New answers tagged

1

I guess since I installed ubuntu on a seperate hard disk, I could see ubuntu as an option by booting to the BIOS and in the "Boot" tab I selected "selecting "UFEI Hard Disk Drive BBS priorities" and here I changed Ubuntu to be the first option. and problem solved now I am presented with a list to choose from(windows or linux).


0

Try booting in the bios to the linux drive. A GRUB menu should open and your choices are availible there. If this works, set the default boot drive to the linux drive


4

The answer is quite simple: no. Only memory that is used by the operating system will eventually be swapped to disk.


3

There seems to be an unasked question here which is how to not only uninstall Ubuntu, but how to prepare your device to be resold to a third party. Formatting the hard drive is not enough to prevent someone from stealing your personal data.. That's because formatting does not actually delete any data. If you are selling the device on craigslist you should ...


0

In this case it actually seems easier to remove Linux than if they were on the same drive. GRUB is on the M.2 drive, so I changed the boot order from the BIOS/UEFI boot options menu to put the 2.5 inch drive first. Bam, no more GRUB. After that I formatted the drive with Linux on it from Windows using the Windows disk partitioning tool.


0

As others have said in comments, it’s a bit of a broad question relating to what might happen. My approach would be - I don’t agree with the ‘so there will be no problems’ in your comment. As soon as you are doing something as ‘invasive’ as installing a new release of your os over another in a dual boot system, almost anything bad could happen even though it ...


0

If Windows is installed in UEFI mode, boot and install Ubuntu the same way. Windows 10 should already be in UEFI mode, unless it's a very old install upgraded from Windows 7 era or you deliberately chose MBR instead of GPT when installing Windows. Make sure you have UEFI installation media. If you aren't sure how to do this, flash the ISO with balenaEtcher, ...


0

System "freezes" are often caused by running too many, too large programs and running out of available memory. Use free to see if you have swap space, read man mkswap swapon fstab to create some. Swap space must be contiguous. use mkswap or fallocate, not dd. Traditionally, swap space of 1.5 × RAM has been recommended, but YMMV. If you don't plan ...


0

After a "sudden shutdown", aka "system crash", and reboot, the terminal command sudo journalctl -b -1 -e will show you the end of the previous boot's log's. If there is no hint there, suspect power/ overheating. Read man journalctl to see how to extract information from the logs. You can find how I make use of journalctl easier at https:...


0

from a terminal window in your ubuntu do "sudo update-grub". It should be able to find your windows 7 installation. After that you should be able to see a grub menu on boot with both Ubuntu and Windows 7 options.


1

Boot Ubuntu on UEFI computer without USB or CD or GRUB Create FAT32 partition 3GB to 11GB, depending on the need for persistence. Copy/Paste contents of ISO file to new partition using 'Files' or 'Archive Manager'.* Reboot pressing F12 and select UEFI Ubuntu.You will be offered the choice to boot Ubuntu. You can add a "writable" file up to 4GB ...


0

The answer to your question is: yes. It is you, not the operating system, who is in charge of deciding where your files go. So in principle, no problem. The only caveat you may face is that all operating systems you use must support the file system on the external drive for this to work.


1

I can see only one instance of grub installed on your system and this instance is installed to your EFI System Partition /dev/nvme1n1p2 (SSD1 - OLD). If you remove the drive which holds the EFI System Partition you will be unable to boot either OS on this machine. Installing an instance of Grub to the OS-partition does only make sense in legacy-mode, but not ...


0

So, after trying the solution proposed by @vanadium to no avail, I reasoned that in the absence of shock to the drive or creaky noises, and given the fact that I had interrupted a windows update, this was probably a logical failure caused by an I/O error. I burned a live USB stick with SystemRescueCD, a special purpose linux distribution which comes with ...


0

In my system (Ubuntu 21.04), the program Boot Repair worked fine. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair


0

I had also had the same issue before on my acer aspire 5 when I was installing manjaro. The system would just hang if you try to enter the BIOS using the F2 button. But I was able to enter the BIOS by restarting directly into the EUFI from the GRUB menu. And I also noiced some weird/blank names in the boot order. Removing/reordering the EFI boot order using ...


0

Because you haven't fixed grub yet. All you've done so far is allowed yourself to boot up from the grub terminal. You need to type the following from terminal once you have fully booted up: sudo update-grub sudo grub-install /dev/sda shutdown -r now


0

You have a few options. You can physically disconnect the disk with Windows before installing Ubuntu so that you can use this "Erase disk and install Ubuntu" option, then reconnect the disk after installation. You will need to update GRUB so that Windows is an option in the GRUB bootloader. But the better option would be to format the disk with ...


0

I used the exact same guides as the OP. Apparently, you have to re-run the refind-install script. I did it from the recovery mode of Mac OSX (so I restarted pressing Cmd+R, opened a Utils -> Terminal and ran the script from its location - you will have to navigate to it using cd, or use e.g. the find command-. Once you are in the right folder, run it ...


4

Ubuntu is not an application that runs under Windows. Ubuntu is a completely separate Operating System, independent of and equal to Windows. But it's not a Windows clone -- Ubuntu is quite different in many ways. Windows cannot be running when you install Ubuntu, therefore you use the bootable installer on the flash drive. Step 1: You download the Ubuntu ...


0

There is a great Live ISO called Boot-Repair-Disk. It has Gparted and other useful tools precompiled, so you can manage your disks and partitions. The Boot-Repar tool will help you to rebuild the boot record and the /boot. It supports EFI too. A. (in case of Physical PC) Make a Boot-Repair Live USB media with dd in Linux or Rufus in Windows; B. (in case of ...


2

As you indicate in your question, your one partition that was automatically created during installation is in use. You cannot change a partition that is in use. To change the partitioning on this drive, you will need to work from a live session, i.e., a session started from an installation DVD or USB. More advanced users can do this at the terminal from a ...


17

It depends. If you share partitions under Windows and linux, then the option Windows Fast Startup in Windows should be turned off. If you do not use any partition that Windows uses under Linux, you can leave Windows Fast Startup in Windows on. With Windows Fast Startup turned on, as one of its tricks, Windows does not close the partitions it uses. To Linux,...


0

For information only... I finally ended up by re-installing Ubuntu on the local drive, while the external drive was unpluged. Now it is working. I wish I could boot-repaired it. I started re-installing every software from scratch. At least now, it is working like a charm!


3

Multi Boot USB with Windows Installer 1) Install mkusb and guidus: sudo add-apt-repository universe sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mkusb/ppa sudo apt update sudo apt install mkusb sudo apt install usb-pack-efi 2) Create a Windows Installer Start mkusb, enter password, select Install (make a boot device). Select extracting Windows Installer. Select New ...


1

It seems that this is not possible, if this answer is correct, saying: You most likely have Solus installed while the bios was set to UEFI mode. This will install Solus with the clr-boot-manager bootloader and not grub. Hence there are no grub entries created and hence Mint Grub will not have the entries available to boot. Reinstall Solus while the BIOS is ...


0

It will depend on what the damage is with the file system and eventually the partition. Even if the system will not boot, the file system may still be readable. I would start a live session from an installation DVD or USB, and then try to mount the volume where the files are in read only mode. If that succeeds, you will be able to copy the files off to ...


2

Linux supports the ntfs file system of MS Windows. You therefore can access, and even work, with data on a Windows partition. There is, of course, an additional risk if you have Linux read and write on a Windows system partition. Allegedly, drivers for ntfs in Linux are around for many years, and of solid quality. The risk therefore can be considered small. ...


1

GRUB is needed to boot Ubuntu. Without it, you won't be able to boot Ubuntu. Don't remove it.


-1

go into the UEFI settings. this is done with the Esc or F10 keys on a HP laptop Move to system configuration and go down to change boot order then go to the option with the arrow next to it. when you open the menu it should show all the OS'es accessible in the boot menu. select one and save the changes. you should be booting to that drive whenever it is ...


0

In a similar case (with a HP250G7 laptop) changing the boot order fails, but inactivating all Windows entries (0000, 0002) helps: $efibootmgr -b 0 -A $ efibootmgr -b 2 -A $ efibootmgr BootCurrent: 0003 Timeout: 0 seconds BootOrder: 0000,0003,2001,2002,2004 Boot0000 Windows Boot Manager Boot0002 Windows Boot Manager Boot0003* debian Boot2001* EFI USB ...


0

If you use two SSDs instead of one SSD there may be a reduction in the available disk space due to the requirement for leaving empty disk space on the SSD. You need some available space for a variety of reasons. If your drive fills up, you won’t be able to save new files to the drive or download anything, including updates. If you have an SSD, leaving at ...


1

First, you will need to Create a partition in the free space Format that partition so it contains a file system Al of this can be done with the utility "Gnome Disks", installed by default in default Ubuntu with the Gnome desktop, or with Gparted, available by default in a live Ubuntu session started from an installation USB/DVD. Because you are ...


1

If you are using LVM, you could extend the logical volume that Ubuntu is installed on. This can be achieved with the following: create a new partition in the free space: use gparted or fdisk Create a new LVM physical volume(PV): pvcreate /dev/sdb6 Add the PV to the LVM Volume Group(VG): vgextend vg-ubuntu /dev/sdb6 Extend the LVM Logical Volume(LV): ...


0

SUBJECT TO DATA LOSS First of all check on what drive is windows on it may be sda1 or sda2 or any sdax then Get a pendrive Download the Gparted iso from https://gparted.org/download.php And then download Unetbootin and make the pendrive bootable with the gparted iso you downloaded insert the pendrive and then reboot, before it shows the grub, press F12 or ...


1

It has to do with the timezone of your system. GParted live, for instance, boots with UTC timezone. If you are in GMT+something timezone, then the last time the partition was mounted is in the future. Therefore, running e2fsck does not update the date that resize2fs is checking to insure that the partition was checked. Setting a date in the future, or ...


0

That looks strange, your "main" disk is not even mounted. What you see is only your USB stick. You need to install Ubuntu "besides" Windows. Since Windows is probably installed in UEFI, Ubuntu needs to be installed as UEFI as well. When installing you need to make sure that the windows partition is large enough for another OS. Many years ...


2

Make sure that you have a good backup of your important Ubuntu files, as this procedure can corrupt or lose data. Keep these things in mind: always start the entire procedure with issuing a swapoff on any mounted swap partitions, and end the entire procedure with issuing a swapon on that same swap partition a move is done by pointing the mouse pointer at ...


2

It is not trivial to make sda6 use the free space, because it comes before that partition rather than after it. A move of sda6 is therefore required. This can be a lengthy process that may fail. Take following steps from a live session so none of the partitions on the drive are in use. Do not start this before your backup of your user data is up to date. ...


-1

You can't resize the partition because the unallocated space is not adjacent to the sda6 partition. if you are not using the sda7 partition, then you can delete it and then try to resize the sda6. Make sure you are not using the sda7 before doing the above and make sure you have backed up your data.


-3

Solution that worked for me finally. (with out using any command line or other programs) I used https://launchpad.net/grub-customizer sudo apt install grub-customizer Once installed, launch the software from your application launcher to load up in UBUNTU 20.04 and just click SAVE after it finished loaded. (I did not change any things) reboot select ...


1

Setup should be like any other OS combination. Install the OS on one disk, then go through the installation again but select the other disk. Obviously the same OS would be listed twice in the grub menu, see How to safely change OS name in grub boot menu? for how to specify the name for each one. It has several viable solutions, I think this one is best for ...


0

Yes, you can. Still, it is recommended to have your operating systems all on the fastest drive, i.e., the SSD drive. This is what really makes for a general perceived strong increase in speed of your computer. In contrast, loading e.g. a Writer document from a slower drive will not "feel" much slower, except for very large files. Even with an SSD ...


0

Answer from Thiago Lucio did the trick for me. I have to change "if [ \$grub_platform = efi ]; then set timeout=${GRUB_RECORDFAIL_TIMEOUT:-30}" to "if [ $grub_platform = efi ]; then set timeout=3" in /etc/grub.d/00_header I use a dual boot with EFI.


0

tl;dr ntfsresize & gparted (which uses ntfsresize) should work perfectly fine for resizing ntfs filesystems but if you have access to Windows, that should work well too. To address the answer stating that Windows is often unable to defrag + resize partitions - This is true, but usually only applies if you're trying to resize the system (C:) drive while ...


0

I had the exact same symptoms. Turned out that the Ubuntu 20.04 installer had incorrectly mounted the Windows 10 EFI partition in /etc/fstab at /boot/efi for the Ubuntu installation. This meant that new kernels and other grub updates were being added to the wrong grub.cfg in the wrong partition. I just mounted the correct Ubuntu EFI partition in /etc/fstab ...


2

You're right. You can't unmount and resize a partition that is currently in use. You can easily use Gparted Live. It's a small bootable Linux that you can boot from USB or CD. Then you can easily do whatever you want with your disk and be sure that disk is not in use.


1

The issue is missing firmware. The system actually boots fine, it's just that there is no video (see last paragraph). I was able to fix the issue by updating the kernel to the latest stable mainline release, and by installing the missing AMD GPU firmware files. What you need to do is this: git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/firmware/...


0

Use Testdisk utility: sudo apt -y install testdisk -- to install testdisk sudo lsblk --for the partition name testdisk -- in the terminal, to start the utility & go from there When the entire process finishes and you are okay with the findings, press C to restore the recovered files at any directory of your choice. Hope this helps.


0

EDIT: Thanks for the the mistake pointed by C.S. Cameron. I am trying to correct my answer accordingly. I had not installed windows for a long time through live usb. But there should be an option of partitioning the SSD through the partition manager present in the installer. That way, main OS partition can be resized. If that option is not present in Windows ...


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