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After disabling Optane from Intel's RAID software, as we as from BIOS, all the partitions are visible when you live boot, so its safe install. Please Note: Windows might crash when you disable optane, so keep a windows bootable ready too, if you need to reinstall it.


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You should definitely use LUKS2 whenever possible. It is the newer header format and overcomes the limits of the (legacy) LUKS1 header. It is the default since cryptsetup version 2.1, but this alone doesn't say much. The Password-Based Key Derivation Function (PBKDF) is the big change. If you use the PBKDF2 algorithm it doesn't really matter if you have a ...


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ext4 reserves a portion of space, typically 5%, to avoid fragmentation and for system services. This is specific to ext4 See How To Free Reserved Space On EXT4 Partitions. But use it at your own risk. This should explain why the total partition size you see by both apps don't match. gparted reports the total partition size, while dh ignores the reserved ...


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Your problem is not that there is a missing mount button. Your problem is that currently, your partition is corrupt because of your unintentional attempt to format it. You (unintentionally) started formatting. Thus, a new file system was being created. However, you interrupted the process. As a result, the new file system being created is not properly ...


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As of 15Jul2020, there is no option to check filesystem integrity of a Hard disk formatted as NTFS under Linux. What I did? I downloaded the free trial of Windows Enterprise as ISO sudo apt-get remove Virtualbox virtualbox-dkms virtualbox* Install the latest Virtualbox from here Download the matched version of Virtualbox extpack Add to disk group, me, as ...


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You can't install Ubuntu onto a USB stick which works on one system and automatically assume it will work on another system. If you had created a live USB stick you could assume it will boot on another system. I'd suggest creating a regular Live USB stick and boot with that. For a trial run you can make a persistent Live USB stick instead of installing your ...


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Some steps to check before installing from a liveUSB installer: Enter your firmware and check/set the following options: Fast boot : Disabled (this leaves initialization of a lot of devices to the installed OS often preventing booting a live environment other than DOS) Secure boot : Disabled (Can also prevent booting from USB devices or anything else then ...


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It seems to me that your computer gets stuck when starting X. The startup image of your motherboard with the circle means the framebuffer boot is working (you can press Esc during that loading screen to see what's happening) but likely gets stuck when the display manager is starting. What is your current GPU? My suggestion would be to try starting with safe ...


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Had a very similar issue after an update of Ubuntu 20.04 on a Dell XPS13 (2020). Searched for hours, the solution was actually super easy. reboot and go to BIOS using "fn and F2" BIOS > System Configuration > Sata Operation > switch to "AHCI" from "RAID On" For some reason this BIOS settings was switched.


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The .....data00 partition is mounted at /data00. That means that you can access it in your file manager by going to “other locations” and then choose computer. /data00 will appear as a folder called data00. You can move data there via copy and paste using the file manager. Alternatively you can use the mv command to move or the cp command to copy using the ...


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You can use the famous rsync. Read rsync - Community Help Wiki. Example: rsync --stats --delete -avzh /source/dir /dest/dir Be aware of the --delete option matching mirroring needs (not archiving). For syncing to/from a cloud storage, see https://rclone.org/


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The Windows partition should be called (Windows SyS Drive) in Gnome Disks in Ubuntu!


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No need! Just select automatic during installation! This will automatically make Home and Root partitions! There is also no need for a swap partition as there is already a swapfile!


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If you are sure that the USB is a live installation media, than you can try spamming the boot menu button, which seems to be the f11 key while the computer is booting up. This will prompt you for a boot menu to select the boot device you'd like to use. At that point choose USB or the San Disk Cruzer Glide 32GB and let the installation continue. Once you have ...


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Thank you @jdurston for your reply, I was able to install Ubuntu 20.04 with RAID 1 and encrypted disks in this way. I have prepared both the hard drives using "GParted Live" (I created a bootable USB with the GParted ISO): Disk 1: 512 MB partition, named "/bios/efi", fat32, flagged as "bios_grub"; 10 GB / partition, named "...


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Start by backing up any important data. Make sure you boot into the 18.04 install and run GParted. Identify the partition with the 20.04 install. If you are running the 18.04 install its partition(s) will be locked. Select the 20.04 install and delete. Don’t be tempted to delete any other partitions that you are unsure of. If you go ahead with the upgrade to ...


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So the answer is that you have moved your file and renamed it as sda3. so to revert open terminal at same location where you earlier opened it and run: sudo mv /dev/sda3 miras.txt /dev/sda3 was a special node file that would otherwise be used to mount your USB disk. But you have replaced it with a *.txt file. As your miras.txt file was in Home folder you no ...


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That is going to take a LONG time and it is going to warn you that it is risky because it has to move 3 partitions to the right (the swap and two microsoft partitions)... If the unallocated space was on the right directly next to the partition you wanted to grow, then it ('shifting it to the left') would go fairly fast and with less risk.... BUT it is an ...


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You can first delete the NTFS primary partition. Then delete the EFI system partition (usually 100 MB) and then ddelete the Recovery partition. Windows created partitions will now be removed and also the windows boot manager.


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I experienced a similar problem. After no luck with various permutations in a VM I stumbled across this thread on Reddit, where user wRAR_ says '[Debian installer] currently doesn't support encrypted /boot'. Ubuntu is based on Debian; I don't know to what extent the installers are similar, but I tested both in a VM, with and without encrypted /boot. Both ...


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You cannot proceed without making significant changes to your system. One way is to backup everything, wipe the disk, set up GPT partitioning and restore. You will then have no practical limit on the number of partitions. Another is to backup everything and choose one partition to delete. You can then create an extended partition and a few logical partitions ...


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After much research and help from the folks on the Freenode #Ubuntu IRC channel I have an answer. I ended up re-installing due to all the research and failed attempts. I've shared my process below. For those who will use this to migrate to RAID use rsync -avP --numeric-ids --delete-during /path/from/ /path/to/ for cloning your installed operating system ...


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Any and all media that is "External" will be dev/sdb! Any and all media that is "Internal" will be dev/sda


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Add GParted menuentry to GRUB If all else fails, put your GParted ISO in a folder named ISOs in the root directory and boot using GRUB2 and the following menuentry: menuentry "GParted 64-bit ISO" { set root=(hd0,1) set isofile="/ISOs/gparted-live-1.1.0-5-amd64.iso" loopback loop $isofile linux (loop)/live/vmlinuz boot=live config ...


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Extend computer Partition You should boot from a Live USB, not the OS whose partition is being worked on. Open GParted, select the HDD from the dropdown upper right. Right click the 150GB partition and select Delete. Click the green Apply check mark. Right click the 40GB partition and select Resize/Move. Stretch the partition to fill the empty space, ...


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Make a Live USB with the persistent partition in main, internal Hard Drive. A Persistent USB will use the first Persistent partition it sees. Usually a persistent partition on the internal HDD is first. The Persistent partition needs to be an ext partition, say ext4. The partition should be labelled casper-rw, (Labelling it writable is optional for 20.04)....


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After creating the partition (say under /dev/sda4) you can type sudo mount /dev/sda4 /mnt and you will be able to mount the partition inside /mnt. Then you can cd into /mnt and access the partition. You can also create your own mount point. For example sudo mkdir /mnt/sda4 and then run sudo mount /dev/sda4 /mnt/sda4 to mount.


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I was getting a "similar" error after install a few packages, similar as I am not running ZFS, but same error message. I search and found your issue. Here is my error (see below). I was able to get fix by following answer here, New to Linux, I'm getting this recurring error "ERROR "update-grub" returned an error: exit status 1 &...


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Every partition question is individual, and what's more: different options are possible, and the choice between these is to an important extent a matter of preference on how you want to organize. A partition of 30GB for a linux system is plenty. You do run out of space because you also keep user data there. If you would move out all your user data, you would ...


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Thanks @PonJar for the link. Using askubuntu.com/questions/1028375/deleted-ubuntu-efi I was able to fix it. If you face this error grub-install: error: /boot/efi doesn't look like an EFI partition during grub installation step, just do mount /dev/sdaxy /boot/efi again. This will fix it.


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I finally managed to fix it. It was a long ride. I think (while I'm not sure) that it was due to several issues : Grub that installed both as UEFI and Legacy boot Corrupted Grub that would not entirely uninstall, and would generate bad configuration files at each update Corrupted EFI partition resulting from attemps to fix it Corrupted kernel headers in my /...


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Don't select the NTFS partition at installation stage. Leave it alone. After Ubuntu is installed, you'll be able to use that partition and/or mount it permanently somewhere. Note: Having an NTFS partition on a system that doesn't have Windows installed is a bad idea. You won't be able to repair it properly if there is a problem. I recommend to backup the ...


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Obviously, Ubuntu 20.04 lacks the capability of detecting old disk configuration like the Ubuntu 16.04 does. I saw at least one post who had the same problem on this Ubuntu 20.04 live ISO installation. I am not asking for troubleshooting. I am asking to create another version of Ubuntu server 20.XX to have the ability to detect multi-boot partitions and ...


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In the future, it is advised to stick to a single question and your question may get closed for asking multiple questions but I will go ahead and answer. Personally, I would recommend using at least half your drive for Ubuntu but that depends on how much you plan on using Windows in the future and how much you plan on using Ubuntu. If you plan on primarily ...


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This is because your disk format is MBR (Master Boot Record) an dit supports only 4 primary partiitons. You can check it from Windows Disk management tool by Right Click Disk 0 on the left -> select Properties -> In that Volume Tab. You can see either Master Boor Record or Guided Partiiton Table (GPT). If it is GPT, which is a new disk partition ...


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You do not need commands. You can do all this with gparted. However, the operation you are looking for involves moving partitions. That will take a long time, and there is a serious chance that it does not succeed correctly. It would be less painfull with better change on success to Make sure your backup of sda2 is up to date Delete sda1 and sda2 Create a ...


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Solved with diskinternals partition recovery and diskinternals linux reader


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You have a bit of a mess on your hands. Let me explain. You have a smallish 500G HDD, formatted with a MBR style partition table. This kind of format can only have 4 partitions max. So they trick the system and usually have 3 primary partitions, and 1 extended partition that can hold a bunch of logical partitions. When installing Ubuntu on a smallish disk, ...


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I just formatted my original ubuntu partition and them booted from the external hard disk restored partition. It booted !!!


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According to Aaron Toponce's guide: You cannot shrink a zpool, only grow it. Source: https://pthree.org/2012/12/04/zfs-administration-part-i-vdevs/ Here is another guide: http://www.resilvered.com/2011/07/how-to-shrink-zfs-root-pool.html It looks like this second guide "shrinks" a pool by creating a new (smaller) pool on a different disk, and ...


2

Do not format or do any other things to your hard disk. Otherwise you may not be able to missing partition and repair a corrupted one. You can recover your overwritten partition table using testdisk. open terminal in live USB and follow steps: sudo apt-get install testdisk now type and run testdisk. Read this page TestDisk Step By Step and read this ...


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These folders are created by the Windows Check Disk file system scans. They have nothing to do with Ubuntu. They may not have been visible on your Windows system, but they are visible on Ubuntu. They may contain data rescued after a Windows system crash, so go through them in case you may miss something.


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It seems the install actually did work, and the conversion from MBR to GPT as well. I found this guide Use Grub Customizer to Change Boot Order & Make Windows Default for GRUB customizer and that showed the Windows Boot Loader. I moved Windows Boot Loader up to just below Ubuntu. After rebooting the GRUB menu showed and I was able to boot into Windows. ...


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Most probably, you shrink a primary drive. If you shrink a primary drive in Windows, you can't use it because it is unusable. So you can solve this problem by shrinking a logical drive in the disk management of Windows and you will see it usable in Ubuntu installation.


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Do you get the Grub screen when you boot. If so then boot with the oldest kernel you have. If that fails then drop to recovery, enable networking and then update and upgrade and then sudo dpkg --configure -a. and or sudo apt install -f


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Negative size does work. 2nd partition is set to size -1 and uses all available space. storage: config: - grub_device: true id: disk-sda path: /dev/sda ptable: gpt type: disk wipe: superblock-recursive - device: disk-sda flag: bios_grub id: partition-0 number: 1 size: 1048576 type: ...


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I solved this issue by using a Windows system to create a bootable USB with the "Media Creation Tool" from the official Windows website. This question is closed here.


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If you delete Windows thoroughly then it should also vanish from the Grub menu after sudo update grub (or after a kernel update, which uses the same command eventually). In some cases it might leave an entry in the UEFI menu but that shouldn't be hard to delete.


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The solution was described here (Thanks for linking Parsa Mousavi). I needed to: sudo lvresize --verbose --resizefs -L -800G /dev/ubuntu-vg/root sudo pvmove --alloc anywhere /dev/sda2:yyyy-end Then I could resize my partitions in gparted. Pvmove was necessary because the free space needed to be moved to the end of the partition, as described in the linked ...


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I did not determine what was wrong, but the Ubuntu boot repair tool seemed to fix things.


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