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Currently, at least on OpenSuse Tumbleweed, you're required to enter the LUKS password twice: once to decrypt /boot and once to decrypt your other partitions (assuming you use the same password for all partitions). In the early unlock, Grub2 also defaults to a US English keyboard layout, so you can't type in Dvorak or German or whatever your normal layout ...


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with Nvidia cards you need to add nomodeset to the grub boot parameter. here is how to do that.


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You need to change where the boot loader is in your BIOS settings. This will be different based on the machine, but generally there will be a "Boot Options" tab or menu in the BIOS settings, and in there you can specify the boot device or boot device order - specify the boot partition (or UEFI image) of your Ubuntu installation or whatever drive/partition ...


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I had exactly the same problem. After trying several solutions, one did the trick (explaining with details in case someone else needs it): Edit /etc/default/grub by running in terminal while in the correct folder: sudo gedit grub Uncomment the line #GRUB_TERMINAL=console. The correct version shall be: GRUB_TERMINAL=console Save file Run in terminal: ...


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On the other hand, the windows boot normally and I can even access data on my linux partition /dev/sda6 using a third party program DiskInternals. This is the root of your Problem. Since ubuntu bionic e2fsprogs creates filesystem with new feature. Filesystem features: has_journal ext_attr resize_inode dir_index filetype extent 64bit flex_bg ...


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The solution was a combination of multiple things: the boot-repair did work in that it successfully reinstalled grub. however, it was also necessary to set the newly installed grub version as trusted in UEFI, as pointed out by oldfred above (thank you very much!); refer to Bootable device not found after clean install of Ubuntu 14.04 UEFI on Acer for more ...


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Lets first check your file system for errors. For 18.04 or newer... boot to a Ubuntu Live DVD/USB open a terminal window type sudo fsck -f /dev/sda6 repeat the fsck command if there were errors type reboot Update #1: Well, this was one very strange HDD problem. Bottom line... From Windows, we deleted the Ubuntu sda6 partition, removed the Ubuntu boot ...


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Can I migrate from one Linux distribution to another Linux distribution? Data, yes; applications, no. Applications will require reinstallation in Manjaro because it is an Arch-based distro, not a Debian-based distro. If so, how can I do that alongside Windows without losing any data? Ask this question in http://unix.stackexchange.com which is for *buntu and ...


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Assuming you accidentally didn't destroy the entire Windows bootloader, which given what you have shared I don't think you have, it seems like GRUB is not seeing the Windows bootloader. I suggest trying the boot-repair utility and if that isn't the magic program you need, look through the debug logs for important info you could share here. From a Live ...


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I suggest using boot-repair to try and find the other OS. From Ubuntu or a LiveUSB, do this. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair Go through the steps it shows and it should bring you to a fully functional dualboot system


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I would suggest trying to use the boot-repair utility from an Ubuntu distro (there is a chance it might not work, it will also warn you if the boot partition is too far away from the start of the drive, some older BIOS stuff won't look at the whole drive) sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-...


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read: https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/grub-2.html Download and burn DVD: https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/grub-2.html These can help reset GRUB2 or solve GRUB2 problems. If you need 'bit by bit' replacement on to a hard rive (old type, SSD or NVMe) you may need similar to Macrium reflect program. I use software from Paragon-software GmbH , Germany ...


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So there are two versions of the WSL (Windows Subsytem for Linux): The first version, released a while ago, is basically like the inverse of WINE, i.e. it translates Linux system calls into Windows system calls. The second version, just announced recently, does away with the translation layer and instead ships an actual Linux kernel that runs alongside the ...


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The EFI specification states that the EFI partition must be FAT. EXT3 will not work, your firmware cannot read that. So if you can, convert the partition to FAT. After that reinstall GRUB or run Boot-repair again.


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If you had left the SSD with Windows 10 in the system you would not have had any trouble at all. By removing that drive, you also removed the default EFI partition that was already on your system. EFI is designed to be capable of installing multiple OS'es on one system across different media. The EFI partition is needed for that purpose and will hold the ...


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when you are at the install stage you'll see a screen that looks like this : Then one that looks like this : in this case you'll choose "alongside" you can also achieve the same thing with "Something else" but that is a manual format screen and I gather that you may not be enough of a techie, let's avoid that if we can. the rest should flow easily. I ...


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Welcome to AskUbuntu! You are confusing two separate things: dual booting, which occurs after you installed Ubuntu, and booting from a USB, which is handled by the BIOS. When you install Ubuntu, it handles how your computer will boot, scan for other operating systems installed (in your case Windows), and add them to the boot menu, a program called GRUB. ...


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Check on your BIOS/EFI settings. It must be set the priority of booting in Windows boot manager. You have to set that to Ubuntu or your hard disk (i.e. ATA...).


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install grub-pc-bin grub-pcappears to be a meta package which will remove(!) grub-efi-amd64, which I guess would brick the pc, maybe not right away. installing apt install grub-pc-bin added the necessary decencies for me to install pc bootloaders from an efi system.


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After a little digging, I finally found the answer. Looks like the ordering of the options matter. I moved user before exec and I am now able to run scripts in the mounted partition. This question is the one which helped. Maybe this needs to be mentioned in the Ubuntu Community Fstab page??


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I had the same problem and got here because of google. It seems both you and I were confused by the file /etc/grub.d/01_enable_vga.conf You want to have the file contain the cat command, you don't want to create it with cat (well, you can create it with nested cat). So try this: sudo bash -c "cat > /etc/grub.d/01_enable_vga.conf" << END cat <&...


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Please see my post and my own answer to an identical problem on Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS here. The trick is to turn on TPM in bios settings. As I understand it, you need TPM ON or ACTIVE for storing and looking up keys. Let us know if this helps.


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First of all, you should increase the size for Windows 7 partition to somewhat like 20 GB to 25 GB. Make another bootable USB for your Linux installation. Install Windows in your Windows petition and then install Ubuntu with the Live USB. Select the respective partition and mount root directory to it, then you should mount your /home directory to remaining ...


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From your question it seems you don't have experience with Linux. I suggest you install Ubuntu in a dual-boot (alongside Windows) instead of replacing Windows. The installer shouldn't delete your files, but things can go wrong for a number of reasons, especially when doing something like installing an OS, so having an external backup of your important ...


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So, it seems like GRUB was properly installed on the MBR, but the BIOS was not booting in the right order. These were the steps to resolve: Change boot order in BIOS to boot from MBR (for me, this was choosing the option for the Hard Disk that didn't say UEFI). Boot into Ubuntu. Run sudo os-prober Run sudo update-grub Reboot


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Try again. I succeeded by writing the iso on a DVD. I've got Windows 7 and Ubuntu 18.04 and this one runs much faster than Windows.


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The solution to this problem was given by oldfred in his comment, also in step 8 in the question Acer Aspire E15 will not dual boot. The issue was in the BIOS the SATA Mode setting was set to RST with Optane. Once I set the SATA mode to AHCI Ubuntu was able to recognize the SSD.


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Although installing Ubuntu alongside Windows in a dual-boot configuration shouldn't, and typically doesn't, cause any data loss, it is nonetheless a very good idea for you to have a backup, at least of your documents and any other important files, that is, files you would be upset if you lost. I'd say the three chief reasons for this are that: There's a ...


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I could solve the problem by Activating UEFI boot ( it was working with Legacy since UEFI is not recommended for my HP) Changing boot priority order in UEFI to OS Boot Manager at top I did not have enough time to try the other solutions, but I appreciate them as well.


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Windows 10 Anniversary Update, and the more recent Windows 10 Creators Update, have a really bad habit of wiping out Linux partitions on MBR disks. Microsoft has known about this bug for quite some time, but has chosen not to fix it. Sounds like you're a victim. Recovery is possible, but it can be tricky. Boot to the Ubuntu Live DVD/USB. Open Software &...


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HOW TO "UPDATE-GRUB" FROM WITHIN CHROOT Boot from your Ubuntu USB Thumb drive in Linux Live mode. Make sure your BIOS boots the USB drive in the correct mode (UEFI vs. Legacy/MBR) for your system, or else you'll have major problems getting update-grub to work. Once booted into live Linux, open a Terminal and start working through these commands: mkdir ...


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Just started experimenting with sharing a series of directories on btrfs between windows and linux since that driver seems to work alright. I feel like you don't want to commingle your dotfiles, I can't think of any collisions, and maybe they would be good collisions? (/home/user && C:\Users\user) ~/Documents --> /dev/sdXX/user/documents ...


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Apparently your windows partition should be intact unless you deleted that. I faced kind of same issues when I dual booted my system. Make sure to install Linux in the same mode windows is installed (Legacy or UEFI), otherwise you won't be able to boot into windows. If you've already done the same and somehow grub is unable to map windows partition. Try ...


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try upgrading to an SSD or SSHD. hard disks does'nt work well for laptops (SSHD's also, but it's better than hard disks) . if you are on a desktop, try a new hard disk or SSD.


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This could be a difficult question to answer. The simplest answer is to install fresh, but that sucks if you have a lot of data/customization already invested in your old install. If it were my machine, I would boot up Ubuntu in live mode from my Ubuntu USB install thumb drive and start poking around at the hard disk to try to figure out what has gone ...


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It depends on your partitioning scheme: If your Windows and Ubuntu partitions are separate: No issue, but make a full system backup using CloneZilla Live anyway. If you have something completely different from the standard or any of the partitioning options in the above question, definitely make a full system backup using CloneZilla Live!!!


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You can edit the fstab file in Live Ubuntu. Mount your root partition - sudo mount /dev/sda5 /mnt, then sudo gedit /mnt/etc/fstab. Fstab will load as a text file which you can then edit. First before you edit make a copy of the fstab file (fstab2). Remove all lines with /dev/sdb1 and My Passport. If sda3 is your Windows system, why have you allocated so ...


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As Neo said it is possible to upgrade your Ubuntu to 18.04 without affecting the Windows partition. You can use any of the method you stated yourself. Since both OS are in different partition they wont interfere with other partitions unless specified to do so. In my opinion it is better to turn off the Firewall temporarily than to make a custom rule to ...


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You can upgrade your Ubuntu using terminal and it will not affect your other partitions. You can do that with: sudo do-release-upgrade See how to do that in detail here. Even if you install the newer or other version using live disk it will not affect your Windows unless you erase the whole HDD or edit the partitioning of your HDD. See how to do that here....


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Steps to install Ubuntu 18.04 alongside pre installed Windows 10 as dual boot in NVMe SSD. Hardware Information: Dell G5 5587 Core i7 8750H RAM 16 GB NVMe SSD (Toshiba) 256 GB HDD 1 TB NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 1060 6GB GDDR5 with Max-Q Design Download Files Download Ubuntu iso file from Ubuntu website. Download Rufus from Rufus website. Burn the ISO to a ...


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this Help Wiki may be of help to you.


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Another dumb solution for Ubuntu 18.04 reboot stuck: I had an American Megatrends BIOS. Once I changed the OS Selection from Windows 7 to Windows 8.X the problem disappeared.


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In UBUNTU the ssd will have nvme0n[n1]p[n2] as device name and the hdd will have sd[c1][n2] where [n1] is the hard disk number, [n2] is the partition number, [c1] is a letter indicating the hard disk number. Mind that this is related to a HP Omen. Other systems might have an older ssd version: nvme is a M.2 SSD. That is a newer type of SSD. Info from my hp ...


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Fixed it. I went out today and bought a new USB C stick, and it's booting from that just fine. I don't know if it's because the other one was a USB A going through an adapter, or was just a "dodgy" stick. I had tried burning the old one a couple of times, with Ubuntu 19.04 and 18.04 but it was having none of it, so I don't think I was doing anything wrong ...


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what you need to do is boot to a ubuntu live USB (either use the one you used to install or if you reformatted it since then, make a new one) and then install ubuntu. that's it. it'll detect windows durring the installation (say install allongside windows) and after it's done you'll be able to boot both. (next time you want to switch os do this ...


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Turns out setting fast boot to disabled in bios isn't enough, I had to change the power button settings on windows too.


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Thanks to all who responded. Great ideas and thanks for all the links. I think I'll make an image of the Windows install so I don't have to go through the hassle of downloading all the specific drivers. Then I'll partition as needed and apparently I need to make sure the Ubuntu partition is UEFI. Headed out on vaca for a few weeks so I'll give it a try when ...


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Alright guys, after tackling this harsh problem for a long time and leaving no stone unturned and trying every possible method on the planet from removing the CMOS to plugging the laptop to other monitors to putting the hard drives away to see what happens when i turn the thing on... i finally had to hand it to a computer man who left no other choices for me ...


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I would recomend booting back ontot the live USB you used to install ubuntu, opening a terminal with these keystrokes: Ctrl+Alt+T and pasting this command into it : sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair && sudo apt update && sudo apt install -y boot-repair boot-info this will fix your dual boot, putting back grub. you'll ...


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This is an awesome question, and I had actually been considering doing this for a while. Ended up finally taking the plunge, and it seems to work fine. (I used the latest version of Ubuntu Desktop and Windows 10 v.1903 for this.) While I'm unsure about whether BitLocker's system drive encryption would play nice with Linux's dm-crypt/LUKS encryption, ...


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