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If I understand your question correctly, I have the same goal : split tunnelling for my Ubuntu openvpn client. From what I read so far, the network-manager (GUI) within Ubuntu-Gnome does not support such routing settings. It will route everything on the created network interface (tun0). This is a limitation from that software. I did succeed doing that ...


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Accord to the article. you need two machines to complete VPN server.


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Ok, so in the end I was able to solve this problem thanks to a piece of advice from someone I'm working with. Apparently I just needed to change the line: comp-lzo no in my ovpn file to: comp-lzo yes And that solved the problem! This solution did not come up anywhere I searched online so I wanted to be sure to share it here in case it would be useful for ...


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Try sudo vi /run/resolvconf/interface/NetworkManager You ma also use nano editor, Remove or replace nameserver and then run sudo resolvconf -u For more information see this or this.


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Probably, these settings are cleared when you force a network-manager restart. Try sudo service network-manager restart Still a rather brute solution but one level better than pc restart. If it works, it can be automated by putting a script in /etc/NetworkManager/dispatcher.d with contents: #!/bin/sh if [[ "$2"="vpn-down" ]]; then ...


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Desktop icon It is not possible to add a .desktop launcher to all desktops of different users at once. You need to place a file in the "Desktop" folder of each users. That can be scripted, though, to automate the process. Application menu A better way, both from a sysadmin and user point of view, would be to put the launcher in /usr/share/...


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You should be able to see what goes where using the route command. It will tell you what IP addresses get routed where. Here is a common example: $ route Kernel IP routing table Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use Iface default _gateway 0.0.0.0 UG 100 0 0 enp0s31f6 10.0.0.0 0.0....


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Use sudo systemd-resolve --revert --interface vpn0 to reset resolv.conf after getting off the VPN. If that works, you can run it automatically when disconnecting from the VPN by creating /etc/network/if-post-down.d/vpn0 with the following contents: #!/bin/sh if [ "$IFACE" = "vpn0" ]; then systemd-resolve --revert --interface vpn0 fi ...


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Use the following command, where 0 is the tunnel number: sudo ifconfig tun0 down


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First of all you would need to install the OpenVPN client. After that, If you got an *.ovpn file from your vendor, then you can refer to this thread to get a quick start: How to setup OpenVPN Client Otherwise, you would need to refer to "Step 8 — Creating the Client Configuration Infrastructure" as documented in this link: How To Set Up an OpenVPN ...


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