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FAT/FAT32/exFAT filesystems do not support users per file as common Linux filesystems, AFAIK. So, chown and chgrp will not work. However you can specify a single user/group for all files during mount sudo mount /dev/sdc /mnt/media/ -o uid=1000,gid=1000 (here /dev/sdc is just an example)


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I solve the problem by running below command $ sudo lvm lvm> lvextend -l +100%FREE /dev/ubuntu-vg/ubuntu-lv Size of logical volume ubuntu-vg/ubuntu-lv changed from 100.00 GiB (25600 extents) to <930.01 GiB (238082 extents). Logical volume ubuntu-vg/ubuntu-lv successfully resized. lvm> exit And lsblk command returns nvme0n1 259:...


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This issue was due to the the fact that I used a snap installation of ipfs sudo snap install ipfs which is restricted in scope by the nature of being a snap package. see GitIssue In order to solve this I removed my installation of ipfs and reinstalled with sudo snap install ipfs --classic


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You have to create a new entry in the /etc/fstab file. with this command: sudo blkid you get important information which UUID-number your /dev/sdb1 drive have. Save the number in a text-file. Create the directory for the target path, where you want to mount your new drive. As an example you can chose a folder with the name "mydata" in your ...


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For Windows 9x (95, 98, ME) servers, in addition to vers=1.0, you need to add the servern[etbiosname] switch when invoking mount: mount -t cifs -o vers=1.0,sec=none,user=alice,file_mode=0644,servern=SERVER //server/share /mount/point The value should be the NetBIOS name of the remote server. Here's the documentation of the switch: servernetbiosname=...


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So I got it mounted, I just don't know how I managed it. I downloaded and ran the command sudo dmraid -ay. It returned "no raid discs." I walked away for a few hours, didn't reset, and when I opened the Discs app, suddenly my RAID was there and I could mount it by clicking a button. I think the dmraid must have done it, even though it said it didn'...


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Many device access problems can be resolved through group membership changes. You can find the device name by watching sudo journalctl --follow as you connect your device. OR ls -1 /dev >dev.before, connect the device, wait 10 seconds, ls -1 /dev >dev.after;diff dev.{before,after}. Specifically, if ls -l shows that the group permissions (the second &...


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If you are using udisks2 you can consider using udiskie for this. udiskie-info -a This command will show all manageable attached devices. to mount or unmount these devices use these commands: udiskie-mount /dev/device udiskie-umount /dev/device Where devices are mounted can be specified in a config file for udiskie, default is /media or /run/media.


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Perhaps, it could be the kernel version each Ubuntu's, do they have both same kernel? You might check this link out about netdev


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This should be solvable by providing the owner of the share in the mount command. Try options : uid=user1,gid=user1,username=user1


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To auto mount a disk append a line in /etc/fstab : PARTUUID=[a-letter-digit-hypen-code] /mount/point hfsplus defaults 0 0 I am not sure about "hfsplus" but I take it from your question. An example to get the [a-letter-digit-hypen-code]: sudo blkid /dev/sdx1 #sudo is not required in all cases here /dev/sdx1 from the example is retrieved from: ...


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According to this page https://ubuntuhandbook.org/index.php/2021/04/workaround-nautilus-admin-not-working-ubuntu-21-04/, This usually happens when you use “Open as Administrator” or “Edit as Administrator” to open folder or edit file via root. Or when you trying to access another user folder in system, and even using nautilus admin://, gedit admin://, or ...


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The mount point isn't under ~/.cache/gvfs/ it's under /run/user/1000/gvfs Replace 1000 with your own uid number I'll mount one of my own shares: ~$ gio mount smb://vubmate2004.local/Private Password required for share private on vubmate2004.local User [tester]: tester Domain [WORKGROUP]: Password: I'll check to see if it's mounted: ~$ ls -al /run/user/...


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Following explains step by step how to configure a drive in the standard Ubuntu desktop so it automounts. Note that you must have administrator rights on the computer to be able to complete this. Automounting the drive Decide where you want that drive to be mounted. As an example, I will assume you want to mount the drive in a directory /media/datadrive. ...


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Well, posting this as an answer, since it turned out, some of those gvfs/gio commands apparently worked - I just wasn't apparently looking at the right mount folder; apparently in my Ubuntu 20.04 it isn't: $ ls ~/.gvfs ls: cannot access '~/.gvfs': No such file or directory ... but instead: $ ls ~/.cache/gvfs/ 'smb-share:server=192.0.2.1,share=myshare' ... ...


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The clause LABEL=system-boot tells mount to mount any filesystem with volume label system-boot on that mountpoint. If you don't want that then don't use that clause. Replace it by /dev/mmcblk0p1 which tells mount to mount exactly that device, disregarding the label.


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try the _netdev option from the man page for mount: The filesystem resides on a device that requires network access (used to prevent the system from attempting to mount these filesystems until the network has been enabled on the system).


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From the comments... This: sudo mount -t nfs -vvvv 192.168.1.197:/Volume1/Plex /mnt/synology/ Should have been this: sudo mount -t nfs -vvvv 192.168.1.197:/volume1/Plex /mnt/synology/


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The error message ls: cannot access ...: Transport endpoint is not connected indicates that the process required to access a FUSE-based file-system is no longer running, while at the same time the file system still appears as mounted (source). That explains your file system being mounted, but not available. As of 2021, ntfs in Linux still is implemented as a ...


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How do I open / mount my ISO file when normal methods throw this error? wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/loop0, missing codepage or helper program, or other error. I tried several methods but they all fail somehow. I'm actually answering this problem (Unable to mount an ISO file), which problem I also have, and have just solved, but the ...


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Make sure that you have a good backup of your important Ubuntu files, as this procedure can corrupt or lose data. Keep these things in mind: always start the entire procedure with issuing a swapoff on any mounted swap partitions, and end the entire procedure with issuing a swapon on that same swap partition a move is done by pointing the mouse pointer at ...


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The mount command mounts a partition on a certain directory. That directory must exist. So you need to create the desired mount point if it does yet not exist. If it does already exist, then you do not need to, nor can you, create the mount point.


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