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2

Finally, I made the USB to boot in my PC. As shared by @C.S.Cameron , the issue that I was encountering is because of the corrupted ISO image. I downloaded a new image and used it to boot in my PC. NOTE: Verifying the ISO image with its corresponding MD5 or SHA256 checksum can save considerable amount of time.


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Turns out the documentation from Archlinux is incorrect. In step 8 you are instructed to add the following code to etc/default/grub: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="mem_sleep_default=deep" GRUB_EARLY_INITRD_LINUX_CUSTOM="/boot/acpi_override" What this line of code should really read is GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="mem_sleep_default=...


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I ran into a similar issue, and after a reboot the issue went away. One thing I would recommend is not to use the automatic login on Ubuntu 20.04 because that is what caused me to get into an infinite login loop since the machine thinks I am already logged in even though I am not.


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Purging the package is not enough: ucf (update configuration files) protects the files. One way to avoid this is to force ucf default action. I didn't had much luck with confmiss in dpkg options, so I've read the ucf documentation. override the default ucf action, to create configuration if it doesn't already exists: export UCF_FORCE_CONFFMISS=1 purge the ...


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I have seen this on an rpi3 with newer versions of Fedora, too. Prior versions used U-Boot only, with a script arrangement called 'distro boot'. Grub is what is used on x86 and (for better or worse) some distros like to use it on ARM also. U-Boot is a full bootloader but grub is only a 'second-stage' loader, i.e. it needs something to load it. In this case U-...


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You have to move problematic file out the way by sudo mv /boot/grub/grub.cfg.new ~ sudo update-grub and then resume package installation by sudo apt-get install -f sudo dpkg --configure -a sudo apt-get dist-upgrade


3

Rufus Settings for UEFI Only Ubuntu Install Note Partition scheme and Target system for UEFI only install.


1

I can see only one instance of grub installed on your system and this instance is installed to your EFI System Partition /dev/nvme1n1p2 (SSD1 - OLD). If you remove the drive which holds the EFI System Partition you will be unable to boot either OS on this machine. Installing an instance of Grub to the OS-partition does only make sense in legacy-mode, but not ...


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In my system (Ubuntu 21.04), the program Boot Repair worked fine. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair


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Because you haven't fixed grub yet. All you've done so far is allowed yourself to boot up from the grub terminal. You need to type the following from terminal once you have fully booted up: sudo update-grub sudo grub-install /dev/sda shutdown -r now


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You can put /boot into a separate boot partition in a drive that is recognized at boot. Then the system will see your nvme drive and you can have your root partition / (and /home partition if you have one) in the mvme drive. I have installed a system like that in one of my computers, and it works well for me.


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Searched around a bit more on reddit and found: https://www.reddit.com/r/Ubuntu/comments/pkt0qg/cant_upgrade_anymore/hc5xy9g?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3 tl;dr Ok, that explains why I couldn't find that file in the packages on https://packages.ubuntu.com/. The upstream developers of fwupd fixed this bug like this, i.e. they replaced ...


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This looks like the kernel falling back to the vendor logo. I was able to stop the logo from appearing between GRUB and Plymouth in Fedora by adding video=efifb:nobgrt to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX in /etc/default/grub. Considering that it is a Linux kernel console parameter, it should work for Ubuntu too. (Don't forget to run sudo update-grub after changing /etc/...


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Maybe to late. If I understand correctly, what you met is not a terminal. In this Ubuntu version, if you didn't switch, the tty2 should hold your running one, but tty7 is nothing. This is because the default display manager of 18.04 is SDDM, which just have 6 initial ttys(tty1~tty6). So, if you did something like Ctrl+Alt+F7, the traditional place of a GUI ...


3

Multi Boot USB with Windows Installer 1) Install mkusb and guidus: sudo add-apt-repository universe sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mkusb/ppa sudo apt update sudo apt install mkusb sudo apt install usb-pack-efi 2) Create a Windows Installer Start mkusb, enter password, select Install (make a boot device). Select extracting Windows Installer. Select New ...


1

It seems that this is not possible, if this answer is correct, saying: You most likely have Solus installed while the bios was set to UEFI mode. This will install Solus with the clr-boot-manager bootloader and not grub. Hence there are no grub entries created and hence Mint Grub will not have the entries available to boot. Reinstall Solus while the BIOS is ...


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I got into the same situation you did. There might be a simpler way, but this is what I did to fix it. You'll need an Ubuntu USB so that you can chroot into the encrypted partition. You need to install cryptsetup-initramfs and then run update-initramfs by doing the following. Chroot into the encrypted partition Boot into Ubuntu from a USB and click the "...


1

GRUB is needed to boot Ubuntu. Without it, you won't be able to boot Ubuntu. Don't remove it.


-1

go into the UEFI settings. this is done with the Esc or F10 keys on a HP laptop Move to system configuration and go down to change boot order then go to the option with the arrow next to it. when you open the menu it should show all the OS'es accessible in the boot menu. select one and save the changes. you should be booting to that drive whenever it is ...


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To successfully boot linux, you have to have the bootloader on a bootable disk. Typically, this is your first disk. If you have an EFI system with an EFI partition on the primary disk, linux can install its bootloader in the same EFI partition that windows uses. If you have a legacy system with a MBR format partition table on the primary disk, you have to ...


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I'm running into this issue because I want to boot a recent Ubuntu Live CD such that the kernel is not tainted. However the ZFS modules taint the kernel. TLDR; Booting with the kernel parameter systemd.mask=zfs.target allowed booting without loading the zfs modules automatically. In investigating this I found 3 places where the zfs module could get loaded. ...


0

First, boot into Ubuntu. You can easily install grub from a regular Ubuntu session (not a live session) using the following commands: sudo grub-install /dev/sda sudo update-grub This assumes you have only one hard drive or SSD and that this drive is the default /dev/sda. As far as I know, grub will not show up when you run sudo fdisk -l. However, you can ...


1

Solved: Grub with theme when you have an encrypted root filesystem: original post: https://bgstack15.wordpress.com/2021/01/17/grub-with-a-theme-when-you-have-an-encrypted-root-filesystem/ You have to move the theme to the boot partition where encryption is not enabled (and bc of that grub will be able to access the theme). Instructions: After installing ...


0

I am going to make some assumptions: That Windows is installed and configured to boot via UEFI. Ubuntu is installed and configured to boot via UEFI. You're currently seeing the grub menu at boot. After Windows has been upgrade to 2021 April? Grub Menu disappeared I use UBUNTU USB BOOTED AND Install Boot-repair and chosen auto-repair and successfully install ...


0

Answer from Thiago Lucio did the trick for me. I have to change "if [ \$grub_platform = efi ]; then set timeout=${GRUB_RECORDFAIL_TIMEOUT:-30}" to "if [ $grub_platform = efi ]; then set timeout=3" in /etc/grub.d/00_header I use a dual boot with EFI.


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first sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer second sudo apt-get update third sudo apt-get install grub-customizer Open Grub Customizer And you can edit your grub You can even change your grub wallpaper it's a great tool Risk Involved whether you use the tool or edit the grub.cfg file


1

I know this is a very old question and I don't have enough reputation to comment this, so for anyone still looking to do it without Grub-Customizer because of it's infamy: This method assumes you have a dual-boot with one Linux and a Windows installation. Since the order in /etc/grub.d specifies the order in which they are called, you could simply call os-...


0

I had the exact same symptoms. Turned out that the Ubuntu 20.04 installer had incorrectly mounted the Windows 10 EFI partition in /etc/fstab at /boot/efi for the Ubuntu installation. This meant that new kernels and other grub updates were being added to the wrong grub.cfg in the wrong partition. I just mounted the correct Ubuntu EFI partition in /etc/fstab ...


0

I am also suffering from this issue running Windows 10 dual-booting with Ubuntu 20.04.3 LTS. Following the advice in this thread and others I've got things to the same point as FirDouglas. That is, grub fails to load initially, it then 'falls back to default loader' and I can select Ubuntu. This would be bearable if Ubuntu loaded up correctly. For whatever ...


0

I believe this has something to do with Microsoft trying to enforce secure boot. If I load the EFI shell from bios, and navigate to EFI\ubuntu, I was able to copy grubx64.efi over shimx64.efi. I'm assuming shimx64.efi isn't getting the correct parameters hence the error so just trick things by putting grubx65.efi there instead.This assumes you are not ...


0

Problems with Windows are unrelated to Ubuntu. Grub, the bootloader, can only boot working Windows. What you should do now is try to boot Windows directly (UEFI settings > Boot) and if successful then let it install any pending updates and reboot how many times it needs. Then change the boot order back to Ubuntu, boot it and run sudo update-grub so it ...


0

Hope your sda7 is installation partition and sda1 is efi. boot a live cd/pendrive open terminal and enter these commands *line by line. sudo mount /dev/sda7 /mnt sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi sudo rm -r /mnt/boot/efi/* for i in /dev /dev/pts /proc /sys; do sudo mount -B $i /mnt$i; done sudo chroot /mnt grub-install /dev/sda update-grub exit reboot


0

My Alienware Area 51M met the same problem recently. After a long test. I confim this is caused by the linux kernerl 5.11 So, no matter what distribution of linux you install, as long as its linux kernel version is 5.11, you will meet the same problem. I have just tried Ubuntu 21.10 daily build, using the kernel 5.13. And it solves the problem of black ...


0

Solved: -Tried booting into the Windows partition directly from the UEFI Boot Menu. It didn't work. -Booted into a Windows 10 installation USB pendrive, then "Repair", then "Repair Windows initialization" or something like that. It automatically found the windows partition and repaired it. -With that, I was able to boot into Windows from ...


0

Installing Windows after Ubuntu is not the recommended process for a dual boot Windows and Ubuntu system, but it is possible. Here's the general outline: Make space for Windows Install Windows Mount the /boot directory or partition Install the bootloader (GRUB) Step Zero – Backup your important data before doing anything Step One – Make space for Windows ...


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