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You're absolutely correct. There's a mismatch between UUIDs. This occurred because of the re-creation of the swap partition. You executed the correct commands to determine this. free -h # show a little more data sudo blkid # show UUIDs cat /etc/fstab # show fstab sudo -H gedit /etc/fstab # edit fstab In /etc/fstab... Change: # swap was on /dev/sda5 ...


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From what you have posted your / aka root partition is mounted on /dev/sda6 which is where your installation exists. Alternatively you can also use findmnt which will give you the mount point of various partitions. If you are on windows generally the big unknown partition block in disk management is where "Ubuntu" or any other linux distro gets ...


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I have written a simple script that does this. It replys on inotify, install it using sudo apt install inotify-tools trash_path="/home/Kenivia/gdrive/.Trash-1004/" move_path="/home/Kenivia/.local/share/Trash" inotifywait -m "$trash_path"files -e create -e moved_to | while read path action file; do mv "$trash_path"files/"$file" $move_path'/...


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When you 'delete' the file, it's being copied to the Trash directory. That much is obvious, but what might not be obvious is that this is a very quick operation because the file stays on the same disk and same partition. If you delete a file and move it to another disk, this will increase the time it takes to delete the file. If deleted files are taking ...


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Changing user-dirs.dirs seems to have no affect. I've also tested in a VM running Mint and it does not change the location of one of the folders. Is there something else that needs to run? Does fstab need another addition? Thanks


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I found out how to do it, i didn't check the man pages well enough man 5 auto.master nobind This is an autofs specific option that is a pseudo mount option and so is given without a leading dash. It may be used either in the master map entry (so it effects all the map entries) or with individual map entries to prevent bind mounting ...


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The "exec" option must be used to execute commands on a mounted disk volume.


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Thanks everyone involved.I know very little on fstab and gksudo. I have the same problem. I did followed @Joe Wicz and have issue fixed. Now it booted fast as always. I follow your instruction it is easy but with little problems. so I write this comment to help other newbies. confirm the issue started after re-partition swap file to install 2nd Lubuntu. ...


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In the 'try ubuntu' desktop, open the command line and run the command : sudo mkfs.vfat /dev/X where X is the name of the efi partition. You can get the name of the partition using: sudo fdisk -l (the word 'efi' appears before the partition name).


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Please keep /home itself at the same disk that has your system files and ONLY move your personal directories. Move the directories in your /home to your new destination and alter ~./config/users-dirs.dirs to reflect this change. Reason: in the case your 2nd disk does not mount your /home is not mounted leaving you with a broken system. I have not yet ...


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Someone already Explain it. Using Snaps for having up-to-date software, we end up paying for it with higher network traffic, more disk usage and slower boot time. If you do not want to use Snaps at all, then remove them with sudo apt-get purge snapd. See more here Details about Snap Mount


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Make sure that you have a good backup of your important Ubuntu files, as this procedure can corrupt or lose data. Keep these things in mind: always start the entire procedure with issuing a swapoff on any mounted swap partitions, and end the entire procedure with issuing a swapon on that same swap partition a move is done by pointing the mouse pointer at ...


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You cannot resize partitions while they are in use, i.e., mounted. The easiest way to repartition is to run an Ubuntu session from the live USB or DVD and do the partitioning from there. In a live session, none of your internal hard drives are mounted by default, and gparted is directly available from a live session. Still, repartitioning is not trivial. If ...


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ajgringo619 corrected your sytax. The only thing remaining is to take possession of the mounted share with a uid=user: sudo mount -t cifs -o rw,user=user,uid=user //ServerIP/share /home/user/documents/share The user in user=user is the user name you pass to the server as credentials. The user in uid=user is the user name on the client that is mounting the ...


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Can you read and see the files on the host system? Is there any unusual file name? Can you open all these files on the host system? Can you mount the samba share manually from command line? Increase the log level in smb.conf and have a look in the smbd.log, nmbd.log


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As of 2020 this is what works for me on Ubuntu 18.04: open the Nautilus file manager press Ctrl+l to write into the address bar insert sftp://your_user_name@target_ip_address where target_ip_address should have the form 102.69.35.384 , then just press Enter to confirm Now you will be asked for the log-in user name and password. That's it, you should now ...


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Add port=the port to the mount command: sudo mount -t cifs -o port=9000,credentials=/root/.credentials,uid=bruni,gid=users,vers=1.0 //localhost/users /home/bruni/mountpoint/


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The standard way to run two or more operating systems at the same time is in a virtual machine application. The operating system that runs on the physical machine's bare metal hardware is the host OS. A guest OS is an operating system that runs inside the virtual machine application. What you're thinking about in your question is that different virtual ...


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For mi work this. There're some post but not work fine with scenario of your question On Host create shared folder XXXX form local path /xxx/xxx/ full access NOT automount and mount in /virtual/mount/folder sudo chmod -aG vboxsf yourusername Read you userid usually 1000 cat /etc/passwd|grep yourusername Add to /etc/fstab mount point sharedname_on_host /xxx/...


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Make sure that you have a good backup of your important Ubuntu files, as this procedure can corrupt or lose data. Keep these things in mind: always start the entire procedure with issuing a swapoff on any mounted swap partitions, and end the entire procedure with issuing a swapon on that same swap partition a move is done by pointing the mouse pointer at ...


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Hello, To fix your issue, you have two options.... Option 1 - Mount the Ubuntu Desktop cdrom/iso within your PXE server As crazy it might sounds, making the cdrom available on the pxe server will prevent the nfsmount error... If you look in the txt.cfg config file, you will see that in the append line, there is a element file=/cdrom/...... This is ...


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04 My zfs was not mounting I did a: sudo zfs import It listed all my unmounted pools but it also gave me a option to mount by zfs name or number I did the import by it's number sudo zfs import ############## and now it auto mounts after every reboot It looks like that number is the uuid of the array and all the drives in the array have the same number ...


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I know the question is old, but a solution would be using bind-mounts and setting the "bind propagation" to "shared". Example: docker run --name mycontainer -it --mount type=bind,source=/some_folder,target=/some_folder,bind-propagation=shared ubuntu bash More info about bind-propagation: https://docs.docker.com/storage/bind-mounts/#configure-bind-...


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Solved (actually kind of workaround): The actual reason for the connection error was the NAS' sleeping HDD (Zyxel NAS326). Solution: Wake up the NAS via somehow accessing its HDD (e.g. use the web interface) or do not let it sleep. Then reboot Ubuntu and the mount works. Note: Without the Ubuntu reboot the mount still does not work (same error code -111). @...


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After the successful execution of mount -t ecryptfs try: sudo ecryptfs-recover-private /home2/.ecryptfs/user/.Private It should decrypt the files of your old home folder (currently mounted as /home2) and make them available in a temporary folder named something like: /tmp/ecryptfs.xyz12345


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Auto-mounting was enabled in the File Manager (non-standard Thunar mod), and this was overriding /etc/fstab. The setting in the File Manager (Volume Management) is all-or-nothing, mount external drives automatically, or don't. So I disabled that, and am controlling things with udev and fstab.


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Auto-mounting was enabled in the File Manager (non-default Thunar), and this was overriding /etc/fstab. The setting in the File Manager (Volume Management) is all-or-nothing, mount external drives automatically, or don't. So I disabled that, and am controlling things with udev and fstab.


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Cables go bad. How did you ensure the cable that you used is good? – user535733> That was it: the USB cable had a bad connector. It is able to send power to the device and recharge it, but not able to connect its data. Thanks for pointing that out. Problem solved.


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In the man fstab page we find the noauto parameter... The fourth field (fs_mntops). This field describes the mount options associated with the filesystem. It is formatted as a comma-separated list of options. It con‐ tains at least the type of mount (ro or rw), plus any additional options ...


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