47

What worked for me was removing any broken packages, as they were preventing the upgrade. First find out which packages are broken: grep Broken /var/log/dist-upgrade/apt.log Then remove them: sudo apt-get remove <packages to remove> Some might be reinstalled during the upgrade, others you may have to reinstall yourself.


43

Important Security Notice This answer will disable an critical security feature in Ubuntu. It will stop Ubuntu checking packages are the the same as they were when they were built. This could mean your updates are compromised or corrupt. This could mean there's just a bug in the way Ubuntu's release upgrades are handled. I'm not saying you ...


39

This is an issue that has appeared before: 4 years ago when upgrading from 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) to 14.04.1 LTS (Trusty Tahr): Why is "No new release found" when upgrading from a LTS to the next? It looks like a similar issue exists for the upgrade from 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) to 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) with the relevant update log not ...


34

It looks like the culprit is /etc/update-motd.d/91-release-upgrade This calls /usr/lib/ubuntu-release-upgrader/release-upgrade-motd This file checks for the file /var/lib/ubuntu-release-upgrader/release-upgrade-available If that exists, it goes in the motd. If it doesn't, it calls /usr/lib/ubuntu-release-upgrader/check-new-release. That last command ...


32

do-release-upgrade is part of the package “update-manager-core”. The script seems to determine which release you are going to upgrade to, try to find out if it’s supported or not and complain about the latter. – If it’s convinced to work, it downloads the release-specific UpgradeTool and runs it. Part of the “update-manager-core” package is the file /etc/...


29

After your system fails to upgrade, check the file /var/log/dist-upgrade/main.log I found the line: 2013-10-17 15:00:30,543 ERROR Dist-upgrade failed: 'The package 'xubuntu-desktop' is marked for removal but it is in the removal blacklist.' I manually removed xubuntu-desktop. The upgrade then continued without issue.


23

I just ran into this problem on Pop!_OS 18.04, trying to upgrade to 18.10, and it turns out that the problem lay in the symlink for /usr/bin/python and not for /usr/bin/python3. I had had /usr/bin/python3.6 configured as an alternative for python (not python3), and when I changed this, then I could run do-release-upgrade as expected. I wish the error ...


20

No. Ubuntu does have LTS→LTS upgrades, allowing you to skip intermediate non-LTS releases... But you can't skip intermediate LTS releases. You have to go via 16.04. Unless you want to do a fresh install of 18.04 on release. I should also note that the LTS upgrade pathways are usually only available some time after the main release. So don't expect to be ...


18

I had the exact same error. The solution I found in order to upgrade the remaining last 2 packages was: sudo su - cd /boot/efi/EFI mv ubuntu ubuntu-old apt install -f mv ubuntu-old ubuntu update-grub2 exit I hope it helps.


15

Test this: Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: sudo -i apt-get update apt-get autoremove apt-get clean UNUSCONF=$(dpkg -l|grep "^rc"|awk '{print $2}') apt-get remove --purge $UNUSCONF NEWKERNEL=$(uname -r|sed 's/-*[a-z]//g'|sed 's/-386//g') ADDKERNEL="linux-(image|headers|ubuntu-modules|restricted-modules)" METAKERNEL="linux-(image|headers|...


13

First, advice to others who want to install a beta version, besides the classic "backup your data": if update-manager -d fails with too many errors and does not rewind what it has done, do not force a restart. close update-manager, if necessary, kill the process. do an apt-get -f install, followed by apt full-upgrade. Repeat with apt update and apt full-...


13

important production system I would not upgrade a system like that. I would install 16.04 on another machine, copy the live data over to that machine. Test, test some more. And then make that machine the production server. And you can redo this with 18.04 with the current 14.04 server. Why take risks at all?


13

You have to mount your ESP. This should work with: sudo mount /boot/efi If you get an error message like mount: can't find /boot/efi in /etc/fstab you have to add a line to your /etc/fstab e.g. UUID=XXXX-XXXX /boot/efi vfat umask=0077 0 1 replace the XXXX-XXXX with the UID of your ESP (e.g. from the output of blkid /dev/sdxX or ...


12

Your original guess was right. 15.04 is supported through 2016-02-04, so do-release-upgrade is trying to upgrade you to the next supported release compared to the one you have. Here's the description of normal upgrade prompting mode from /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades: Check to see if a new release is available. If more than one new release is ...


12

If do-release-upgrade fails, you might need to edit the release-updates file. Open that file with a text editor (e.g. nano) nano /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades Edit the last line to say: Prompt=normal Then run do-release-upgrade (without the -d flag) When the upgrade is complete, edit that line again to say Prompt=lts


12

You need to use the default Python 3 version for 16.04. That's 3.5, not 3.6. So run: sudo ln -sf /usr/bin/python3.5 /usr/bin/python3 If that doesn't work, try reinstalling the python3 package. sudo apt-get install --reinstall python3 By the way, update-alternatives --display python3 should give you update-alternatives: error: no alternatives for python3. ...


11

To fix your first problem run this in a terminal: sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/*.disable (An older version of the package management tool left these files when you disabled the PPAs. Removing them is pretty safe) Your second problem comes from and old Karmic repository. To find out which one run this in a terminal: cd /etc/apt grep -rw karmic * Once ...


11

No. There never will be another Ubuntu that is 32-bit. You will need to switch to an alternative. Some of the official flavors intend to keep 32-bit in their arsenal. But I would assume they will stick to LTS for 32-bit. 3 examples: Budgie. 18.04 is 64 and 32. 19.04 is 64 only. No 18.10 download. Xubuntu 18.04 is 64 and 32. 19.04 is 64 only. No 18.10 ...


10

Try executing: grep ERROR /var/log/dist-upgrade/main.log Hopefully this will show you the names of conflicting packages. For me it was (I broken long line to be easier to read): 2014-10-25 18:15:05,915 ERROR Dist-upgrade failed: 'The package 'postgresql-9.3-postgis-2.1' is marked for removal but it is in the removal blacklist. postgresql-9.3-...


9

I wrote a script to do this, for my own upgrade of multiple machines to Ubuntu 14.04 "trusty". It is called 'apt-get-other-release'. Simple use: $ sudo apt-get-other-release -t trusty [ a long time passes as it downloads stuff ] $ sudo apt-get-other-release -U [ it prepares the system for upgrade -- this is quick ] $ sudo do-release-upgrade # or ...


9

There won't be any special notifications for this. Just do the standard updates. sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade.


8

You are viewing the output of diff old-conf-file new-conf-file | more. Simply press Q to exit.


8

I doubt there is a perfect method. A method could be to check the date of creation of the filesystem: sudo tune2fs -l /dev/sda1 | grep 'Filesystem created:' Filesystem created: Thu Mar 5 15:51:50 2015 The system I pulled this from was created on March 5th 2015. Of course it is entirely possible to install 14.10 on March the 5th and then upgrade ...


8

It seems like there is an issue about certificates: result of meta-release download: <urlopen error [SSL: CERTIFICATE_VERIFY_FAILED] certificate verify failed (_ssl.c:841)> As a workaround, I edited the file /usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/UpdateManager/Core/MetaRelease.py and added these lines to the beginning: import ssl ssl....


7

You can check the release you'll get with do-release-upgrade by adding the -c flag like so: do-release-upgrade -c As far I understand, there is not yet an upgrade possibility for upgrading 12.04 LTS to 16.04 without going step by step (i.e. to 14.04 on the first run), so do-release-upgrade can be expected to do exactly what you want.


7

After changing the setting in /etc/update-manager/releases-upgrades from lts to normal, you need to run sudo apt-get update.


7

On release date, the ISO's are made available. It's a few days before meta-release is updated for 19.04 installs, which means they don't detect the availability of 19.10. Release days are always Thursdays for Ubuntu (and flavors), however it's not usually till the following Monday-Tuesday that the taps or switch is pulled that allows existing 19.04 systems ...


6

There is a way to get the update manager to do steps 1-3 for you. Run sudo update-manager from a terminal window in the GUI (this is important) Start the update manager, tell it you want to upgrade to the next version of Ubuntu, and let it start running. It will disable 3rd party repositories, change the main repositories to the latest version, and then ...


6

The reason you get 14.04 as an upgrade option is because you are running an LTS version at the moment and the next LTS release is 14.04, and you are only having that possibility because you are using the -d flag (development). You should not upgrade your servers to a under development version. To enable release upgrades from a LTS you need to tell the ...


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