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0

Check your ~/.bashrc there might line(s) mentioning /root/dotnet file or directory cat ~/.bashrc If such entry exists then replace it with valid file or directory path instead of /root/dotnet or remove it if unnecessary


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Use Alt+Backspace instead: it works just like Ctrl+Backspace and doesn't require any configuration.


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This is an old question but clearly still relevant. Based on this useful post, here is how to backup/restore your GNOME Terminal settings; this can be used for instance when migrating from one computer to another. * Please be advised * : this will overwrite the default Terminal profile on the new machine! Make sure you're using the same profile name on ...


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I had the same issue, try turning off your wifi then do the normal power off. This is the only thing that works for me. I tried the sudo poweroff that worked sometimes but turning off the wifi has worked constantly. Seems to be an issue with wifi driver in 16.04 and 18.04.


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Ubuntu 18 Strangely enough, I had a read-only /tmp filesystem. I hardened my /tmp directory and bash-completion worked as it should. Make sure you do not have any processes using the /tmp folder or moving the /tmp folder might be denied to you. dd if=/dev/zero of=/var/TMP bs=2048 count=1048576 mke2fs -j /var/TMP mv /tmp /tmp_backup mkdir /tmp mount -o ...


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Yeah, this is a known bug. Please add your "This affects me to" to give it higher priority. https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/network-manager/+bug/1751673


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Open Preferences -> shortcuts in terminal: Then Single click on copy shortcuts Press Enter Press Ctrl+Shift+C on window simultaneously Close the preferences and your enter key will work.


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I gave up and reinstalled the Ubuntu from scratch, and the terminal (including tabs) behaves the way I'd expect. Technology, eh?


0

To open a new tab in your current terminal window select File -> New Tab or press Shift + Ctrl + T In order to be able to select File -> New Tab in your current terminal window make sure that the Show menubar by default in new terminals option is enabled in the terminal preferences in Edit (in menubar) or Terminal ▼ (in Panel) -> Preferences -> ...


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To add a new tab while in the terminal, click on File and select "New Tab".


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A very elegant form is using -a option, it will recurse as -r, but will keep all attributes of the files, particularly permissions, and symlinks underreferenced: sudo cp -a /path-to-backup/themes /usr/share/ In another words, "When performing the copy, attempt to preserve as much of the original file structure, attributes, and associated metadata as ...


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One simple way is to see how many processes are currently running according to the linux scheduler using: grep procs_running /proc/stat You may want to also take into consideration that some processes are temporarily blocked (say on I/O or waiting), so it may be also worth taking these into consideration: grep procs_blocked /proc/stat


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Simply just edit the preferences of the terminal. Go to Edit --> Preferences and then change the number of rows to 50 as in the pic below.


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You could simply change the default settings in you gnome-terminal profile, or You could create a new launcher item, based on the current gnome-terminal.desktop file. This file is located at /usr/local/share/applications/gnome-terminal.desktop. Copy it to ~/.local/share/applications/ and edit the Exec= and Name= lines accordingly and add it to your dock. I ...


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It's a known bug, tracked upstream at https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/gtk/issues/2174. As stated there, disabling header bar or disabling mnemonics are possible workarounds.


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There are in-process switches, accessible by typing h within. I can't find a way to list cumulative network meter from the command line. However, I found the following command gives all the other functionality... $ glances -0 -b --fs-free-space --process-short-name -0 lists CPU by overall work, not only for the core(s) the process uses -b shows Byte-form ...


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Actually it turns out to be just me booting of the recovery mode everytime (see why in my previous question) so i updated ubuntu to 19.10 and everything seems to be working


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The issue is likely the & character in your URL - which is causing the shell to place the command in the background (as indicated by the [4] 2652 job number / pid). Try quoting the URL string: ./sqlmap.py -u "https://nice.app.com/forgot_password?email=rob@bob.com&key=cc"


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"Y" is not a valid response to how do you want to proceed? [(C)ontinue/(s)tring/(r)egex/(q)uit] Choose either C to continue (Normally the uppercase is the default, so a return should also continue). Guessing for the lower case letters: s stands for a string, which is passed to bash to run as a program (so Y is not a valid program, so, not found). r ...


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You can install it using a single command, it actually works for me.. You can also try using software center by searching the item in your peppermint device. sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install gnome-terminal


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Just for the record, in case somebody stumbles here, searching for answers... Another thing to try is the Enter key on the keypad, if you have a full size keyboard. The (Logitech 270R) keyboard was working fine under Win, so nothing wrong with the key itself. (I didn't have an alternate Linux installation to try, at the time.) In my case, the normal Enter ...


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