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You could try switching to proprietary drivers. For example, I have GTX 1650 and for it to work properly I had to install proprietary drivers. Ubuntu allows doing this quite easy: Search for Additinol Drivers applicaton in Activities search field Choose the driver you need and click on Apply Changes


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This is an old thread. Just wanted to update it. These days the program arandr - a GUI frontend for xrandr is available. For ubuntu-based distros, use apt to install: sudo -H apt install arandr


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Pop_OS is unsupported by Canonical, you should consult with developers of this system. In Ubuntu xrandr works in Xorg session. To switch to Xorg : log out . Click gear in bottom-right corner and select Ubuntu on Xorg. Log in. Check a name of your video output , current video mode and allowed refresh rates : xrand Then switch to some mode (example for ...


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This is how I came to a solution. I took help from this article. We need to generate a modeline We do so by going into terminal and typing “gtf x y r” where x is the horizontal resolution, y is the vertical resolution and r is the refresh rate (which is largely irrelevant since LCDs are the norm). So for example, mine was: gtf 1024 768 85 Once you’ve ...


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it's frustating when youre in serious development deadline and suddenly shit like these happen. Please try running commands from [1] It worked for me. Reboot needed. [1]: https://ostechnix.com/how-to-fix-broken-ubuntu-os-without-reinstalling-it/


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The reason why you have blurry (or pixelated) fonts is because Ubuntu is scaling the font size without changing the font size (like what you do in Word). It other words it is taking a SVG image, rasterizing it, and instead rescaling from the font's SVG image which would yield a good quality, it just scaled up the rasterized font version (created by Ubuntu, ...


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I figured out that AnyDesk seems to have changed the kernel and now Ubuntu cannot recognize my monitor. I couldn't find the xorg.config file and where it changed the kernel. Gave up and a fresh reinstall of Ubuntu fixed it.


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A better way than creating a script would be to configure X properly. Reboot in recovery mode Create a new xorg.conf file Xorg -configure Reboot in graphical mode. From a terminal, generate the proper settings for your desired resolution using gtf command gtf 1600 1200 60. Copy the output and using your favorite editor add it to the section Monitor of the ...


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Through the centuries I have since figured this out. The solution is not to apply 0.5x0.5 scaling, but to adjust the DPI. I didn't think the DPI adjustments were working because you need to refresh i3 to see them (Mod+shift+r) I added the following to ~/.Xresources: Xft.dpi: 192 I then ran the following commands: xrdb -merge .Xresources exec i3 I then ran ...


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just go to settings > accessibilty > Large Text -this will chage the size to windows like if you are partiularly looking for this.


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