuos BT S Pad pad" Button 3 "key 0xffab" # Numpad '-' xsetwacom set "Wacom Intuos BT S Pad pad" Button 8 "key 0xffad"


1

Launch the Settings application and go to Devices > Keyboard. Under the 'Navigation' section, set Alt+Tab as the shortcut for 'Switch applications'. For 'Switch windows', use something else, for example Super+Tab.


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In your startup.sh you can add exec before uwsgi. #!/usr/bin/env bash service nginx start exec uwsgi --ini uwsgi.ini After that you will be able to do Ctrl+C to stop it. Source


1

It's a known bug, tracked upstream at https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/gtk/issues/2174. As stated there, disabling header bar or disabling mnemonics are possible workarounds.


2

Because I like commmand line (fast) solutions, I tried the above gsettings command, but had to modify it: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings switch-input-source "['<Alt>Shift_L']"


0

Another alternative is to download this gnome extension https://extensions.gnome.org/extension/935/toggle-touchpad/


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Save custom keyboard shortcuts You can save/backup/export custom shortcuts/keybidings using just dconf and sed Export dconf dump / | sed -n '/\[org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.media-keys/,/^$/p' > custom-shortcuts.ini # Export Import dconf load / < custom-shortcuts.ini # Import Based on Ciro's answer (also here) Only for the added custom ...


0

A possible solution can be to check if the option Preferences → Keyboard → Layout → Options → [Switching to another Layout] → [Ctr+Shift] is checked. I've unchecked this option and I was able to use Ctrl+Shift+Right or Left Arrow for word selection in Linux Mint 19.2. I hope it works in Ubuntu, too.


2

One possible reason is mentioned in Analyzing GNOME keyboard shortcuts which is one in a series "to analyze keyboard shortcuts in most major DEs". Quoting from there: Meta+arrow does not match a full set of tiling like Plasma (in which Meta+Up/Down tiles up and down), that is, it does not match semantically, because GNOME acknowledges that tiling up and ...


-1

Today I found a way to open the interactive screeenshot tool from the cli. gimp --batch '(plug-in-screenshot RUN-INTERACTIVE FALSE 0 0 0 0 0)' --new-instance If you want to understand this look at https://www.gimp.org/tutorials/Basic_Batch/ to understand the basic syntax. To lookup specific commands navigate to Help > Procedure Browser and search for ...


1

I had to disable the following extension: Had it turned on, since I never use the (quite lousy) touchscreen on my Thinkpad, but I guess I can live without it.


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