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2

Microsoft recently updated the minimum hardware requirements. For updated versions of Windows 10 (1903) they now recommend "32 GB or greater" for both 32bit and 64bit. I personally recommend at least 50 GB, but that heavily depends on the use case.


0

This is Windows 10 minimum requirements: Hard disk space: 16 GB for 32-bit OS 20 GB for 64-bit OS. But its better to leave more disk space for working fine...


0

I suggest that you do three things... - Use the Disks app to check the SMART Data & Tests Edit your question with a screenshot of the SMART Data and I'll take a look run the SMART Tests - fsck your Ubuntu partition boot to a Ubuntu Live DVD/USB open a terminal window type sudo fdisk -l identify the /dev/XXXX device name for your "Linux Filesystem" ...


-2

I would recommend rEFInd: https://www.rodsbooks.com/refind/ Trying to use two different GUID's can be complicated, because you have to manually edit and configure grub.


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/boot/efi is a subdirectory of /boot, so it should be obvious that none of this folders is a replacement for the other. /boot/efi is the default mount-point for the ESP (EFI System Partition), that's the partition where boot-loaders are going to be installed. Boot-loaders are stored on different folders in the ESP, so they can coexist in the same partition. ...


4

Thank you all for the assistance. I have spent 2+ days on this and finally stumbled on the solution from here: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/broadcom-sta/+bug/1777444 sudo apt-get purge bcmwl-kernel-source sudo apt-get install broadcom-sta-dkms sudo reboot


0

For Ubuntu 19.04 (Linux Kernel 5.0), the following parameters made the ThinkPad boot: ivrs_ioapic[32]=00:14.0 ivrs_ioapic[33]=00:00.1 and black screen on resume from suspend/sleep with closed lid could be solved with iommu=pt These parmeters are applied in /etc/default/grub in the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT variable and set via sudo update-grub


1

I'm running Manjaro and Arch but, ironically, Manjaro will make a similar mistake as Ubuntu. So perhaps the following patch in 30_os_prober can still help someone. After: LINITRD="`echo ${LINUX} | cut -d ':' -f 5 | tr '^' ' '`" Add: if [ "${OS}" = "Arch Linux" ] ; then LINITRD="/boot/intel-ucode.img ${LINITRD}" fi


1

No, not as in telling the system to swap the files on each disk. Quickest method is likely: make a backup of your personal files. reinstall. restore the backup. I have a problem. I installed ubuntu on hdd, and mount one of ssd partition to /home. Why is that a problem? You have the directory that requires the most space (/home) already on the largest ...


3

The confusion here comes from the inconsistent usage of two unit prefixes, metric/SI and binary. Technically correct would be: 1 GB = 1 Gigabyte = 1000³ byte = 1.000.000.000 byte 1 GiB = 1 Gibibyte = 1024³ byte = 1.073.741.824 byte Unfortunately the term Gibibyte is not very commonly used, at least colloquially, and instead Gigabyte (or GB) is often used ...


0

128 * 1.024 * 1.024 = 134.2, maybe it's due to the difference between Gigabytes and Gibibytes.


1

In Windows, have you installed a driver that allows you to read/write to Linux ext2/3/4 partitions? If so, that's what's corrupting Ubuntu. Uninstall it asap. Your file system is corrupt. See if this manual fsck can fix it... boot to a Ubuntu Live DVD/USB open a terminal window type sudo fdisk -l identify the /dev/XXXX device name for your "Linux ...


0

I found solution: When GRUB is open click E and change from "quiet splash" to nothing, just delete. After that Ubuntu will open. Open terminal and write "sudo nano /etc/deafult/grub" on line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" delete "quiet splash". After that it looks like this GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT= save this and write in terminal: "sudo ...


0

During installation of ubuntu two option come to us: One of them "Install alongside windows" another procedure is customizing hard drive partition and installing which is mentioned as "something else" during installation. The process you are going on is not right.Whatever you do you have to install grub boot loader on same drive so that u can boot windows ...


0

I have repaired the grub after long hours of hunting. These are the steps I took boot ubuntu from a live USB Open terminal and run sudo su dd if=/dev/zero of=/cowfile bs=1024 count=1024 mkfs.fat /cowfile mv /cowfile /cow This creates a 1MB file with a FAT filesystem in it, and moves it to /cow, which is the “fake” path that grub-mkconfig can’t find. With it ...


0

I had a similar problem (no boot, no grub) that I fixed by: Read man grub-install Boot from a Live USB key. Open a terminal window Ctrl-Alt-T Do sudo grub-install /dev/sda Note: I also did sudo grub-install /dev/sda1, but I don't think it helped my problem.


0

With a live CD, in the terminal do and follow instructions: sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair and look at the website.


0

I had this same problem. To fix it, I went into the UEFI and disabled Secure Boot. After saving the settings and rebooting I was able to use the new kernel.


2

Set GRUB_DEFAULT=0 in both systems (don't forget sudo update-grub). Then install additional instances of grub to your ESP, from 16.04 run sudo grub-install --bootloader-id=Server16.04 and from 18.04 run sudo grub-install --bootloader-id=Server18.04 Check your boot-menu-entries with efibootmgr -v. Example: $ efibootmgr -v BootCurrent: 0001 Timeout: 0 ...


0

This was all very helpful, but in the end, it was missing a small bit for me and it wouldn't work until I added in all the parts. set root='(hd0,2)' linux /cm-x86-14.1-r2/kernel quiet root=/dev/ram0 androidboot.selinux=permissive buildvariant=userdebug initrd /cm-x86-14.1-r2/initrd.img As posted by Banan3'14 was right, but it was missing: search --no-...


1

This has nothing to do with dual booting it's user error, what you're seeing is just a normal boot without the 'Splash screen' and it doesn't actually show any errors, think of the boot sequence as a log for everything the OS does during boot, now, the last entry in this log is "started hold until boot process finishes up" a quick google search sends you to ...


1

The best way of cloning Ubuntu from one drive to another, or one partition to another, is with a script that resets UUID's in /boot/grub/grub.cfg and /etc/fstab like this one: Bash script to backkup/clone Ubuntu to another partition If you simply clone with a tool that doesn't change UUID's you need to use boot-repair as demonstrated here: How to make ...


0

Actually, I did not know, but it seems to be possible to do this in VirtualBox as well: You'll first want to create a virtual machine within the VirtualBox GUI. Choose all options like normal, but when asked about the virtual hard drive, select Do not add a virtual hard drive. Issue fdisk to list the partitions and find the Windows partition: sudo ...


0

It is indeed possible with KVM (reproduced below). You will need an UEFI implementation which you can download and there are a bunch of options you need to set for qemu. The following should work on Intel chipsets with sound. You probably want to test without sound and networking first. WARNING: do not attempt to boot your host OS or its drive in the VM or ...


0

Are you using ubuntu 18.04 or newer? if yes, it depends on your motherboard and you need 64 bit computer. If no, I recommend using ubuntu 16.04 LTS. you cannot download it on ubuntu.com, but on releases.ubuntu.com


0

Hi and welcome to AskUbuntu! Yes, it works. You can only boot into Windows or Linux at a time, so they don't have to share the 2GB RAM. But you will need to split your HDD into 2 partitions (the Ubuntu installer will do guide you with this).


0

I was able to solve this issue. In BIOS settings, under startup, I selected BOTH (enabling UEFI and Legacy) and under preference, I selected UEFI first. After this, I was able to install the ubuntu fine. Thanks


2

This answer was originally posted by the asker as an edit to the question and a comment. Switch to AHCI, run boot-repair and switch back to RAID.


0

I'm answering my own question (even though this is a bit stupid) since I just found a solution myself and I want to share it to help others. I entered live system with a live usb and tried grub repair tool following this instruction. Then, I can boot into my system correctly even though a few new options appear in my grub menu. Still not sure what caused ...


0

List your current setup Your setup is similar to mine: $ lsblk -o NAME,FSTYPE,LABEL,MOUNTPOINT,SIZE,MODEL |egrep -v "^loop" NAME FSTYPE LABEL MOUNTPOINT SIZE MODEL nvme0n1 477G Samsung SSD 960 PRO 512GB ├─nvme0n1p9 swap [SWAP] 7.9G ├─nvme0n1p7 ext4 ...


0

@Marmayogi Thank you for your answer. You explain me how to do proceed quite well. But I followed your explainations step by step and here are my results: 512 BG Disk window Mount Options sub-window Output for $ sudo ln -s F8D42178D4213A70 SharedPartition and ls -l /mnt/ : total 4 drwxrwxrwx 1 root root 4096 May 9 20:17 F8D42178D4213A70 lrwxrwxrwx 1 ...


0

The answer above didn't work for my friend's HP Pavilion, but I found a decent workaround. It seems that HP's firmware always overwrites the BootOrder on every boot and sets Windows first, but it still respects BootNext. So I wrote a startup script to set BootNext on every boot. Run efibootmgr to find the numeric code of BootCurrent. In my friend's case ...


1

Automounting indeed involves adding a line to the configuration file /etc/fstab. The line contains six fields, separated by a space or tab, (1) the reference to the device you want to mount (device name or reference to UUID or LABEL), (2) the mount point, i.e., the folder where the mounted device is going to appear, (3) the file system, (4) the mount options,...


0

The supposed duplicate answer did not work. This is how I finally solved this issue after hours of research, hope this will help someone: 1. Boot Ubuntu Live Version from USB 2. In gparted, create a new 200 MiB partition (FAT-32) 3. Move it to the very front (left) of the hard-drive. 4. Right click the new partition and flag it as esp and boot. IT WILL LOOK ...


2

This applies to most Acer models (Problems generally faced with Predator and other gaming laptops): For normal Ubuntu installation: Update to the latest BIOS (I know, it's UEFI, but I'm going to call it a BIOS). Shut down, then while starting back up hit the F2 button many times until the BIOS Setup Utility loads. In the "Main" menu, set the "F12 Boot Menu"...


0

Just update-grub put the new installation at the end of the list, my concern was unjustified. Thanks for the help PRATAP . It seems a long way around but life's short and that works!


1

You can not resize partition in use, so since you boot from it - you need another bootable media. Make backup of important documents/files, resize operation may fail and you'll loose everything Charge to 100% if you have battery Make a bootable USB with Ubuntu. One of possible ways Boot from it, choose try without installing in boot menu Run gparted and ...


1

Questioner @Bravo2bad, you have your sample file.txt file lodged into NTFS partitioned disk in Windows 10. Before accessing that file in read-write mode from Ubuntu, you should mark the partition as rw. Normally, every one will attempt to make an entry in /etc/fstab directly which is considered as normal practice. Nevertheless, for a change, let us do it ...


1

I would start with the Ubuntu live CD (writing the ISO to a USB stick if necessary, there are tutorials for how to do that). If you are able to run it without installing it to disk (via RAM and the livecd) and use the hardware on your machine without any issues, then you could proceed to the installation wizard.


0

A LiveUSB works entirely in your computer's PC, writing nothing to disk, until you tell it to install something. An initial ramdisk loads a temporary root file system into memory then the Linux startup begins. That's what's taking up your memory, and once the installation completes and the PC reboots, the memory consumption goes away. FYI, all LiveUSB ...


0

Yes, you can! Virtualize Mohave, and run it under Virtual Box, with Ubuntu as the Host OS, as per this tutorial. Install VirtualBox 5.x or newer, plus Git, with this command in a terminal: sudo apt update && sudo apt-get install virtualbox virtualbox-dkms virtualbox-ext-pack virtualbox-guest-additions-iso virtualbox-guest-utils virtualbox-qt git ...


0

Boot mode (legacy vs EFI) matters. Grub is not able to chainload a bootloader in a different boot mode, so to achieve a proper multi-boot, all OS's must be installed in the same boot mode. It seems to be a common mistake to install in the wrong boot mode. From the little information in the question I couldn't be 100% sure, but it looked like your Windows is ...


-1

You can edit your grub.conf file to order your boot options however you want. Use your favorite editor (VIM, nano, pico, etc) and just put Ubuntu at the top of the list or Windows at the bottom of the list and reboot your machine to verify the options are listed how you like.


2

Your problem is that Ubuntu (and thus grub) was installed in UEFI mode and Windows 10 was upgraded from a Windows 7 in BIOS mode. Both boot systems are not compatible with one another and now you need to go into your BIOS settings to choose between legacy mode to boot Win10 and UEFI for Ubuntu. If this is a fresh install, set your system back to BIOS boot ...


0

This happens when using two disks instead of just partitioning the drive Windows is on. Or, this can be cause by Grub not identifying the drive Windows is on. Your best option should be reinstalling Ubuntu on the main drive and partitioning it from windows.


0

The most quick solution did you have is to create a partition with a filesystem it is compatible with both OS (as my suggestion NTFS is a good choose), like this the data are available on both OS. In this case you have to think that the files created have to follow the windows rules, you have to consider NTFS as filesystem case insensitive; so a file of ...


0

You need to boot from a live disk, since you can't manipulate a partition you booted from. Then run gparted. https://gparted.org/display-doc.php%3Fname%3Dmoving-space-between-partitions


0

So you are using your system with DUAL boot, Winodws+Ubuntu. It's a pretty common problem with dual boot and seems to be an issue with GRUB boot loader. You can repair it by going to GRUB boot menu and open the os in recovery mode (check this article about How to repair Ubuntu). You can also choose to install a fresh copy of your system via keeping your old ...


0

You can set the default OS with grub depending on time, see Can GRUB be scheduled? This means: changing default 'entry' (auto login) at defined periods of time automatically?. So, for example, you can configure grub to boot to Windows when $MINUTE is odd and boot to Linux when $MINUTE is even. insmod datehook if [ $MINUTE -eq 0 -o $MINUTE -eq 2 -o $...


1

If you want to experiment with grub, you can use the grub command line (hit c when you are in grub menu). You should see the grub prompt : grub> If you want to be safe for experimenting, I would suggest using a virtual machine (with VirtualBox for example). Once in grub command line interface, you can enter the commands like you would in your /boot/...


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