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I had exactly the same problem. After trying several solutions, one did the trick (explaining with details in case someone else needs it): Edit /etc/default/grub by running in terminal while in the correct folder: sudo gedit grub Uncomment the line #GRUB_TERMINAL=console. The correct version shall be: GRUB_TERMINAL=console Save file Run in terminal: ...


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Well, for some reason I simply needed to roll back to an older nvidia driver. I guess 430 is simply not compatible. No clue why default drivers didn't work when I uninstalled, but I installed 418 and all was well.


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The solution was a combination of multiple things: the boot-repair did work in that it successfully reinstalled grub. however, it was also necessary to set the newly installed grub version as trusted in UEFI, as pointed out by oldfred above (thank you very much!); refer to Bootable device not found after clean install of Ubuntu 14.04 UEFI on Acer for more ...


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You can try if you can mount the NTFS partition manually with a mount command line. When that works, you can save the command line(s) to your ~/.bashrc file, that should make it mount automatically where you want it in the future. There are details about mounting NTFS at this link. The OP found it better to add the mount into the rc.local instead of the ....


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Assuming you accidentally didn't destroy the entire Windows bootloader, which given what you have shared I don't think you have, it seems like GRUB is not seeing the Windows bootloader. I suggest trying the boot-repair utility and if that isn't the magic program you need, look through the debug logs for important info you could share here. From a Live ...


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I would suggest trying to use the boot-repair utility from an Ubuntu distro (there is a chance it might not work, it will also warn you if the boot partition is too far away from the start of the drive, some older BIOS stuff won't look at the whole drive) sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-...


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This what I did to add the now latest (non free) memtest86+ to the grub boot menu for UEFI booting. Current memtest version is 8.2. Tools needed: Disk Image Mounter and grub-customizer, the latter is only for convenience :) Files: memtest binary (see below) Download the memtest binary from: https://www.memtest86.com/download.htm The 'Image for creating ...


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read: https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/grub-2.html Download and burn DVD: https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/grub-2.html These can help reset GRUB2 or solve GRUB2 problems. If you need 'bit by bit' replacement on to a hard rive (old type, SSD or NVMe) you may need similar to Macrium reflect program. I use software from Paragon-software GmbH , Germany ...


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Check: /etc/default/grub file exist or not. if not create one (refer below) # If you change this file, run 'update-grub' afterwards to update # /boot/grub/grub.cfg. # For full documentation of the options in this file, see: # info -f grub -n 'Simple configuration' GRUB_DEFAULT=0 GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=hidden GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -...


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Please check that what version of libssl installed on your system, In case of mine on Ubuntu 19.04 there was libssl1.1 instead of required libssl1.0. So I have to install software that comes with libssl1.0. Best part is ubuntu comes with snap to install such softwares like Termius. Then fix the problem as answered by "Rodrigo". Locate the installed path: ...


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I found a durable solution in the bug tracker (see https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1829620 WORKAROUND 3: upgrade BIOS) ASUS released a BIOS update for the UX433FN the 2019.06.17 (please check your exact model) WARNING: Updating BIOS is a risked operation and can not be reverted !! Overview: You basically have to download a zip, ...


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The EFI specification states that the EFI partition must be FAT. EXT3 will not work, your firmware cannot read that. So if you can, convert the partition to FAT. After that reinstall GRUB or run Boot-repair again.


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During grub-install needed files are copied from /usr/lib/grub/i386-pc/ to /boot/grub/i386-pc/ Maybe this works. Can you boot a live-linux? Mount your /-Partition from your system and try to copy the missing file and reboot. When you have access to your System reinstall grub and update grub-configuration.


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If you had left the SSD with Windows 10 in the system you would not have had any trouble at all. By removing that drive, you also removed the default EFI partition that was already on your system. EFI is designed to be capable of installing multiple OS'es on one system across different media. The EFI partition is needed for that purpose and will hold the ...


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If you cannot boot into a live USB, it is very likely that your problem is one or more of the following: Wrong/Corrupted .ISO Make certain that you have downloaded the correct .ISO for your hardware. For example, older computers with i386 architecture cannot run the .ISO file for x64 systems. Before writing the .ISO to DVD or USB, verify the checksum for ...


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Check on your BIOS/EFI settings. It must be set the priority of booting in Windows boot manager. You have to set that to Ubuntu or your hard disk (i.e. ATA...).


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I have the same issue. Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS was working fine, until I updated and rebooted and now I can't get beyond the 5 dot screen. Sometimes the screen goes to black, sometimes there's no more video signal. I updated BIOS (Asus A320M-K), put memory speed back to default, removed SATA disks, no effect. I can get into recovery mode, I ran dpkg to repair ...


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install grub-pc-bin grub-pcappears to be a meta package which will remove(!) grub-efi-amd64, which I guess would brick the pc, maybe not right away. installing apt install grub-pc-bin added the necessary decencies for me to install pc bootloaders from an efi system.


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I sort of fixed my issue yesterday. Here is the post. But it's not perfect. I still have two instances of ubuntu on the UEFI boot drive selector screen, and selecting them boots to Grub. But, I can select the hard drive Ubuntu is installed on and it boots directly to the OS. How do you boot automatically from Grub?


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I had the same problem and got here because of google. It seems both you and I were confused by the file /etc/grub.d/01_enable_vga.conf You want to have the file contain the cat command, you don't want to create it with cat (well, you can create it with nested cat). So try this: sudo bash -c "cat > /etc/grub.d/01_enable_vga.conf" << END cat <&...


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So, it seems like GRUB was properly installed on the MBR, but the BIOS was not booting in the right order. These were the steps to resolve: Change boot order in BIOS to boot from MBR (for me, this was choosing the option for the Hard Disk that didn't say UEFI). Boot into Ubuntu. Run sudo os-prober Run sudo update-grub Reboot


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Booting from my installer USB stick, I created a boot parition using gParted, following these instructions: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BootPartition I made sure that the boot partition was at the front of the disk. But Boot Repair detected an EFI and recommended I separate the boot/efi partition from the /boot. So, using gParted, I created an EFI ...


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I have exactly same problem with a Dell Precision Tower 5810. I allowed an ubuntu update to occur this morning (Jun 19, 2019). After reboot, I come to GRUB screen, hit return, face a blank purple screen, then nothing happens. Hard power down, and reboot. Go to Advanced Options for Ubuntu, recovery mode for kernel 4.15.0-52-generic, it couldn't even ...


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The issue was caused by a plugged-in USB headset. Because I was unable to perform any of your suggestions, I felt it had to be either a damaged disk, or something incredibly stupid. After a successful disk check, I unplugged all USB devices from the PC as a last measure before doing a reload, and it booted-up perfectly.


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I could solve the problem by Activating UEFI boot ( it was working with Legacy since UEFI is not recommended for my HP) Changing boot priority order in UEFI to OS Boot Manager at top I did not have enough time to try the other solutions, but I appreciate them as well.


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Windows 10 Anniversary Update, and the more recent Windows 10 Creators Update, have a really bad habit of wiping out Linux partitions on MBR disks. Microsoft has known about this bug for quite some time, but has chosen not to fix it. Sounds like you're a victim. Recovery is possible, but it can be tricky. Boot to the Ubuntu Live DVD/USB. Open Software &...


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HOW TO "UPDATE-GRUB" FROM WITHIN CHROOT Boot from your Ubuntu USB Thumb drive in Linux Live mode. Make sure your BIOS boots the USB drive in the correct mode (UEFI vs. Legacy/MBR) for your system, or else you'll have major problems getting update-grub to work. Once booted into live Linux, open a Terminal and start working through these commands: mkdir ...


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try upgrading to an SSD or SSHD. hard disks does'nt work well for laptops (SSHD's also, but it's better than hard disks) . if you are on a desktop, try a new hard disk or SSD.


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This could be a difficult question to answer. The simplest answer is to install fresh, but that sucks if you have a lot of data/customization already invested in your old install. If it were my machine, I would boot up Ubuntu in live mode from my Ubuntu USB install thumb drive and start poking around at the hard disk to try to figure out what has gone ...


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It depends on your partitioning scheme: If your Windows and Ubuntu partitions are separate: No issue, but make a full system backup using CloneZilla Live anyway. If you have something completely different from the standard or any of the partitioning options in the above question, definitely make a full system backup using CloneZilla Live!!!


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You can edit the fstab file in Live Ubuntu. Mount your root partition - sudo mount /dev/sda5 /mnt, then sudo gedit /mnt/etc/fstab. Fstab will load as a text file which you can then edit. First before you edit make a copy of the fstab file (fstab2). Remove all lines with /dev/sdb1 and My Passport. If sda3 is your Windows system, why have you allocated so ...


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First try this source: Insert your Windows installation DVD/USB and boot from it. Choose your language and click Next. When prompted to Install now just look left down to that window and click Repair your computer. Wait and a new window will pop up with the operating systems installed in your PC. Click on Windows 7/8/10 and click Next. In the next window ...


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As Neo said it is possible to upgrade your Ubuntu to 18.04 without affecting the Windows partition. You can use any of the method you stated yourself. Since both OS are in different partition they wont interfere with other partitions unless specified to do so. In my opinion it is better to turn off the Firewall temporarily than to make a custom rule to ...


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You can upgrade your Ubuntu using terminal and it will not affect your other partitions. You can do that with: sudo do-release-upgrade See how to do that in detail here. Even if you install the newer or other version using live disk it will not affect your Windows unless you erase the whole HDD or edit the partitioning of your HDD. See how to do that here....


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If one ever encounters this issue, it is actually not an error but simply a message. You can move down directories by using ls (hdX,gptY)/ which should show up your boot information. However, in my case moving to Boot did not show grub. Solution: I bypassed the command line by using CTRL+ALT+Delete and moving to Boot Load priority using F12(for my brand) ...


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I solved the problem by disabling Wayland by modifying /etc/gdm3/custom.conf: Create a backup of the file: sudo cp /etc/gdm3/custom.conf /etc/gdm3/custom.conf.old Open /etc/gdm3/custom.conf in a text editor: sudo nano /etc/gdm3/custom.conf Uncomment the line WaylandEnable=false by deleting the preceding # Save the file CTRL+O and exit CTRL+X. Reboot the ...


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You problem sounds like this one: GRUB 2 “stuck” on particular boot option The solution in answers: In this case the next_entry field didn't get cleared after a reboot like it should have (perhaps due to some btrfs incompatibility?) I was successfully able to unset it like this (again, within the chroot): grub2-editenv /boot/grub2/grubenv unset ...


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Thanks to all who responded. Great ideas and thanks for all the links. I think I'll make an image of the Windows install so I don't have to go through the hassle of downloading all the specific drivers. Then I'll partition as needed and apparently I need to make sure the Ubuntu partition is UEFI. Headed out on vaca for a few weeks so I'll give it a try when ...


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Was this your only Linux install and you are trying to change your system back to use solely Windows? If so, I always have to use diskpart in windows to remove the Ubuntu option after Ubuntu is removed, the method I use is detailed here: linuxbsdos.com run powershell as administrator start diskpart utility with diskpart list connected drives with list disk ...


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To boot from Ubuntu Live USB menu entry in /etc/grub.d/40_custom should look like that (Replace DRIVE_UUID with your partition's uuid): menuentry "Boot from LIVE USB Drive" { search --set=root --fs-uuid DRIVE_UUID linux ($root)/casper/vmlinuz boot=casper quiet splash -- initrd ($root)/casper/initrd.lz } To apply changes run: sudo update-grub


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EFI partitions are your friend, one per drive: FAT32 format About 200-400MB "boot" flag Windows usually handles this itself. With *ubuntu, create/verify it manually on your disk in GParted in the Ubuntu Live USB/CD before entering the Ubuntu installer. Not sure if that helps this specifically, but that's how I would have tried to avoid/solve this. It may ...


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I think you have a line like this: GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=hidden Change it to GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=menu And comment all lines regarding HIDDEN features.


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I had a corrupted boot configuration for Centos 7 and installed Ubuntu 18 in an effort to get grub up & running. Windows 10 was found but not Centos by either update-grub or the boot repair package/utility under Ubuntu. On the other hand, when I used the Centos 7 rescue utility to get their version of grub running & Centos back up (https://www....


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Adding following line GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD_LINUX=text to /etc/default/grub and update grub with sudo update-grub solved the problem. See: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1724639


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I'm pretty sure you have the typical NTFS lock issue. let's try to reinstall it. run "Cmd" or "Powershell" as an Administrator and type in it : powercfg -h off then try again. also for best results make sure you make your LiveUSB ad GPT/UEFI : to do this use rufus not yumi. you can then select GPT & UEFI in the drop down menus. also when you boot ...


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Boot-Repair should provide an easy, semi-automated solution here. Detach your old drive from the VM (to prevent adding further steps at the end). Boot a live CD and run the recommended repair in Boot-Repair. Power off the VM and detach the live CD. Your new drive should boot normally. Fix your /etc/fstab if necessary. It should point to your actual root ...


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Managed to get get back into desktop. Tried lots of ways people suggested by commenting out some GRUB stuff or command line to update. However, those doesn't work for me. Got a temporary fix for my case whereby, when starting up Ubuntu on VMware, when you see Oracle's logo, click on the screen for focus and hold onto SHIFT until Grub menu appears. On Grub ...


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You've have 100 MB of space for the partition boot-repair requested but it is still unallocated. This is how mine looks: The first step is to select the unallocated space and create partition with type of fat32. The second step is to select Partition from top menu and then Manage flags from drop down menu:


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You can run the Grub Customizer program you have installed with Grub itself. You can find it in your apps


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A good workaround for now is to install the rescue software Super Grub Disk 2 on a small USB stick that sits permanent in the USB slot of the computer. There is a software YUMI – Your Universal Multiboot Installer that can install the super_grub2_disk_hybrid_2.02s10.iso on a USB stick. Ubuntu boots from the rescue USB stick, decrypts the LVM volume and works ...


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