New answers tagged

1

As @Terrance and @heynnema said in my questions comments it makes no difference if you use swap partition or swap file. It should act the same way. The only difference is that you have to configure it in a different way, see here.


0

I managed to access the tty console using Ctrl + Alt + Delete. After doing so, I executed the following command. sudo apt purge libglapi-mesa And it removed a lot of packages related to this library. Then I reinstalled sudo apt install libglapi-mesa Then I rebooted my PC and found out that I no longer have a desktop environment. But my WiFi is working anyway....


0

Here's the fool-proof step-by-step solution: Boot into safe mode (recovery mode). Enter this mode by holding the left shift key when the computer starts. in terminal, type: sudo apt-get purge nvidia* sudo ubuntu-drivers autoinstall #Make sure you have internet connection (This worked on my dual booted computer (Windows 10 and Ubuntu 18.04) my error ...


0

Full Install Ubuntu USB with Tails Persistent ISO Option There are various methods of making a Ubuntu Full install that boots in both BIOS and UEFI mode: How to Create a Full Install of Ubuntu 20.04 to USB Device Step by Step The simplest method is to flash a Full install image to the USB: How should I make my partitions for a Full Install USB? Once the Full ...


1

i have a boot fixer too... not (sorry i couldn't resist ;) Running the update-grub from live Stick ruined my boot entries. but let me boot into the installed system. (ubuntu 20.04) In my simple case I just had to run update-grub again from the installed and properly booted linux system. which would find the windows bootloader... and an 'grub-install' ...


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I suggest that you may have not written the complete ISO on your USB stick. The following commandline worked for me many times before: Be sure to have the drive unmounted! sudo dd bs=4M if=Your/path/to.iso of=/dev/sdX status=progress oflag=sync where sdX must be substituted. Note that oflag=sync ensures that dd returns AFTER all the data has been written on ...


1

This is not critical, the metadata seems to be only the last line number you were on, so the file will reopen in the same position. You can check with gio info <path>. Don't sudo gnome apps. Use "admin://" schema to tell gedit that it needs to escalate. You'll get a graphical escalate prompt. gedit admin:///etc/default/grub Good explanation ...


1

mkusb tool worked for me. this is how I installed it: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mkusb/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install mkusb mkusb-nox usb-pack-efi


-1

Type as slowly and as simply as possible, making sure you do not typo. Also, you may have forgotten your password. If so, retry with other passwords. If your PC can't boot normally, try reinstalling Ubuntu to use other recovery tools.


1

Perhaps an Ubuntu and GRUB reinstallation would fix your issue. Download them onto an SD or USB like normal, and reinstall the tools, making sure to save any data or settings you would like to keep. If this doesn't work, or you have perhaps already tried this, as a last resort only, delete the partitions Ubuntu is on and reinstall from scratch. If you ...


0

Acer BIOS/UEFI often has an extra menu only accessible if you set a supervisor password. Try these steps: They assume that you are installing Ubuntu, but might also be required for booting from a Live USB Make sure your UEFI is up to date. In UEFI, you must set a supervisor password. Once the supervisor password is set, some new menus are accessible. Enter ...


0

Ok, i figured it out: apparently my UEFI doesn't understand multiple EFI-Partitions on one Harddrive and defaulted to the one created by Windows, which, maybe because of an old ubuntu install, had grub on it. To anyone finding this question with a similar problem: make sure that the boot-images you are booting is actually the one you want it to be. Do so by ...


2

Thank you Guiverc! The trick is in your link, which says to ` press “any key” as soon as you see this symbol Once in safe graphics mode I can use this answer from Livipero Reposting in case someone else has the same issue and stumbles on this post. Boot live ISO, select safe graphics. Complete installation and shut down. On first boot, Hit "Esc" ...


2

Shutdown Ubuntu running a live session from the USB by clicking the ⏻ icon in the upper right corner of the desktop. From the ⏻ menu select Poweroff / Log Out -> Poweroff -> In the Poweroff window that pops up click Poweroff button. Shutting down the USB Ubuntu live session will also power off the computer. Then you can safely remove the Ubuntu live ...


0

it is a bit late (roughly a year), but I "found" the solution to the problem I had. So what would happen to the SSD was that it would just not be detected. It was nothing wrong with the GRUB installation, it was safe. And I was able to just boot into it by just trying again and again to reboot. I then got rid of Ubuntu eventually and just used ...


0

great question! When installing Ubuntu (or it's derivatives) alongside Windows 10, as long as you don't change the existing EFI partition, or create a new one, (UEFI systems only), or destroy the Windows 10 boot loader/partition, you should be fine. During install, Ubuntu looks for other supported operating systems, and their boot loaders. When Grub is ...


0

I've finally got it to work, as follows (full Ansible playbook at the end). I copy the original root partition to the new root partition, excluding some special mounts and (more significantly) the /boot directory contents, so I start from a clean slate: rsync -ahPHAXx --delete --exclude={/dev/*,/proc/*,/sys/*,/tmp/*,/run/*,/boot/*,/mnt/*,/media/*,/lost+found/...


0

Thanks guys! At the end, I tried without EFI system partition and it was all fine. I'm not sure why the installation setup showed that scaring message but finally such partition was not necessary.


2

I had a similar issue with my laptop which I solved by changing one BIOS setting. In BIOS System Configuration set Sata Operation to "AHCI".


0

I think I found the solution. Disable the gnome-initial-setup by commenting it out in /etc/xdg/autostart/gnome-initial-setup-first-login.desktop. The line to comment was: Exec=/usr/libexec/gnome-initial-setup --existing-user I recommend to check this issue


0

I tried all the ways I found on the internet - dd, installing from an repo or from .deb woeusb, the creation partitions by gparted with ntfs and copying the content of the windows-iso with ms-sys mbr etc. All these ways are not working for me. The only way that helped me was: Re-creation of a new fat32-partition (not ntfs!) on a flash drive with gparted. ...


0

Download "Grub Customizer" sudo apt install grub-customizer Open it and you can delete the unnecessary boot option from there.


0

When I faced this issue recently the bpool was missing from online status when run sudo zpool status so I do this First I import bpool like this sudo zpool import -d /dev/sdX bpool my previously bpool was in /dev/sdb6 So when run zpool status its says rpool and bpool are online, Then I reinstall last image like this to enforce to write on empty /boot In my ...


0

Given that specific USB devices are causing the long boot times and you want to keep them plugged in, you could try disabling automounting during boot. There are two ways you could do this: gnome-disk-utility and manually editing fstab. That second method is for the experienced users only. For a beginner, use the gnome-disk-utility Make sure the USB devices ...


0

I suggest you boot with a live cd, check if your nvme appears, and if it does, open your encrypted partition with do you have a second disk on which the boot partition is ? cryptsetup open <partition> crypt which will give you access to the partition via /dev/mapper/crypt. (you can replace crypt by the name you want) You can then mount the root ...


0

You should try boot-repair. Boot into a live USB-stick with ubuntu and go into the try Ubuntu option, then install boot-repair with: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair boot-repair the recommended repairs should be enough in most cases. If not take a look at the advanced options. Also ...


0

Thank you for getting involved. raspi-config indeed handles that in Raspberry Pi OS. Having to implement such a functionality myself, putting together a simple script using 'growpart' and 'resize2fs', managed by a systemd service, was sufficient to get the job done.


0

Partial answer... edits forthcoming... BIOS Asus PRIME X-470 Pro Your BIOS is current at 5603. /boot/initrd.img-5.4.0-51-generic This file may be corrupt. The best way to rebuild it is, boot to the -48 kernel and: sudo update-initramfs -c -k 5.4.0-51-generic Then reboot to the -51 kernel. memtest Ryzen processors are notorious for memory compatibility ...


-1

I was having boot time as 3-4 minutes because of this plymouth service taking 1 minute 30 seconds. What fixed my boot time was updating the kernel from 5.4(my default) to 5.9 in Ubuntu 20. update your kernel


-1

I had the same problem and it got fixed when I updated the kernel from 5.4 to 5.9 using Check and Update Ubuntu Kernel Version on Ubuntu 20.04 – Linux Hint


0

Try to suspend to RAM (close a lid or press Fn+F1). And check for /dev/sdX again.


0

You can see the terminal pressing CTRL + ALT + F1 (F1 to F6) normally. You may be able to access via SSH if you installed openssh. If this give you too much trouble get the micro SD, mount it with the laptop and modify the files you may need to restore. However if I were you, unless you enjoy investigating why it failed, I would just toast another micro SD ...


0

There are many problems in the video, if you are trying to dual boot Windows and Ubuntu. Please follow the steps here and here to set up your computer for a dual boot. (Don't worry if they refer to Ubuntu 17, it will work for Ubuntu 18.04 or 20.04), you just have to install the appropriate image on a USB drive. If you already have Ubuntu installed on a ...


0

I run SuperDuper to create a bootable clone on an external hard disk. Is it possible to do the same thing on Ubuntu? Although there is no tool out there like CCC (Bombich) or Super Duper for Mac OS, I think I have done it roughly, at least with EFI booting and a single user. Introduction (I write "disk" for any non volatile memory.) If you make a ...


1

You might be running into the issue where curtin reorders the UEFI boot order during the installation. It makes the current boot method the first in the boot order. There is an option to disable this. Including this snippet in the storage section of the user-data file will disable the UEFI reorder. storage: grub: reorder_uefi: False I've run ...


0

Right after boot, where the login screen shoud be, CTRL+ALT+F3 should take you to a console login... If you're able to do that, you can log in and you can permanently set it to boot directly to the console(tty) so you can work on it, sudo systemctl default-target multi-user.target. sudo init 5 or startx will temporarily take you back to the graphical desktop,...


0

I can't start ssh from grub. But strange enough if I use "nomodeset" instead of "quiet splash" I get a working operative system with desktop and everything. I think there is some issue in the x11 drivers for Ubuntu 20.


0

I was having the same problem on Mac, and I believe it was because of how I'd formatted my USB stick. Originally I had just created a partition as FAT and was able to load many different ISOs onto the device. Then I made a mistake and had to re-format(?) the whole device, which included re-making the file/partition table. Originally I just chose the default &...


0

Boot from live media, then do: $ sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt $ sudo mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev $ sudo mount --bind /dev/pts /mnt/dev/pts $ sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc $ sudo mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys $ sudo chroot /mnt $ grub-install /dev/sda $ grub-install --recheck /dev/sda $ update-grub $ exit && sudo umount /mnt/dev && sudo ...


0

Adriaan has the answer. I was using the open source X.Org X server. When I switched to the nvidia-driver-450-server driver, which was the only one available that was labeled proprietary and tested, the system came up fine and switched graphics modes during boot just the way it should Thank you for that.


4

Simple Hand Made Persistent USB If you like learning experiences, you can create a multi partition, persistent USB that can install Ubuntu, from scratch. Boot Installed Ubuntu or Live USB. Insert Target USB. Start GParted. Create a GPT partition table on Target USB. Create a 1MB BIOS boot partition on the left, formatted as unformatted. Add a 300MB FAT32 ...


0

My main-question ist wether its the fault of the ssd or maybe the fault of the os. Do i have to replace the ssd in that case? It's the SSD. The best course of action is to immediately backup your treasured stuff and decide what you are going to do about replacing the SSD.


0

It looks like I have to use mkinitrd command to make initrd and place it with the vmlinux in the UEFI system partition. (passing initrd argument to the kernel). But I look forward to hearing from someone who could elaborate on this more for year 2020.


0

The AE_NOT_FOUND error is relatively easy to fix and may be the cause of most of your problems so tackle that first. At the grub menu, select Edit, and where the text says quiet splash, change it to quiet splash pci=noaer That should allow you to boot. If that fixes the error, you will need to sudo nano /etc/default/grub and add the same option to the ...


0

Check if all to be mounted partitions specified by UUID in the /etc/fstab file do exist. I experienced that after new installations or updates the UUID can be modified on the disk but not in all configuration files. It's the reason for delay. Show UUIDs using blkid cmd and compare them with those listed in fstab. It could be necessary to use sudo blkid to ...


5

Another possible solution is to use Ventoy. Directly from the tool description: Ventoy is an open source tool to create bootable USB drive for ISO/WIM/IMG/VHD(x)/EFI files. With ventoy, you don't need to format the disk over and over, you just need to copy the image files to the USB drive and boot it. You can copy many iso files at a time and ventoy will ...


3

Partition the pendrive as you like, giving space for the ISO image in a FAT partition, the first one. Run lsblk to identify which device is your pendrive, i.e /dev/sdb, being the first partition the FAT one, i.e /dev/sdb1. Mount it, i.e /media/user/PENDRIVE Mark this partition as bootable, you can do this from Disks utility. Run these commands: WARNING! ...


3

Installing Windows 10 without USB using Ubuntu, Step by Step This step by step has been created from information provided by the OP, @Marcel Alexandru. Backup the Target drive. Create a 6GB NTFS partition on the hard drive and extract the Windows ISO to it. Create a 20GB, or larger, NTFS partition on the hard drive for the Windows Installation. Open ...


1

try this with https://www.balena.io/etcher/, let me know if it is working for you.


0

The middle of a release-update is the worst possible time to lose power. This is precisely why the release-upgrade tools advise you to plug in your system before proceeding. Sometimes it's recoverable. However, your description seems to indicate an incompatible, unbootable mix of old and new packages and incomplete configs. Advice: Wipe your system and ...


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