New answers tagged

-1

The problem is very common. I suggest you to reinstall the linux, and put something on the password, easy to remember. Is the easy way to solve this.


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As you stated, it's asking for "Administrator" password, which is the root password and not yours. This probably happens because of passwordless sudo, although I'm not 100% sure. You could try restoring sudo to its normal behaviour and see if that solves the problem, or just set a password for root and use that when asked. To change root password, simply ...


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I've installed skypeforlinux on Gentoo, so having these Gnome prompts showing up was a bit of surprise. For those coming from other distros getting here through search this is what I've figured. As a dependency skypeforlinux pulls in libsecret which pulls in gnome-keyring. tl;dr If I understand it correctly after you login to skypeforlinux it stores access ...


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I suggest you to re-install the SO, but when it ask for password, put something simple, that you can remember, so you dont have this problem. I dont know another way to solve this


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1. Start your machine in recovery mode -> Resume to normal boot. You should get a prompt with root. Follow the steps below: root@demo:~$ mount -o remount,rw / root@demo:~$ passwd yourusername Enter new UNIX password: Retype new UNIX password: passwd: password updated successfully root@demo:~$ reboot 2. You can use chroot. Start your machine with Live CD/...


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If you have installed it very recently, i could suggest you to reinstall it(formatting and install again) or try to enter to the instalation and "repair" your actual version. If you do this, try to add a password to the user, one easy for you to remmember, so you can have it easily(and dont have this problem again) About the GRUB, i cant help you. I have a ...


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if you mean the private key chain in linux; then you probably have to enter the "phrase" that you entered before it prompts to you like this Enter passphrase Enter same passphrase again:


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Thank you for your help, Robby1212. I got this to work. I think the issue was the graphics driver and the NVidia card. By installing the NVidia graphics driver, I was able to login with the other user account. Below is the output of nvidia-smi. I think some of this was not working with the preinstalled Ubuntu graphics drivers, and hence the login ...


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Try logging in at the usual login screen with Xorg instead of Wayland. Click the gear icon to the left of the Sign In button and select Ubuntu on Xorg from the dropdown menu. This selection will be persistent across reboots unless you switch back to Wayland. If that doesn't work try switching the login display manager from gdm3 to lightdm. LightDM is ...


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Moving the user's line to an external file fixed it: $ sudo visudo -f /etc/sudoers.d/myOverrides


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I was able to execute a file search and found accounts.conf with the offending login name. I renamed the file to accounts.conf.bak and rebooted. ~/.config/goa-1.0/accounts.conf


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OK, I fixed it. This is what I did: I had a bit over a half of the space on the disk free, so with gparted, I divided the free space on the disk into a new, slightly larger partition (ext4). After that I moved the contents of the encrypted partition there. It asked the password a few times along the way. Then I deleted the remaining encrypted partition. ...


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First of all, this is a bad thing security wise! And you are using a Arch Linux instruction on Ubuntu.... The Ubuntu way is: Step 1 Run update command to update package repositories and get latest package information. sudo apt-get update -y Step 2 Run the install command with -y flag to quickly install the packages and dependencies. sudo apt-get ...


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Fixed by doing: pam-auth-update --force


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Here is a good solution, just one line: useradd -p $(openssl passwd -1 "$pass") "$user" I can add others parameters like -m to create the home directoty, etc.


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Assuming that your root MySQL user has unix_socket authentication enabled, then NO; a non-root, non-sudo user can NOT access your MySQL root user account at all. If someone can get root (Linux user) access to your machine, then they can access your MySQL root user account, regardless of which authentication method you use. E.g. the root user can (re)start ...


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Whoever had the laptop before you, assuming that it is used, did not factory reset it. I suggest re-installing Ubuntu, as it will take an eternity to actually get the password, Or contact the person who had it before you, if you can. I hope this is a help, and not a hindrance.


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MY SECOND ANSWER After adding my own solution for my specific Black Screen problem I found out I had to solve the screensaver lockscreen with this simple command line dconf write /org/gnome/desktop/screensaver/lock-enabled false or with the GUI method, by going to the same path with Dconf Editor and unchecking lock-enabled


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Even after being able to get to the normal-user desktop (by sheer luck) and unchecking Automatic Access this issue wasn't resolved at all. After rebooting I wasn't able to reach normal-user desktop again with the same steps I described (who knows what sheer luck logged me in with Ctrl + Alt + F1 / F2 / Canc) So I tried to login in Recovery Mode, got to the ...


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MY FIRST ANSWER For the moment I achieved to delete the normal-user password by adapting this similar case answer to mine by running this form terminal su - my-admin-user sudo passwd -d my-normal-user here's a quote from man passwd -d, --delete Delete a user's password (make it empty). This is a quick way to disable a password for an account. It ...


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