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The application DISKS from GNOME utility for dealing with storage devices.


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I had dual boot on a 525GB Sata SSD and needed to clone to a 512GB NVME SSD drive. In my case, I managed to shrink one of the partitions and do the selective cloning by Macrium Reflect. Now, the 525GB Sata SSD is my second drive.


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A hard drive should not have bad sectors. If it has - it's failing and I would replace it. Back up your data as soon as possible, because trusting on your disk to survive one more day is dangerous. (Though I probably will, there is no accurate way to tell how long it will keep working.) If you want to have a second opinion on the state of your device, you ...


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Use a live system from a USB stick and install QDirStat on that live system (yes, that works!). Then use QDirStat to examine where all that disk space went. If you use Btrfs, snapshots may have accumulated to fill your disk.


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Yes. Encryption is done as an extra layer between the disk and the OS. One thing you do need to take into account: you really should use the same software version en encryption tools the encryption is done with. If your Ubuntu 20.04 crashes and you install Ubuntu 18.04 (so a lower version) the encryption software might have used new features not available in ...


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There is option to power off device in disks (gnome-disk-utilit) app: Go to activities (click super key on keyboard or top left corner on main desktop) Type disks and open the app Unmount all mounted partitions from external device and click power off button on right corner


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I did fix the the access to the all disks and the external hard drive , by using the program ( disks ) and mounted them manually.


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We bumped into the same situation with the exit code 141. We use the usb and select the second option to boot. After reboot, we can select the first option and can install the image without the exit code 141.


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After removing the -t flag it started working.


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I'll try to answer with no-live-boot-required method. Boot your PC and wait for grub-menu to appear When in grub menu select the "Default" option and press e key Edit the line that starts with linux and append init=/bin/bash at the end press CTRL+x after root prompt issue mount -o remount,rw / make new directory for your new home: mkdir /mnt/...


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As suggested by @waltinator, we can use smartctl as part of smartmontools: sudo smartctl -n standby /dev/sdb If the device is in standby, it should return exit code (2).


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/dev/sda4 is probably a Windows boot partition, /dev/sda6 is the system partition of Ubuntu, aka the root partition. To use the two old Windows partitions, you need to mount them properly. Usually, it's done automatically when the user clicks it in the file browser, and the mount point is of the following kind, /media/user-name/mount-point. As seen in the ...


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You could boot from a USB, and examine the hard drive to see what is taking so much space. the command sudo du -aBM -d 1 . | sort -nr | head -20 run at the root of the disk will scan all the files, and display the 20 largest directories. You can then cd into the one which looks unusually large... It does take a little wile for the program to run the first ...


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Are you sure you are selecting the correct device (hard drive) to install on? You can check Disks or GParted to get your device name.


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Do a default installation using the entire 128 GB SSD. You can then use that drive for your daily work, and use the large 1 TB HDD for storage (e.g. pictures, movies, archives, etc.) After installation of Ubuntu, you can setup the large 1 TB HDD using the included utility "Disks". The large 1 TB HDD should be formatted in the ext4 file format. By ...


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If you put discard in the fstab mount arguments for a filesystem on a bcache device, then the filesystem will issue TRIM commands to bcache for deleted blocks. In theory bcache could use incoming TRIM commands as hints for freeing cached data, but I don't think it does, and there are hints searching online that bcache doesn't understand incoming TRIM ...


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Your plan sounds good, except where I would copy the existing home to a /home folder on the SSD. You may limit this to just the user configuration data, and the user folders "Documents", "Music" etc. without any files in them if space is an issue. Removing the entry in /etc/fstab for your separate home would then automatically bring you ...


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You can change both replacement policy and cache mode via the /sys interfaces while the system is running. Just echo the appropriate setting word to the file and it changes the setting. The control file contents show the available options and current setting when you read them - for example: # cat /sys/fs/bcache/[you cache id]/cache0/cache_replacement_policy ...


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Extract to your external drive with --directory (or -C) option.


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The short answer: as suggested here on the Arch wiki, try updating the firmware of your SSD. Now the WHY, (only for those who would like to understand, how did I get to this conclusion, perhaps learning some useful tips in this type of troubleshooting - or better, to politely correct me as needed): I have the same problem, and I have Ubuntu 18.04 too. I have ...


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Full Install of Ubuntu to External Drive Back up Data on external drive. Determine Windows 10 boot mode. Type System Information in Windows Start panel. Under "BIOS Mode" it will say if Windows is Legacy or UEFI. If UEFI mode unplug your internal drive, or the drive will try to use Windows EFI partition. Boot a Ubuntu 20.04 Live USB in the same ...


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I managed to get the enclosure working this morning. I simply pulled one of the drives out and put it back in. The enclosure detected that a drive had been replaced and proceeded to rebuild. This took several hours, and appears to have fixed the problem. I don't recommend anyone else do this unless they are prepared to lose data. I didn't lose anything, ...


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If it was me, I would use your internal hard drive for the operating systems (Ubuntu 20.04 only needs about 25 gb or more) and use the external for files.


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ext4 reserves a portion of space, typically 5%, to avoid fragmentation and for system services. This is specific to ext4 See How To Free Reserved Space On EXT4 Partitions. But use it at your own risk. This should explain why the total partition size you see by both apps don't match. gparted reports the total partition size, while dh ignores the reserved ...


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