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I got it done. I changed the respective drive Partition Type to 'Basic Data' and change the partition type to 'NTFS'.


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Yes, you can do what you are describing. I do exactly the same myself, install the OS on an SSD partition unencrypted, and mount an encrypted partition into /home/$USER. Start by installing the system on your SSD partition as usual, choose your username (I assume username below) and then boot into your new system. After that there are basically four steps ...


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Q: What happened to my disk when formatting? I right clicked and selected format on my external drive in nautilus. Nothing happened and the disk disappeared. A: It takes time and the disk returns when formatting completes. I opted to erase and it looks like it takes roughly 80 minutes / TB. To view the progress you can open gnome-disk-utility (in i3 or from ...


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The Key next to the partition in gparted indicates that the drive is mounted (in use). So, you need to "unmount" them to be resized. You cannot unmount root partition if you are booting from it. It is usually better to do partition changes from a Live media/pendrive Hope it helps.


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I can see only one instance of grub installed on your system and this instance is installed to your EFI System Partition /dev/nvme1n1p2 (SSD1 - OLD). If you remove the drive which holds the EFI System Partition you will be unable to boot either OS on this machine. Installing an instance of Grub to the OS-partition does only make sense in legacy-mode, but not ...


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The easiest option to change your default download directory would be to delete your current Downloads folder and then put a symbolic link in place that redirects to your new drive. Procedure with GUI With the file manager, proceed as following: Delete "Downloads" Create a symbolic link named "Downloads", that links to your other drive. ...


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I know it is something people are rather lax about now, but there may be some good sense, long-term, in placing certain things on different partitions. The purpose is to exercise some control over space use; even on a laptop there will be programs that keep filling up the disk until you run out of space and have find where the problem is - that is a lot ...


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Fixed it by changing my crypttab to the UUID... I can see the cryptab entry was renamed 'backup' which is what I renamed it to when I was messing around. Seem to be booting okay for now.


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So, after trying the solution proposed by @vanadium to no avail, I reasoned that in the absence of shock to the drive or creaky noises, and given the fact that I had interrupted a windows update, this was probably a logical failure caused by an I/O error. I burned a live USB stick with SystemRescueCD, a special purpose linux distribution which comes with ...


3

If the disk has been unmounted, via Nautilus (using the eject icon), open the Disks application, select the disk to power down in the left pane, then click either of the icons marked below, to spin down the drive and power off, and then it can be safely unplugged from USB...


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You can do this with hdparm: Open Terminal (if it’s not already open) Spin down the device: hdparm -y /dev/sdb Note: Be sure to replace sdb with the actual device you’d like to spin down. You can use this command whenever you’d like to have the drive power down. If it’s mounted and an application wants to read from it, then the drive will spin up again.


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Programs generally get installed to the root partition, unless you are doing something really fancy. As a beginner (only beginners ask this common question), you won't able to change the location that applications install to. So don't scrimp on your root (/) partition size. Opinion: If your root (/) and /home are on the same disk, then there seems no point ...


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To properly fsck a file system, here's the correct way... boot to a Ubuntu Live DVD/USB in “Try Ubuntu” mode open a terminal window by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T type sudo fdisk -l identify the /dev/sdXX device name for your "Linux Filesystem" type sudo fsck -f /dev/sdXX, replacing sdXX with the number you found earlier repeat the fsck command if there ...


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You have a few options. You can physically disconnect the disk with Windows before installing Ubuntu so that you can use this "Erase disk and install Ubuntu" option, then reconnect the disk after installation. You will need to update GRUB so that Windows is an option in the GRUB bootloader. But the better option would be to format the disk with ...


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There is a great Live ISO called Boot-Repair-Disk. It has Gparted and other useful tools precompiled, so you can manage your disks and partitions. The Boot-Repar tool will help you to rebuild the boot record and the /boot. It supports EFI too. A. (in case of Physical PC) Make a Boot-Repair Live USB media with dd in Linux or Rufus in Windows; B. (in case of ...


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As you indicate in your question, your one partition that was automatically created during installation is in use. You cannot change a partition that is in use. To change the partitioning on this drive, you will need to work from a live session, i.e., a session started from an installation DVD or USB. More advanced users can do this at the terminal from a ...


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I was able to clean up this RAID+LVM-solution to work for LVM only. The solution involves setting up the partitions manually before running the installer. The detailed instructions are found below. 1. Download the installer and boot into Ubuntu Live 1.1 Download Download the Ubuntu Desktop installer from https://ubuntu.com/download/desktop and put it onto a ...


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For information only... I finally ended up by re-installing Ubuntu on the local drive, while the external drive was unpluged. Now it is working. I wish I could boot-repaired it. I started re-installing every software from scratch. At least now, it is working like a charm!


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Don't know if the problem is about btrfs, the problems was persisting, the problem avoid me to work with the computer normally. I had reinstalled kubuntu 21.04 in the root partition now with ext4 file format. I tryed to install kde neon but it doesn't recognize the existed /efi/boot partition there and always showed me the message "the system need a efi/...


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It will depend on what the damage is with the file system and eventually the partition. Even if the system will not boot, the file system may still be readable. I would start a live session from an installation DVD or USB, and then try to mount the volume where the files are in read only mode. If that succeeds, you will be able to copy the files off to ...


2

Well I managed to get it to extend the LV with lvextend -l+100%FREE /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv -A n :) It was the autobackup that blocked the LV to extend because it was so full. So -A n sets the autobackup to no in case somebody encounters the same problem.


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Indeed the problem seems to have been having two different drives with the same name. It is probably possible to follow a variant of the instructions above to rename the LVM of the root partition but what I ended up doing to solve the problem was much simpler. I connected the old hard drive to a friend's computer which didn't have such a logical volume (wasn'...


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This script will unmount then remount the var mount point as read-write. sudo umount /var sudo mount -o remount,rw /var EDIT: The problem can mean that your drive is failing or can mean that var mount point is just read-only


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In other operating systems than Windows we create mountpoints. A mountpoint can be a directory, but also a partition. The root filesystem has / as its mountpoint. You can have /home/ as a mountpoint on the same disk and you can have a /discworld/ as a mountpoint for a complete 2nd hard disk (a hdd for instance where / is on an sdd). Mountpoints are shown in ...


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Note: Windows can read Linux ext2/3/4 partitions with the addition of a Windows driver... but DON'T do it, 'cause it'll surely corrupt the Linux file system. Here's the safe way to do it... Connect the old Ubuntu drive via a USB->SATA cable. Note: Some USB->SATA converters can't read/write to previously formatted drives without a reformat (thereby ...


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Probably a dumb question looking back, I just made a Windows 10 Bootdrive and executed chkdsk /F [myPartition] as ntfsresize suggested. Now everything works. Still thanks for replying @user10489


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To successfully boot linux, you have to have the bootloader on a bootable disk. Typically, this is your first disk. If you have an EFI system with an EFI partition on the primary disk, linux can install its bootloader in the same EFI partition that windows uses. If you have a legacy system with a MBR format partition table on the primary disk, you have to ...


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ntfsresize resizes the filesystem, but not the partition. You have to separately resize the partition. It's a bit tricky to get the math right to resize the partition, so rather than take the risk of getting it too small and damaging the filesystem, when I was using the command line tools to do this, I would resize the filesystem, and then shrink the ...


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Shrinking a .vdi is pretty straightforward, but will require that you intentionally “fill the device to capacity”. The basic process works like this: Uninstall any applications and delete any files you may not need anymore Create a giant file consisting of only zeroes on the storage device you want to shrink Let the file fill the entire device (this will ...


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GUI approach On ubuntu Open Disks. Then go the the drive you want to add swap on. Click on add partition, then choose the number of GB you need Click on next, then as on type choose other, then next. Choose Linux swap partition and proceed On completion, mount the drive as swap. By clicking on the mount button Checkout the image


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First, you will need to Create a partition in the free space Format that partition so it contains a file system Al of this can be done with the utility "Gnome Disks", installed by default in default Ubuntu with the Gnome desktop, or with Gparted, available by default in a live Ubuntu session started from an installation USB/DVD. Because you are ...


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If you are using LVM, you could extend the logical volume that Ubuntu is installed on. This can be achieved with the following: create a new partition in the free space: use gparted or fdisk Create a new LVM physical volume(PV): pvcreate /dev/sdb6 Add the PV to the LVM Volume Group(VG): vgextend vg-ubuntu /dev/sdb6 Extend the LVM Logical Volume(LV): ...


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Normaly you have to add a efi-partition on your SSD, 100MByte would be okay. I use Linux for more than 12 years now and separate /boot and /home was not useful. You should add on your SSD: efi-partition (100MByte as fat32 - Mounted as /boot/efi) / Partition ~480GByte (with home and boot) On your HDD you can put all your personal stuff. I have created a ...


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SUBJECT TO DATA LOSS First of all check on what drive is windows on it may be sda1 or sda2 or any sdax then Get a pendrive Download the Gparted iso from https://gparted.org/download.php And then download Unetbootin and make the pendrive bootable with the gparted iso you downloaded insert the pendrive and then reboot, before it shows the grub, press F12 or ...


1

This is a very similar question to Will all my files be deleted if I choose 'Erase disk and Install Ubuntu' when installing in a VMWare virtual machine? although that one seems to be from the Ubuntu 18 era. I just went through the process again on Ubuntu 20.04 with two drives: one with an old Ubuntu installation I wanted to replace and a second with ...


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It looks like your filesystem inside the LVM isn't taking up the available space. example 200GB LVM utilising half the disk, which is the default when you install ubuntu server for example. vgdisplay VG Size <199.00 GiB Alloc PE / Size 25472 / 99.50 Gib Free PE / Size 25471 / <99.50 GiB lsblk └─sda3 8:...


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For those interested I have expanded on this fix in great detail in this video of my enlarging an Ubuntu Server on virtual box. I find it helpful to have a virtual machine running ubuntu desktop with all the utilities needed, simply attached your servers virtual hard drive to thi smachine so it can be worked on. https://youtu.be/Ow5Y4iqe7MQ IMPORTNAT: This ...


1

It has to do with the timezone of your system. GParted live, for instance, boots with UTC timezone. If you are in GMT+something timezone, then the last time the partition was mounted is in the future. Therefore, running e2fsck does not update the date that resize2fs is checking to insure that the partition was checked. Setting a date in the future, or ...


0

First, boot into Ubuntu. You can easily install grub from a regular Ubuntu session (not a live session) using the following commands: sudo grub-install /dev/sda sudo update-grub This assumes you have only one hard drive or SSD and that this drive is the default /dev/sda. As far as I know, grub will not show up when you run sudo fdisk -l. However, you can ...


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OK I finally found the missing step. All that was remaining to do was sudo resize2fs /dev/nvme0n1p3 Now df -h returns this /dev/nvme0n1p3 916G 145G 731G 17% / Hope this helps someone else


2

Make sure that you have a good backup of your important Ubuntu files, as this procedure can corrupt or lose data. Keep these things in mind: always start the entire procedure with issuing a swapoff on any mounted swap partitions, and end the entire procedure with issuing a swapon on that same swap partition a move is done by pointing the mouse pointer at ...


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It is not trivial to make sda6 use the free space, because it comes before that partition rather than after it. A move of sda6 is therefore required. This can be a lengthy process that may fail. Take following steps from a live session so none of the partitions on the drive are in use. Do not start this before your backup of your user data is up to date. ...


4

I managed to recover all my data after applying e2fsck and referencing the fourth superblock. This created a device dev/sda which I was able to mount directly and lift all the data off the disk. There was no reference to dev/sda1 partition in this instance. Rebooting the computer causes the disk to revert back to the 16MB windows reserved partition and ...


-1

You can't resize the partition because the unallocated space is not adjacent to the sda6 partition. if you are not using the sda7 partition, then you can delete it and then try to resize the sda6. Make sure you are not using the sda7 before doing the above and make sure you have backed up your data.


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Yes, you can. Still, it is recommended to have your operating systems all on the fastest drive, i.e., the SSD drive. This is what really makes for a general perceived strong increase in speed of your computer. In contrast, loading e.g. a Writer document from a slower drive will not "feel" much slower, except for very large files. Even with an SSD ...


0

tl;dr ntfsresize & gparted (which uses ntfsresize) should work perfectly fine for resizing ntfs filesystems but if you have access to Windows, that should work well too. To address the answer stating that Windows is often unable to defrag + resize partitions - This is true, but usually only applies if you're trying to resize the system (C:) drive while ...


2

You're right. You can't unmount and resize a partition that is currently in use. You can easily use Gparted Live. It's a small bootable Linux that you can boot from USB or CD. Then you can easily do whatever you want with your disk and be sure that disk is not in use.


0

EDIT: Thanks for the the mistake pointed by C.S. Cameron. I am trying to correct my answer accordingly. I had not installed windows for a long time through live usb. But there should be an option of partitioning the SSD through the partition manager present in the installer. That way, main OS partition can be resized. If that option is not present in Windows ...


0

I was able to fix it using the LVM tools by: Displaying the logical volume information sudo lvdisplay Extending my ubuntu-lv logical volume (yours may be named differently) sudo lvextend -l +100%FREE /dev/ubuntu-vg/ubuntu-lv Resizing the file system sudo resize2fs /dev/ubuntu-vg/ubuntu-lv


2

If you want to change directory to [the file system in] your second drive, 'to-drive-two', I suggest the following alias: alias 22='cd /media/my-user-name/partition-name/directory-name' Store it along with the already existing aliases in your bash configuration file ~/.bashrc. (Activate in the current terminal window with source ~/.bashrc; It will be ...


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