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0

I think I had same problem as you and I solved by reading this https://itsfoss.com/fix-ubuntu-freezing/ . My Kubuntu updated itself and it was stuck at boot. It's mainly because of the Nvidia driver, by default it's not using the proprietary Nvidia driver. I switched to the proprietary Nvidia driver then it can boot normally.


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It looks like the layout option does not work with custom grub settings. The installer code appears to only use the grub configuration when layout is not used. You can try submitting a bug report at https://bugs.launchpad.net/subiquity if you think that is the wrong behavior. Testing - using Ubuntu 20.04.3 (subiquity 21.08.2). Using this configuration in ...


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Contrary to popular belief, there's nothing in a legacy install of Ubuntu that wont boot/run in UEFI mode. No "conversions" necessary. You probably should do a few things like: Add the /boot/efi mount point for the EFI (so any future updates of grub/shim will work). Add the fstab line to mount /boot/efi (totally non-critical to running). Change ...


1

I hope I understood correct you question. Please add to /etc/default/grub GRUB_DEFAULT=saved GRUB_SAVEDEFAULT=true then run afterwards sudo update-grub Boot up your desired kernel and for it will be set as default the following boots. For explanation please read info -f grub -n 'Simple configuration'


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For people who may have such problem in the future: I fixed the problem (without understanding it of course) by using the "Boot Repair Disk" from https://sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair-cd/home/Home/ I followed instructions and chose "recommended repair" and somehow the problem got fixed.


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You can enter the boot device selection on IMacs by holding alt. I am using a Mac and in my experience spamming Alt during boot works better. You can also try to spam esc during boot to enter GRUB. If you end up in a commandline type exit and try to immediately press esc again. Something else that has caused me issues before is an international keyboard. ...


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A WORKAROUND Disclaimer: IT DID WORK ON MY MACHINE: Linux Xubuntu 20.04 this does not mean this is the proper solution, or even a "solver", but, rather a by-passer so to speak. My pc specifications: Motherboard: ASUS, B450M Processor: AMD Ryzen 7 5700G, 8-Core, 16-Threads, 3.8GHz (4.6GHz Turbo), Cache 20MB, AM4, 100-100000263BOX RAM: Team Group ...


2

Not sure what your intentions are for other OSes on the Sandisk, but I'd suggest installing grub onto the Sandisk (you did make an EFI partition on it, right?) or just copy everything on the internal disk's EFI to the Sandisk's EFI works too, no edits needed. The grub-install does work, check the options needed like --removable and --uefi-secure-boot and --...


1

Kernel complains that it did not find init. Did you specify a root filesystem in uboot boot command? Or an initramfs? At some point during it's initialization, kernel starts 'init' from such rootfs, initrd or initramfs. Usually, this is /init or /sbin/init. It can also now start systemd init. The task started here gets PID 1. If pid 1 exits, kernel panics. ...


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You can boot into recovery mode from the Grub menu and this will bypass the kernel arguments on GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT. From recovery mode, you will be able to edit your /etc/default/grub file to remove the arguments. Also, don't forget to run sudo update-grub to apply the changes after you are finished editing the file. To explain: arguments listed ...


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Might not be the best answer, but I managed to solve this by doing the following in the default grub.cfg (thanks to Andrew's answer here: https://askubuntu.com/a/1272415/1094816): set default=auto set timeout=10 menuentry 'Ubuntu 20.04 - autoinstall' --id=auto { linux /vmlinuz ip=dhcp url=http://${pxe_default_server}/tftp/ubuntu-20.04-live-server-...


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I had exactly the same problem! I guess your hosting provider is OVH? I get through it by re-booting in "network mode", which gives me the right to log in by ssh and the capacity to remove the snapd installation with apt. After that, I could reboot normally.


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Try entering insmod normal and then type normal to see if the system can boot normally from here.


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Seems to me like a problem with your level 2 cache. And for what I see 70 Celsius just running a mem test is pretty high. Does it get enough air. At what temps did it run before? If it has to do some real work the temps will go up. Can you disable level 2 cache in your BIOS/UEFI? Can you put another processor in your laptop ( have 1 laying around or can you ...


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Do you want to show the grub-menu when starting up your computer? If that is the question, then you have to use 'GRUB_TIMEOUT=60' (is time in seconds, so 60 is 1 minute ). You have to edit the file 'grub', which is located in /etc/default. You have to do this as 'root', so use sudo in your terminal. You can use the program 'gedit' to change the file. btw I ...


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The only thing I can think of in your case would be to use a different computer to install a live-boot operating system on an external hard drive. Then, plug that drive into the machine you're having issues with. Since the main disk is read-only, the PC should automatically default to the next available option for re-boot, which would be external drives.


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You may add fsck.mode=skip in the file /etc/default/grub in line with the parameter GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT : GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash fsck.mode=skip" Then run: sudo update-grub


-1

The same just happened to me after upgrading from the earlier version, groovy gorilla. With a white screen of death in between. Followed this for that. I managed to get past by choosing an earlier kernel version for ubuntu from the Grub menu -> Ubuntu, with Linux 5.11.0.40-generic


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Very specific solution for me: In recovery mode, disable automatic login for your user. I found it will make Ubuntu VM stuck at startup if you have Home folder encryption active and enable automatic login.


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SSD fast & small, HDD slow & big. So if you have efi, boot, system, programs and home configuration on SSD, your pc is ready for use in a few seconds, so will be also all your applications. Then one (or two) partition on HDD for all the rest. This is what I do on my pc. I find it useful to have a /home partition, but I use it only for personal ...


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Personal opinion: use the full ssd for your system no swap partition; we use a dynamic swapfile nowadays no /home/ mount the hdd on a personal mountpoint and after install move the directories in /home/$USER/ to the personal partition. edit ./config/user-dirs.dirs to point to the new setup and keep a copy on your hdd. Pro's: the / and the config files ...


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It was possible to install Ubuntu 20.04. without error using an USB device instead of a DVD.


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It appears that trying out a new USB stick worked perfectly. The old stick has been malfunctioning lately. Many thanks to @ChanganAuto to remind me of this possibility.


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You can use this hack it half worked for me: I have the same problem that Fluffy_Alpaca: I could not boot my computer because of a freeze of the screen at startup. By the way, the problem is the same for other guys (Ubuntu 20.04 LTS freezing at boot/startup, Ubuntu freezing time to time) in this forum but no solution are sufficiently generic to be used. ...


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One way to do this very simple in Ubuntu 20 is: Right click over your .iso file. Open with other application. Select Disk Image Writer When ask to restore Disk Image, select your USB target Click on Start Restoring. And that should be all!!.


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Okay I found the solution after tinkering around GRUB. Thanks @ChanganAuto for indicating to me the issue. But basically you have list the files on the Grub terminal: Grub> ls It should list all your mounted drives. Find the directory that contains your linux folder for example: Grub> ls (hd0,gpt3)/ Once you find the folder that contains the linux ...


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I sent the laptop to the technical support department. The said nothing was wrong but the problem was still there after some time of use. The solution was update to Ubuntu 21.10, no more issues, everything goes fine. Ubuntu 21.04 still had the same issue.


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to make your laptop/PC dual boot windows 10 and ubuntu 21 follow following steps go to disk management and create at least 50GB free space. 1.make bootable usb/CD for ubuntu21 2.check BIOS mode it may be either legecy or UFI you can by typing " system information" in search. If it is in legecy mode choose boot option follow the link https://youtu....


-1

Try Boot repair. Add Boot-Repair's repository to your software sources. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair && sudo apt update Install boot repair. sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && (boot-repair &) Run boot-repair. boot-repair Restart machine with sudo reboot Now you will be able to copy efi folder /boot/EFI/...


2

fsck /dev/sda4 -y This command will definitely work As it is written there /dev/sda4 needs a manual fsck this command just give the manual fsck As your problem was solved in comments only can you please click that ☑ check box and also up vote it?


0

perhaps it's worth trying another boot tool -- Rufus, pay attention to when creating USB stick, the target system should be EFI or UEFI and some reference info: Even page is for win10, Ubuntu is almost same. Click here and also pay attention to the BIOS setting as @user280493 pointed out, the first boot option should be "USB disk EFI usbDiskName", ...


0

You have done all of the troubleshooting that you can. An Ubuntu Core Appliance has no user access to a shell or to other troubleshooting tools. Please report the problem directly to the upstream authors. They created both the Snap and the Appliance.


-1

I'd suggest that Firstly, Backup Data! use Rufus(open source boot tool) to create a USB key to boot into Ubuntu. Reinstall the grub on disk, in Terminal, # use this if the disk is EFI system $ sudo grub-install --target x86_64-efi --boot-directory=/media/ubuntu/diskPath/ --efi-directory=/media/ubuntu/diskPath /dev/sdX # use this if the disk is legacy ...


1

It appears that your drive was corrupted when you interrupted it. I'm not sure if there's much more that you can do without taking it to someone to look at the drive. However, if you are fine with wiping your installation, try getting a copy of the GParted live ISO and using that to format your disk. Also, look in to using REISUB keys for killing your ...


0

SOLVED::::: I also had the same problem and managed to fix it. It has nothing to do with electricity in your computer. Just make sure the boot options match with the ones on your computers boot options. On my case i had booted ubuntu in GPT with UEFI without CSM but on the computer my boot options were set to UEFI with CSM. The solution was for me to change ...


-1

I ran into this issue and others today. It looks like an update occurred on my system, and installed a new kernel (5.13.0-21-generic), but messed a bunch of stuff up including the graphics drivers, and audio devices and video devices. The proprietary nvidia drivers use dkms to compile the driver against the kernel version. However, whatever happened on my ...


1

I created an issue on github, and some nice guy (harshadjs) helped me to fix this issue, writing patch for the app. It looks like, it was something wrong with e2fsprogs and fast_commit feature in ext4. One can track it here. Bottom line is, don't mess with filesystem features, when your power supply is unstable and you don't know how to fix it on your own.


0

I found a nice solution using systemd-networkd which should work for Ubuntu >=19.04: To automatically enable all can interfaces, create a file /etc/systemd/network/80-can.network with the following content: [Match] Name=can* [CAN] BitRate=500K Instead of "can*" you can also specify a specific interface (e.g. "can0"). And of course ...


0

I found a detailed explanation of this problem here: https://blog.le-vert.net/?p=24 Long story short: ... the proper fix is simply to boot your kernel with libata.noacpi=1


2

After all the problem was the Fast Boot of the bios: SecureBoot (Disabled) AND OS Mode Selection (CSM OS). Thank you all for helping me solving this mystery.


0

While you certainly can do all of this during the installation, it may be simpler if you did it in two steps: Install Ubuntu Wipe the storage device This would be the process: From the installation process, choose "Erase disk and install Ubuntu Then press [Continue]. Select the device where you would like to install the OS Then press [Install Now]....


2

I use a ThinkPad T14 with encrypted LUKS and GRUB with two boot options, Manjaro and Windows Boot Manager. To be able to update to Windows 11 I just had to enable SecureBoot (which led to booting directly into Windows), perform the update, and then deactivate SecureBoot again. No hassle, my GRUB worked right away again.


1

A solution tested from Ubuntu 20.04 and later is to use Ventoy. Directly from the tool description: Ventoy is an open source tool to create bootable USB drive for ISO/WIM/IMG/VHD(x)/EFI files. With ventoy, you don't need to format the disk over and over, you just need to copy the image files to the USB drive and boot it. You can copy many iso files at a ...


0

A solution tested from Ubuntu 20.04 and later is to use Ventoy. Directly from the tool description: Ventoy is an open source tool to create bootable USB drive for ISO/WIM/IMG/VHD(x)/EFI files. With ventoy, you don't need to format the disk over and over, you just need to copy the image files to the USB drive and boot it. You can copy many iso files at a ...


2

When you clone a disk, everything gets cloned, including the disk and partition UUIDs. That becomes a problem when both disks are connected to the system at the same time. You need to change the UUID on the original disk, or the clone disk. However, if you change the UUID on the original disk, you'll have to also edit /etc/fstab. If you change the UUID on ...


0

It simply means either the file /vmlinuz the system is looking for is either missing or has been modified. In my case, the file was not present at all. I just formatted the USB and made it bootable again and it worked.


0

I ran into this issue today, I have Linux installed alongside windows and I wanted to remove ubuntu and I directly deleted the partition from windows from disk management on windows 10 without actually deleting the grub menu. As a result whenever I rebooted the system I would see that black screen with that the grub terminal.This basicall happens when the ...


0

You still have the USB-stick/DVD that you used to install Ubuntu? Boot from this media. Than navigate to ' etc/default/grub and change DEFAULT=2 back into DEFAULT=0. That should get things back to function again. You can also use a USB-stick/DVD with e.g. AIO-SRT or Ikki-boot, but changing back the default-setting is imo the best solution.


0

I found a helpful solution from this tutorial. I install Windows 10 after installing Ubuntu 18. If the BIOS selects Windows to run first by default, restart your PC then access Boot options in your BIOS to select Ubuntu to run first. (Press F10 or F11 or F12 right after your PC boots, it depends on your PC manufacturer). After Ubuntu is booted successfully,...


5

I believe you need to change GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=2 to GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 You also need to run sudo update-grub after you make changes to the configuration file. You definitely do not need GRUB customizer. IMO GRUB customizer is a plague: most people would want boot to be as secure and stable as possible. Installing less stable, less secure, eyecandy to ...


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