8

Operating systems doesn't care what operating system the router uses. The standards are open and vendor-neutral. In general the relevant standards are: Ethernet for providing physical connectivity. The NIC in your computer has to be supported by the OS you're using, but every Ethernet card can talk to all other Ethernet devices, generally speaking. IPv4, ...


5

A simple answer is NO, there is no simple way to do this. This is the downside of using static IP addresses when dealing with networks. It is way to easy to have 2 or more hosts with the same IP address causing a IP conflict and taking out multiple systems at the same time. Or not having the existing Subnet of the static IP matching the new network it is ...


2

I figured this out. To view the netplan configuration run the following commands. $cd /etc/netplan $sudo nano 50-cloud-init.yaml If the 50-cloud-init.yaml file is blank run the following commands. ^X $sudo netplan generate $sudo netplan apply Now you can edit 50-cloud-init.yaml to manage the wired network. $sudo nano 50-cloud-init.yaml Here is what ...


1

Problem was caused by systemd service: oneshot service is deactivated after script finished and NetworkManager automatically removes interface from dead systemd service. Adding RemainAfterExit=yes option to the service resolved problem.


1

I just booted up to the 19.04 desktop, entered my wifi pw and got connected with no problems. So all is good now. If anyone has any idea why it didn't work in 16.04.3 please let me know, just to sate my curiosity. Thanks everyone. I think I'll enjoy this community. Goodbye Windows! Again...


1

I've been struggling with this exact issue for 2 days before finding the solution that worked for me here: https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/470940 TL;DR $ cd /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections This is where connections created with the Network Manager are stored. $ sudo nmcli connection modify <vpn-connection-name> ipv4.dns-priority -42 ...


1

The answer given by Philip Kirkbride didn't work for me. It appears my device had become blocked with RFkill. I'm running Ubuntu 19.04. Here are the modified steps I followed: List all network devices with ifconfig -a, look for wireless interface. In my case it was wlp3s0. Attempt to turn device on sudo ifconfig wlp3s0 up. This returned an error message ...


1

For me, the answer from spotter was the solution. He worked it out and filed a bug report. https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/network-manager-openvpn/+bug/1847144 To elaborate on the steps to solve the problem: I am using KDE. Possibly the network manager interface is different. This is what I did. Imported the openvpn config file into ...


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