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Take a backup of anything important now. By the time you reboot next, all your data could be gone. And yes, once you've backed up your data, get a new drive. Your drive has failed/is about to. Don't use it again for something else. Ideally, replace it with an SSD from a reputable brand (e.g., Samsung). If you can't, replace it with an HDD from a reputable ...


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In linux, you do not install a program on another partition ("drive"). Upon program installation, different components of the program are placed in dedicated functional system folders. That boils down to folders containing data of different applications. One can, however, distribute different system folders over different storage media. This is ...


1

Check file system... boot to a Ubuntu Live DVD/USB in “Try Ubuntu” mode open a terminal window by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T type sudo fdisk -l identify the /dev/sdXX device name for your "Linux Filesystem" type sudo fsck -f /dev/sdXX, replacing sdXX with the number you found earlier repeat the fsck command if there were errors type reboot Bad block the ...


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You can try to use "TestDisk" to recover the filesystem. If that fails you can still try to recover some data using "photorec". It is considered good practice to work on a copy of the whole partition, because you can break things more while trying to repair. Might be impractical with a large partition though.


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Hard drives can fail. That is why you have copies of important files and memories on at least two drives, but preferably more. Then, when a drive fails, you do not loose your data. You used the drive for 10 years. That is a long time for a hard drive to remain operational. Windows 10 does not anymore recognize it. That, now, also Ubuntu does not recognize it ...


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You can tell the mount point in /etc/fstab. So you would set the name, and your partition would always mount with the same name. The header of the file is reasonably explanatory $ cat /etc/fstab # /etc/fstab: static file system information. # # Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a # device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust ...


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