New answers tagged

1

Currently, at least on OpenSuse Tumbleweed, you're required to enter the LUKS password twice: once to decrypt /boot and once to decrypt your other partitions (assuming you use the same password for all partitions). In the early unlock, Grub2 also defaults to a US English keyboard layout, so you can't type in Dvorak or German or whatever your normal layout ...


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Before shrinking a Windows volume,it's a good idea to use Windows disk defragmentation before shrinking the partition, as Windows will put the files together at the beginning of the disk. Then, as others mentioned earlier, you can use gparted, but also you must have ntfs support: sudo apt install ntfs-3g ntfs-config gparted -y Also, be sure your Windows ...


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If the BIOS recognizes the SSD at boot then it will lock it. The information you posted shows the SSD is locked. I would suggest the following: Turn the laptop off. Unplug the SSD. Turn the laptop on. Wait for system to boot to desktop. Plug back the SSD Try formatting it. Best of luck.


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Make sure that you have a good backup of your important Ubuntu files, as this procedure can corrupt or loose data. Keep these things in mind: always start the entire procedure with issuing a swapoff on any mounted swap partitions, and end the entire procedure with issuing a swapon on that same swap partition a move is done by pointing the mouse pointer at ...


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GParted doesn't allow you to modify partitions when they are active. Boot from a LiveUSB and launch GParted from there, it should work.


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I would suggest trying to use the boot-repair utility from an Ubuntu distro (there is a chance it might not work, it will also warn you if the boot partition is too far away from the start of the drive, some older BIOS stuff won't look at the whole drive) sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-...


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sudo apt purge $(dpkg -l | egrep '^rc' | awk '{print $2}') if apt is blocked sudo dpkg -P $(dpkg -l | egrep '^rc' | awk '{print $2}') The problem by sudo autoremove is , it let configurations-file on system. Sometimes in /var/lib/initramfs-tools/ so update-initramfs always build initramfs for removed Kernel. But the /boot partition is really small.


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For newbies like me... I want to add this When loading the system. You can see the logo KUBUNTU. You can press the up arrow once and then you see what the system is actually doing at the moment. There was a line in RED Time Timed out waiting for device /dev/sdc1 There were another in Yellow DEPEND Dependency failed for /HDD DEPEND Dependency failed ...


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Before you extend the partition, you can move it to the left. This is done by selecting Resize/Move, and then clicking the coloured element that represents the data, and dragging it to the left. In order to move or resize the root partition, you'll have to load Linux without loading/mounting the root partition. You can do this by loading up a LiveCD of ...


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The solution to this problem was given by oldfred in his comment, also in step 8 in the question Acer Aspire E15 will not dual boot. The issue was in the BIOS the SATA Mode setting was set to RST with Optane. Once I set the SATA mode to AHCI Ubuntu was able to recognize the SSD.


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Just as Fabby said, you have to stop the array before making any changes. I did not have that in mind, thank you Fabby. Here is the solution step by step: # mdadm -S /dev/md0 # mdadm /dev/md0 -r /dev/sda # dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=1M count=1024 after changes # rm /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf


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This looks like an XY problem. If all you want to have is a fully restorable image of your system just: Install CloneZilla Live as a bootable ISO Go to the grub menu and boot CloneZilla Live Use the device-image option Save your boot disk. If you ever need to restore, go to step 4 and chose Restore instead of Save. If my assumption is incorrect, leave a ...


2

It's backup time! If you don't want to lose any of your data, stop trying to boot or change Windows and boot an Ubuntu live USB stick in Try Ubuntu mode and copy all of the data onto an external HDD. (you'll find all of your Windows disks can be mounted from said USB stick) and then: Install Windows again (off-topic here, but on-topic there ) Restore your ...


2

TL;DR: You're using a gpt partition table which doesn't have the limitations the msdos partition table has: Just create a single large (Primary) partition if you need to and be done with it. The long version: It's all about history and back in the stone age when I was a kid and dinosaurs still roamed the Earth, an msdos partition table could just have 4 ...


1

In order to resize the Android partition of your mobile device, basically, these are the steps you'll need to follow: Connect your Android device to your PC. Open a terminal. 2a. Reboot into recovery mode. (optional, depends on the partition you plan to modify) Use adb to connect to your device. Launch GParted (sudo apt install gparted) partition editor. ...


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I could solve the problem by Activating UEFI boot ( it was working with Legacy since UEFI is not recommended for my HP) Changing boot priority order in UEFI to OS Boot Manager at top I did not have enough time to try the other solutions, but I appreciate them as well.


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Any time you use dd (a.k.a. disk destroyer) there is a potential for messing up your data. dd has no safeguards for accidentally writing your new drive over the old drive. The only thing keeping it working right is if you're VERY careful with typing the commands correctly and not mixing up the source and destinations. if= and of= are only one small mistyped ...


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I would use partimage to copy the partitions one at a time. After you copy the first partition, increase its size. The resize will be very fast because you won't have to move any adjacent partitions. Then copy the second partition and resize it to fit the rest of the space. The easiest way to do this is to boot from SystemRescueCD and do everything from ...


2

Windows 10 Anniversary Update, and the more recent Windows 10 Creators Update, have a really bad habit of wiping out Linux partitions on MBR disks. Microsoft has known about this bug for quite some time, but has chosen not to fix it. Sounds like you're a victim. Recovery is possible, but it can be tricky. Boot to the Ubuntu Live DVD/USB. Open Software &...


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It depends on your partitioning scheme: If your Windows and Ubuntu partitions are separate: No issue, but make a full system backup using CloneZilla Live anyway. If you have something completely different from the standard or any of the partitioning options in the above question, definitely make a full system backup using CloneZilla Live!!!


1

As Neo said it is possible to upgrade your Ubuntu to 18.04 without affecting the Windows partition. You can use any of the method you stated yourself. Since both OS are in different partition they wont interfere with other partitions unless specified to do so. In my opinion it is better to turn off the Firewall temporarily than to make a custom rule to ...


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You can upgrade your Ubuntu using terminal and it will not affect your other partitions. You can do that with: sudo do-release-upgrade See how to do that in detail here. Even if you install the newer or other version using live disk it will not affect your Windows unless you erase the whole HDD or edit the partitioning of your HDD. See how to do that here....


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In UBUNTU the ssd will have nvme0n[n1]p[n2] as device name and the hdd will have sd[c1][n2] where [n1] is the hard disk number, [n2] is the partition number, [c1] is a letter indicating the hard disk number. Mind that this is related to a HP Omen. Other systems might have an older ssd version: nvme is a M.2 SSD. That is a newer type of SSD. Info from my hp ...


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There is a guide located here... https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/advanced-installation.html Look it over and if you need help with any part of it let me know.


1

Yes, you should be able to do it since you have a seperate /home partition. This tutorial should be of help. As always make sure you backup your important data things can go wrong. Back up to the cloud or external media. Good Luck.


0

Thanks to all who responded. Great ideas and thanks for all the links. I think I'll make an image of the Windows install so I don't have to go through the hassle of downloading all the specific drivers. Then I'll partition as needed and apparently I need to make sure the Ubuntu partition is UEFI. Headed out on vaca for a few weeks so I'll give it a try when ...


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I fixed it. I think it was: sudo apt-get install ntfsfix ntfsfix /dev/sda3 I think that's the one that did it. Credit to https://linuxacademy.com/blog/linux/ntfs-partition-repair-and-recovery-in-linux/ https://www.thegeekstuff.com/2012/08/fsck-command-examples was of some help too, but fsck didn't get me there.


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You should be using Rufus to create your installation medium. be sure to configure it to use GPT and UEFI : leave it on Fat32 and things should run much more smoothly from there. ideally, before rebooting to the ubuntu USB and installing, open up a powershell run as Administrator and type: powercfg -h off this will ensure hard drives are shutdown ...


0

This post may be of help to you. I would recommend keeping your /home folder on the SSD also and use the HDD for extra storage, The reason I say that is a lot of programs use the /home folder for hidden config files and if they have to get it from the HDD you'll notice a slowdown in those programs. But the choice is yours.


0

This has worked for me all days: Check disk e2fsck -ff /dev/vg0/test-disk Resize filesystem to 4G: resize2fs /dev/vg0/test-disk 4G Check disk again just for the sake of it (first command). Remember to backup important files.


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Boot-Repair should provide an easy, semi-automated solution here. Detach your old drive from the VM (to prevent adding further steps at the end). Boot a live CD and run the recommended repair in Boot-Repair. Power off the VM and detach the live CD. Your new drive should boot normally. Fix your /etc/fstab if necessary. It should point to your actual root ...


1

I think 40gb is enough for root file system. 1tb hard drive was partitioned well enough but not mounted correctly. In current scheme your personal files(aside of system files) was reside on the root partition. /dev/sda5 that mounted on /media/neil/HOME should be mounted on /home. I assume the username you're using was Neil. You should make folder on /media/...


1

What's wrong with 'du -sh /*' ? It will show you what root folder takes up the space, then you can go from there. Though I agree most probably your home folder is on the wrong partition.. you could check with 'echo ~neil'


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You've have 100 MB of space for the partition boot-repair requested but it is still unallocated. This is how mine looks: The first step is to select the unallocated space and create partition with type of fat32. The second step is to select Partition from top menu and then Manage flags from drop down menu:


5

Let's see: /dev/sda7 38G 35G 989M 98% / /dev/sda4 487M 0 487M 0% /media/neil/HP_TOOLS /dev/sda5 868G 113M 823G 1% /media/neil/HOME /dev/sda1 200M 30M 170M 15% /media/neil/BOOT All four volumes are on that same 1 terabyte hard drive named /dev/sda. You have a 38G root partition, but your /media/neil/HOME is 868G. ...


11

You have a quite small root partition for system files and applications, most of the disk space is in your home partition for user data. You will either need to clean up the root partition mainly by uninstalling applications, or also removing log and cache files and such things, or you have to modify your partition layout and shrink your home and grow the ...


0

Solved! Wrote the 19.04 iso to a dvd on a Windows computer. Took a few minutes, but it created a live start-up disc. Then put it into the Ubuntu computer and changed the bios to make it boot first using the UEFI option which appeared. The dvd booted live - this took some time, so patience is needed - but once I got the live environment, I was able to use ...


1

The minimum disk space required to install Ubuntu is 10GB, and the recommended disk space is at least 25GB. If the information in the screenshots is correct, you do not have much of an alternative except to do a fresh installation of Ubuntu. Furthermore all the information in the 4 screenshots can't be correct, because the results of Windows Disk Management ...


0

The first thing you should do is to open a terminal in Ubuntu and run sudo update-grub. GRUB will detect other bootable devices on your computer (in this case, SSD1 with Windows) and should display your Windows installation in the terminal output. Next, you should change the GRUB configuration file located at /etc/default/grub by running sudo gedit /etc/...


0

Try ntfsfix. sudo ntfsfix dev/sda1 and I think you should give the partition number in your mount command, dev/sda is the disk and dev/sda1 is normally the first partition.


1

Generally fixing a problem in a specific operating system needs to be fixed from tools that come from that operating system. Mind though that the system claims it is NOT a NTFS volume so NTFS tools will not work. Mind the following questions: Could it be another filesystem? Are you sure you have the ntfs-tools istalled? Otherwise NTFS is an unknown ...


1

The problem is with the BitLocker being enabled for the disk in discussion. Disable the BitLocker encryption by going to: Control Panel > System & Security > BitLocker Drive Encryption > Select - Turn Off BitLocker


0

I was able to install Ubuntu-Mate 18.04.2 desktop with LVM after several tries. I tried as much as possible in the GUI. start Ubuntu-Mate as live desktop. install Synaptic package Manager install lvm2 and partitionmanager (gparted is not good enough for lvm handling) type in terminal: "sudo partionmanager" This should start the partionmanager as root. ...


0

Open the terminal and write the command sudo fdisk -l It will show your file system identify the partition you want permission for read and write then type the command and give the partition name like this sudo ntfsfix /dev/sda3


2

You've got a single SSD/HDD set up in RAID mode, and the Ubuntu installer won't recognize your SSD until you switch your disk setting in the BIOS from RAID to AHCI. Making that switch comes with some problems though, as Windows will no longer boot. You don't need to reinstall Windows... Below, you'll find two different ways to solve this problem. Make ...


1

You've got a single SSD set up in RAID mode, and the Ubuntu installer won't recognize your SSD until you switch your disk setting in the BIOS from RAID to AHCI. Making that switch comes with some problems though, as Windows will no longer boot. You don't need to reinstall Windows... Below, you'll find two different ways to solve this problem. Make sure ...


0

FIXED. Good grief what a pain. Short answer: fixed with boot-repair and selecting ATA disk support Long answer: replacing/upgrading software RAID1 to larger drives with GPT is doable but tricky. First step: make a bootable USB for your system. Not a rescue/livecd - you may want to have one anyway but make sure your own system is bootable from USB. ...


0

GRUB does not support LUKS2 yet. If your /boot directory is on a LUKS-encrypted device and you use GRUB as your bootloader, it won't work. [minor point] Older cryptsetup (1.x.y) can't process LUKS2, so Live CD/USBs with a version of cryptsetup before 2 can't be used to decrypt LUKS2 partitions.


1

Notice on the lef hand side of the partitions the little "key" icon. That means that the partition is locked and that's why you can't resize it. The reason it's locked is because it's mounted; it's mounted when you boot. Here's the easiest way to do what you want: boot from a live Ubuntu CD which won't automatically mount the hard drive partitions. When you ...


0

You can use gdisk for partitions bigger than 2TB. Example: # gdisk /dev/xvdk GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 0.8.6 Partition table scan: MBR: not present BSD: not present APM: not present GPT: not present Creating new GPT entries. Command (? for help): n Partition number (...


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