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Thanks to @rtaft and @mook765 for helping. I'm not very experiencing in grub internals, and actually I don't have much desire to read tons of documentation. In my case I have to HDD: /dev/sda - Debian /dev/sdb - Ubuntu. Both of these have their own copy of /boot/grub/grub.cfg. Let's say I login to Debian now, it means all commands like sudo grub-update ...


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After disabling Optane from Intel's RAID software, as we as from BIOS, all the partitions are visible when you live boot, so its safe install. Please Note: Windows might crash when you disable optane, so keep a windows bootable ready too, if you need to reinstall it.


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I think there is the answer to your problem in this post: dpkg: new pre-installation script returned error exit status 1 The package's .preinst script is failing for some reason. To find out why, examine the script in /var/lib/dpkg/info/PACKAGENAME.preinst If you want to see exactly which line the script is failing on, edit the .preinst script and add set -x ...


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Rather the restarting Ubuntu, you can try just restarting the Wifi. Right click on the WiFi icon at the top right-> turn off, then turn it back on again. Does that help ?


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In case anyone has the same problem, I'm leaving this answer for reference. So I was trying to create a second UEFI partition on hdd. First one being used by windows. You just need to point Ubuntu installer to existing UEFI partition using the flag boot.


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You can use the famous rsync. Read rsync - Community Help Wiki. Example: rsync --stats --delete -avzh /source/dir /dest/dir Be aware of the --delete option matching mirroring needs (not archiving). For syncing to/from a cloud storage, see https://rclone.org/


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The Windows partition should be called (Windows SyS Drive) in Gnome Disks in Ubuntu!


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No need! Just select automatic during installation! This will automatically make Home and Root partitions! There is also no need for a swap partition as there is already a swapfile!


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What is your installation method? If it was through an usb stick, what is your boot table system( depends on your bios version). If it is an UEFI it's important to do the fallowing: When u press F11 to boot from the flash drive (usb) make sure u select UEFL:USB. Then proceed normally with your installation. I highly recommend that u search more about the ...


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I had a similar problem with Ubuntu 20.04 starting slowly. In the /etc/fstab file there were invalid entries about the partition, especially SWAP. This was due to, for example, having changed the partition setting after installing a new system. They need to be corrected so that there is something similar: # / etc / fstab: static file system information. # # ...


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You said you couldn't get the cd to boot but the optical drive is broken so I assume you're using USB. Where did you download the file ubuntu.com? Some other sources will not properly download or the download just got corrupted. Try redownloading from ubuntu.com and see if that works.


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Well, I'm happy to report that my issue seems more or less resolved (I say more or less, because I have experienced one more hang). It took patience and persistence, and maybe a little luck, but here's what I did... I made installing the NVIDIA drivers my number one priority. It took several tries (hard reboots), but every time I logged into Ubuntu, I tried ...


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I have successfully created a bootable USB for a Mac Mini 2,1 (2007) just last week. I've been searching and trying for a while. What I've discovered is that most Linux distributions don't have an EFI implementation on their ISOs that satisfies those old Macs. I'll write a tutorial sometime in the next few weeks (I still want to find another working ISO, ...


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Okay I was able to do this in the following steps:- (I did create recovery drive just in case I needed it) 1. Using Bios I changed boot priority from "ubuntu->windows boot loader" to "windows boot loader->ubuntu" (Most Important) 2. I deleted the Ubuntu volume and swap partitions using disk management(in Windows). 3. I deleted the ...


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When you see this error next time unplug USB and plug it into another USB port. The setup will continue from where it was stopped.


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seems to be a widespread problem. you might look into this post: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1835660 Somebody there suggests to change lz4 to gzip (comment #73) in the file mentioned by you /etc/initramfs-tools/initramfs Pls update because I have the same problem


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Start by backing up any important data. Make sure you boot into the 18.04 install and run GParted. Identify the partition with the 20.04 install. If you are running the 18.04 install its partition(s) will be locked. Select the 20.04 install and delete. Don’t be tempted to delete any other partitions that you are unsure of. If you go ahead with the upgrade to ...


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That is going to take a LONG time and it is going to warn you that it is risky because it has to move 3 partitions to the right (the swap and two microsoft partitions)... If the unallocated space was on the right directly next to the partition you wanted to grow, then it ('shifting it to the left') would go fairly fast and with less risk.... BUT it is an ...


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Same laptop model and everything here. You'll have to go into your BIOS settings and switch over to AHCI mode, but the laptop doesn't come with the AHCI drivers pre-installed. So first off you're going to have to go online and get it's drivers. Once you install that (presumably on windows), you can go back into your BIOS settings, turn off RST (disabling ...


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You cannot proceed without making significant changes to your system. One way is to backup everything, wipe the disk, set up GPT partitioning and restore. You will then have no practical limit on the number of partitions. Another is to backup everything and choose one partition to delete. You can then create an extended partition and a few logical partitions ...


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None at all. The installation is automated, so the bootloader settings and such will be configured by themselves. The only thing that will be different in the boot process is an OS picker, where you can choose to boot into Lubuntu or Windows.


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I have a dual boot of ubuntu with windows, what I do to eliminate the operating system is to eliminate the partition where I have it mounted. you could try to delete the partition of the disk where ubuntu 16.04 is, here comes information on how to do it,but be very careful not to uninstall 20.04 delete the partition of the disk where ubuntu


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After much research and help from the folks on the Freenode #Ubuntu IRC channel I have an answer. I ended up re-installing due to all the research and failed attempts. I've shared my process below. For those who will use this to migrate to RAID use rsync -avP --numeric-ids --delete-during /path/from/ /path/to/ for cloning your installed operating system ...


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It's a problem of the version as well as Secure Boot. I followed the steps: Disable Secure Boot from BIOS settings. Install VirtualBox 6 (if the problem is with 6.1).


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Extend computer Partition You should boot from a Live USB, not the OS whose partition is being worked on. Open GParted, select the HDD from the dropdown upper right. Right click the 150GB partition and select Delete. Click the green Apply check mark. Right click the 40GB partition and select Resize/Move. Stretch the partition to fill the empty space, ...


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Every partition question is individual, and what's more: different options are possible, and the choice between these is to an important extent a matter of preference on how you want to organize. A partition of 30GB for a linux system is plenty. You do run out of space because you also keep user data there. If you would move out all your user data, you would ...


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Plug-in your usb then go into the UEFI and set boot priority to try usb first. Check your boot priority in UEFI.


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I finally managed to fix it. It was a long ride. I think (while I'm not sure) that it was due to several issues : Grub that installed both as UEFI and Legacy boot Corrupted Grub that would not entirely uninstall, and would generate bad configuration files at each update Corrupted EFI partition resulting from attemps to fix it Corrupted kernel headers in my /...


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As @Ginnungagap adviced, I kicked off ubuntu with safe graphic mode and it worked for me.


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This thread didn't solve my problem. I had to add pci=nomsi just before resume=. take a look at this: Ubuntu 16.04 doesn't hibernate


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Obviously, Ubuntu 20.04 lacks the capability of detecting old disk configuration like the Ubuntu 16.04 does. I saw at least one post who had the same problem on this Ubuntu 20.04 live ISO installation. I am not asking for troubleshooting. I am asking to create another version of Ubuntu server 20.XX to have the ability to detect multi-boot partitions and ...


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After an hour or so of trying, I've found out that on the emergency mode screen you can input your root password and then type "mount -a" and that fixes the problem. Sorry to bother you, I'm just too inexperienced and Ubuntu has a really steep learning curve. I'd like to leave this thread undeleted as it may help someone else. Thank you again for ...


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Lets see details, use ppa version with your live installer (2nd option) or any working install, not older Boot-Repair ISO: Please copy & paste the pastebin link to the Boot-info summary report ( do not post report), do not run the auto fix till reviewed. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair Your "Windows" boot entry was modified to ...


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So Yeah I had resolved this few days ago just wanted to post and update how I resolved it. Narrow down the problem. Step1: I removed the old HDD from the laptop now only SSD was available. Step2: I made the /dev/sda2 as NTFS and marked a boot flag on it. After that, I tried multiple times recommended boot repair by ubuntu but that didn't help and it ...


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In the future, it is advised to stick to a single question and your question may get closed for asking multiple questions but I will go ahead and answer. Personally, I would recommend using at least half your drive for Ubuntu but that depends on how much you plan on using Windows in the future and how much you plan on using Ubuntu. If you plan on primarily ...


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This is because your disk format is MBR (Master Boot Record) an dit supports only 4 primary partiitons. You can check it from Windows Disk management tool by Right Click Disk 0 on the left -> select Properties -> In that Volume Tab. You can see either Master Boor Record or Guided Partiiton Table (GPT). If it is GPT, which is a new disk partition ...


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This seems to be an issue with initramfs. Changing the compressing from lz4 to gzip did the trick and I haven't booted to a black screen since I posted this question.


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You have a bit of a mess on your hands. Let me explain. You have a smallish 500G HDD, formatted with a MBR style partition table. This kind of format can only have 4 partitions max. So they trick the system and usually have 3 primary partitions, and 1 extended partition that can hold a bunch of logical partitions. When installing Ubuntu on a smallish disk, ...


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Here is what I did to solve the problem. The first solution might be required, but it might be worth testing if you have the same problem. I reinstalled Ubuntu following this answer to create a second EFI part for my Linux to boot independently from Windows: https://askubuntu.com/a/843649 I also disabled fastboot and secure boot previously as said in this ...


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I just formatted my original ubuntu partition and them booted from the external hard disk restored partition. It booted !!!


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BIOS HP Pavilion Laptop 14-ce1xxx You have BIOS version F.06. There's a newer BIOS available, F.17 and can be downloaded here. Source: https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c06263300 Note: Some HP computers will allow BIOS updates directly from the current BIOS. Note: May require Windows or FreeDOS to install the newer BIOS. Note: Verify all of the BIOS ...


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Here it says you can access it with: systemctl reboot --firmware-setup Linux on UEFI - how to reboot to the UEFI setup screen like Windows 8 can? | Super User systemctl | freedesktop.org


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I can't guarantee that it works for every error of this kind but you ought to be able to use your Ubuntu USB if it is a Live Ubuntu USB. In that case: Boot from your Live USB stick and select “Try Ubuntu”. Open a terminal and enter the following commands: sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt install -y boot-...


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It seems the install actually did work, and the conversion from MBR to GPT as well. I found this guide Use Grub Customizer to Change Boot Order & Make Windows Default for GRUB customizer and that showed the Windows Boot Loader. I moved Windows Boot Loader up to just below Ubuntu. After rebooting the GRUB menu showed and I was able to boot into Windows. ...


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It looks like the same issue that I had faced when I installed Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, a month ago. What I did is, I entered into live version by clicking 'Try Ubuntu' option. Once you enter to live version, you will see a installation widget on the desktop. Click that and it will start the installation and then it will ask for connecting the WiFi. If the WiFi ...


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It may be a driver problem. Try connecting to an ethernet port and troubleshooting with that connection. You can also try not to install but to run Ubuntu without installing. Does it work? Do you have WiFi conectivity in that mode? Is the hardware listed in the ubuntu compatibility list? Not saying that it won't work if not, but if the hardware is listed, it ...


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I had the same problem is an old notebook when trying to install ubuntu. the solution was to take it apart and clean the sata port. then everything worked correctly.


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Boot with Try Ubuntu Without Installing Get the desktop loads up Connect to wifi from wifi menu on top panel If it works, good. Else go to the Additional Driver and check for available drivers and select accordingly, then apply and reconnect wifi Install Ubuntu from the Install Ubuntu icon Hope it helps


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Most probably, you shrink a primary drive. If you shrink a primary drive in Windows, you can't use it because it is unusable. So you can solve this problem by shrinking a logical drive in the disk management of Windows and you will see it usable in Ubuntu installation.


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With BIOS and multiple drives, you do not run the auto fix in Boot-Repair as you do not want one grub in every MBR. You really want Windows BIOS boot loaders in MBR of sda & sdb as those are Windows only drives and grub only in sdc. Grub also only boots working Windows 10, so after Windows updates which turn fast start up back on, you normally have to ...


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