New answers tagged

0

The above answer by FatalMerlin worked great. You can also do an ‘alt-f2’ followed by ‘r’ and enter to restart gnome without the reboot...


0

for gnome-shell, one just needs to edit this file: /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/pc. and then reboot.


0

Did you try to get a new keyboard or if it is a laptop try a USB or BlueTooth keyboard?


0

Besides setting the repeat delay and speed as you've already done for a workaround, try: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.peripherals.keyboard repeat false Source: Ubuntu 18.04 Repeat Keys wont stay off


0

It has to do with xorg. Quick fix available at https://techwiser.com/fix-keyboard-not-working-in-ubuntu-18-04/


-1

Try this instead. External Link : Solution 01 This seemed to help a lot of people out on the WWW


0

Try removing the board and then re-attach it. Depending on laptop. Or Plug in a USB keyboard and see if the problem persists. Normally, every keyboard should have a generic driver already for Ubuntu. Something is not connected right. Or you messed up on install and chose another keyboard.


0

Apparently there's a layout already for that, but it wasn't working immediately or I had to restart. Select the English International with Alt Gr dead keys (without the US in the name) then restart your system. If you don't restart, the keyboard layout won't work. Now I can type: ' -> single quote AltGr + ' + e -> é AltGr + e -> é AltGr + n -> ñ AltGr + ~ ...


0

I managed to figure it out in the end, just needed to step back and think about it. For anyone else with the same problem, my solution was to go into Settings > Keyboard and create two shortcuts, one for "setxkbmap -layout us -variant intl" and one for "sekxkbmap -layout gb", and I can now use these to change my keyboard back and forth. Still mildly irked ...


1

You can change keyboard backlight settings in kbd_backlight/stop_timeout file. To find location of keyboard backlight configuration file according to your keyboard, you can execute following command in terminal. sudo find /sys/devices/ -name "kbd_backlight" You can configure timeout in seconds. sudo nano <full path of kbd_backlight dir>/...


0

Thanks. Removing the global shortcut for tabbing through open windows of an application has fixed my tabbing through Firefox. Still doesn't work for gedit, but that's a fight for another day.


0

Here is a way to do this using only xkb, which I think is superior to using xmodmap. This answer includes more details on what I wanted to achieve than the original question did. Xmodmap and xkb don't always play well together, this approach allows a lot more flexibility: This is all coming from: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/X_keyboard_extension ...


1

Set up the US International keyboard with dead keys. Then 'a will give you á and "a will give you ä. I use that too.


1

I found a way how it works. I created a ~/home//startup.sh This I launch with Autostart from Lubuntu. #!/bin/bash sleep 5 xmodmap keymods & exit 0 I need to use a 5 seconds delay.


0

For anyone issue hardware key problem on laptop: I have hardware problem with my q, Q key on my laptop I have ubuntu-mate 19.10 gedit /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/us sudo gedit /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/pc there in pc file, there is only one LSGT key, I took from us file { [q, Q] } definition and replaced it in pc. After that sudo dpkg-reconfigure xkb-...


0

Run sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration and change that setting to No toggling. Run gsettings reset org.gnome.desktop.input-sources xkb-options


0

I had the same problem with AltGr not working and found that in Region & Language you have to Manage Installed Languages and select Keyboard Input Method System to XIM - 18.04 defaults to IBus


0

You need to have a pattern that actually matches the hwdb lookups that the udev rules actually in your system are doing, keeping in mind that the distro's udev rules may be different in newer versions. You need to know how to figure out what the pattern needs to look like from the information that the udevadm test is directing you to. The relevant /dev/...


2

I made an attempt at using Caps Lock for the purpose, and even if I made it work, Caps Lock also kept doing its original thing, i.e. toggling to/from capital letters, which reasonably is not a desirable behavior. So below I show how it can be done using "3rd level of Right Ctrl" instead. On my Ubuntu 19.10 I run this command: gsettings set org.gnome....


0

I realize it has been 7.5 years since this question was asked, but I found it today when I had the same issue. I came up with this very simple solution that worked for me on Ubuntu 16.04: Open system settings -> text entry You will see your input sources ("keyboards") listed in a window on the left side. If you want to add more keyboards, press the bottom-...


0

What also works is Alt + F7 to Grab the Window then move it with the Arrow-keys and release it with Enter.


1

For posterity, here is the shell script with the xmodmap commands needed to map keycodes to keys for this situation: #!/bin/bash # fix the common F keys xmodmap -e 'keycode 128 = F3' xmodmap -e 'keycode 212 = F4' xmodmap -e 'keycode 237 = F5' xmodmap -e 'keycode 238 = F6' xmodmap -e 'keycode 173 = F7' xmodmap -e 'keycode 172 = F8' xmodmap -e 'keycode 171 = ...


2

You can open the /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/cz file for editing and make the desired changes directly. When doing so, you'll need to decide how important the original symbols typed via AltGr+{1,3,7} (!, #, &) are to you, and handle those accordingly. Caveat pointed out by terdon: This will be overwritten by any updates though, so it would make sense to ...


2

Because I like commmand line (fast) solutions, I tried the above gsettings command, but had to modify it: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings switch-input-source "['<Alt>Shift_L']"


0

Save custom keyboard shortcuts You can save/backup/export custom shortcuts/keybidings using just dconf and sed Export dconf dump / | sed -n '/\[org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.media-keys/,/^$/p' > custom-shortcuts.ini # Export Import dconf load / < custom-shortcuts.ini # Import Based on Ciro's answer (also here) Only for the added custom ...


2

Are keyboard multimedia keys different? Yes, these keys are a little different. They might report a single key code or multiple key codes when pressed with other keys like Fn for example. Furthermore, it is oftentimes difficult to identify their key codes with utilities like xev. This depends on the keyboard's manufacture's configuration. Multimedia keys, ...


0

Before you spend too much time to debug your virtual machine the fastest way to get hold of your important files within the VM would be attaching the existing virtual disk to another VM. In case you don't have another virtual Ubuntu machine, just create another one making sure you also create a new virtual disk. If you select it to be dynamically growing ...


0

This should fix your issue, it did for me with Keychron K4. echo 0 | sudo tee /sys/module/hid_apple/parameters/fnmode


0

Inside emacs, Ctrl-H Ctrl-K keystroke will show you the key and what function is attached to the keystroke. Ctrl-Q, in emacs, "quotes" the next character (removes any special meaning). In bash Ctrl-V keystroke is useful, as: echo "^vkeystroke" | od -bc You could dump the character sequences with xev, part of the x11-utils package. Read man terminfo;man ...


0

Although I couldn't get any proper permanent solutions to this problem, I could find a workaround. What I did was, turn on On-Screen Keyboard, Press CapsLock on the On-Screen Keyboard, and turn it back off. And Voila, the keyboard started working Again!!! But as I said, it's not permanent, you have to do this Everytime.


0

You have to change /etc/default/keyboard to correct values with single long command below: cat <<EOF | sudo tee /etc/default/keyboard # KEYBOARD CONFIGURATION FILE # Consult the keyboard(5) manual page. XKBMODEL="pc105" XKBLAYOUT="us,ru" XKBVARIANT="," XKBOPTIONS="grp:alt_shift_toggle" BACKSPACE="guess" EOF and then run sudo dpkg-reconfigure ...


0

I think Intel virtual technology was a problem. When I resume from suspend from power button works good. Maybe it was connected with graphics card driver. I update to nvidia 440.


0

If you are interested about this question, here's how I finally do it. Instead of trying to include the conditional part in the .xbindkeysrc directly I made a separate script that will loop fast enough to run or kill xbindkey daemon #!/usr/bin/sh while true do if [[ "$(xdotool getwindowfocus getwindowname)" =~ "Chrome" ]] then xbindkeys 2&...


2

The "ssh" file seems to work for me. I just installed the RPi 4 with ubuntu-server 19.10.1. Here are the full instructions for anbody who finds it: After you have installed ubuntu-server to your SD-card, mount the first partition (usually /dev/mmcblk0p1) on the machine that you installed the SD-card with. Next, create a file called "ssh" on the filesystem ...


1

Since, there is no gnome-shell-extension as of now for the static shifting of keyboard layout using default shortcuts Super+Space and Shift+Super+Space.. and the comments about this link Static ordering of keyboard layout switching in Ubuntu 17.10 and later with GNOME 3 from OP the problem with the solution proposed in the link (Alt+Shift) is that it ...


0

First, check if Slow Keys is turned off in the Accessibility menu on the top right. If it's already turned off, try: sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-input-all If it's already installed, reinstall it: sudo apt-get --purge autoremove xserver-xorg-input-all sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-input-all


0

Try pressing Fn + Esc, will turn on function lock and default back to media keys as opposed to function keys behavior.


1

xev is also an option. Just run: xev Make sure that the small, white window that opens is selected and press any key to see it. To limit xev's rather verbose output, so that it only shows the keys that you press, you can pass its output to awk: xev | awk /keysym/'{sub(/\)\,/,"", $7); print $7}' In any case, note that xev registers two events for every ...


0

The comment from Alex pointed me in the right direction. My keyboard does not have a numlock key, and for some reason numlock breaks the keyboard layout. sudo apt-get install numlockx I then set the following command to run at startup. numlockx off


4

To test a possibly faulty keyboard it's best to go as low-level as possible. One of the easiest ways to do this without diving into kernel space is to work almost directly with /dev/input/event* device files. Namely, you can use evtest to see all the keyboard input. If you run it in grabbing mode, this will let you intercept everything—even Magic SysRq ...


8

Install keymon. It's in the Universe repository and run it using key-mon (not keymon!). man keymon has this: Keymon - Keyboard and mouse monitor window for GTK. Do read man keymon for all the options available. You should also right-click on it to check that the settings are appropriate for you. And if you don't like the default location, drag it to a ...


7

There is a website https://www.keyboardtester.com/ which lets you see which keys you have pressed, and it shows the keyboard layout. Also, there is a package called xkeycaps which can be used. Moving the mouse over a key describes the keysyms and modifiers that that key generates Edit: There are more sites available like http://en.key-test.ru/ http://...


0

Found the solution, looks like my Fn key was stuck, and everything else was just due to the Ubuntu shortcuts. This is a common occurrence with the Acer Aspire series, so I'm surprised I couldn't find anything online. Hopefully, I can find this post when this inevitably happens to me on my next Acer laptop.


Top 50 recent answers are included