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This article has detailed steps for creating Ubuntu 18.04 Live USB and booting it: https://linuxconfig.org/install-ubuntu-from-usb-18-04-bionic-beaver The part you are stuck on now is getting BIOS to boot the Live USB: Access Boot Menu To access Boot Menu on your computer you will need to hit different keys (or combination of keys) depending on your ...


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Introduction to the problem The part responsible for the splash screen is called Plymouth. As reported by Wiki.ArchLinux: Plymouth is a project from Fedora and now listed among the freedesktop.org's official resources providing a flicker-free graphical boot process. It relies on kernel mode setting (KMS) to set the native resolution of the display as ...


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Although edwin's answer accurately describes how to free up space on /boot (563 up votes) it doesn't address the question of how to incorporate /boot into / to avoid micro-management of disk space. This question is a good example with gparted image: How to increase size of /boot partition using gparted Please help me here. I am always getting messages ...


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Have you changed your boot priority in the BIOS? I think you can find the settings you want by changing the priority in the BIOS.


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In grub press e, then add modprobe.blacklist=intel_lpss_pci in the Linux line after "---" and press f10. That will get you to the full os.. then upgrading to kernel 5.3 will fix the wifi. I read that there are other ways to fix the wifi, by copying the Intel drivers in /lib/firmware, but that did not work for me.. I haven't found a way to get the ...


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How did you install it? Did you go trough installation guide with gui? If yes, there is a chance you coincidentally switched to virtual console by using Ctrl+Alt+Fn. The GUI runs with X server and you can switch back to it by using Ctrl+Alt+F1 or Ctrl+Alt+F2.


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If you're using YUMI with USB memory stick there are certain Ubuntu versions which ISOs are not added correctly - for example, 16.04.5 LTS versions is added OK but version 16.04.6 LTS ISO image results in the "No DEFAULT or UI configuration directive found!" error


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Try the following: sudo apt install os-prober sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg reboot Edit your question with the output of lsblk if the above commands do not solve your issue.


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Please excuse this intrusion by an MS Windows user. I think you have a faulty Ubuntu kernel. This kernel, or the casper folder containing it needs to be in the root of an active partition, so a usb stick or a hard disk partition set as active. It won't run like Slax in a folder or in the root of another partition. I cover this in a website, on the details ...


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The way I see it the output you shared are the reasons for the delay in boot. You can switch off / uninstall (Bluetooth for example) or install the correct drivers. Try looking up for each error on Google. You can also disable the respective services like Bluetoothd. There is a lot of information regarding that on Google. But I too get a black screen ...


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Are you sure you didn't enable persistence in Rufus when you created your drive? Because if you did, and you aren't using Ubuntu 19.10, then you will get into busybox, due to a bug in Ubuntu 19.04 and earlier that prevents persistent partitions from being properly mounted. In other words, if you are using Ubuntu 18.04 or 19.04, and are using Rufus to ...


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At the terminal prompt, you can start your Desktop Environment with the command startxEnter. Copy off everything you want to save to get it off the drive. As to the LiveUSB you used to install Ubuntu, I would suggest recreating it after copying off all the files you need to preserve on that USB. Redownload the version of Ubuntu you wish to use from https:...


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I am on a system with an nVidia card as well. I am not sure your problem is the same as mine, but in order for me to be able to boot, I had to add nomodeset to the kernel line in the GRUB menu entry. When the GRUB boot menu is shown, press e to edit the menu entry. Go to the line that starts with linux & add nomodeset to the list of options then press ...


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Putting nvme_load=YES boot parameter to GRUB is irrelevant because your M.2 SSD is SATA-III, not NVMe. You don't need any drivers for a SATA M.2 drive, they're already in your kernel. You attached it into your system correctly, as per the photos. Instead, use gparted to prepare the drive so it holds an ext4 partition, and then move your /home partition ...


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I don't think I can help you with your second question, but I may be able to help you with the first question. It's unfortunately not automatic, but you can hit alt+PrtSc, then while holding those two, type in this order R E I S U B (Busier backwards). This will force Ubuntu to reboot (safely). Hope this helped, sanserfio


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I managed to find a different solution, which doesn´t require me to run Windows Server nor an additional network setup holding a iSCSI-target/initiator. I realized that I can simply run a virtual machine from the ubuntu-client with the requested software and applications needed. In addition letting the virtual machine be on the same network, via the bridged ...


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I finally solved the issue myself. When Windows does the Oct 2019 update it changes the block ID of the Windows partition!! So the Windows block ID in /etc/fstab must be updated!! SOLUTION: From linux command line type 'blkid' and note the block ID for the Windows partition Edit /etc/fstab and replace the old Windows block ID with the new block ID reboot


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This happened to me too, and it took me a bit of time to realize it was due to a bad entry in my /etc/fstab... I was setting up multiple OSes on different partitions, and at some point one of the partitions' UUID changed, so when I booted a previously working OS, it failed because it didn't find the UUID defined in /etc/fstab. To fix it I simply commented ...


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I uninstalled Nvidia drivers with apt-get remove --purge nvidia-* and then apt autoremove and it boots as expected now.


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Very strange issue. I needed to add: nameserver 8.8.8.8 to /etc/resolv.conf after running: sudo dpkg-reconfigure resolvconf and restarting the network manager with: service network-manager restart Not sure if I fixed it accidentally another way, but this is what fixed this very specific and strange issue. I still can't get to the login screen but that is a ...


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1) I... de-allocated all space for Windows... (t)hen...I restarted the computer and now it does not load anything at all, except for a black screen with a blinking cursor. You didn't complete the installation, so there's no boot manager, no GRUB, no operating system. Time to start over by making a Live USB; that links to Windows and Ubuntu instructions to ...


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I had the same issue still appears when I tried to install ubuntu 18.04 LTS on my HP laptop. I don't have dual boot. Previous on SSD I had Windows 7 OS. I've spent hours of trying several options: connect/disconnect internet connection while installing, install 3rd/don't install 3rd parties, boot in secure mode/ don't boot in secure boot. During installation ...


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From my experience, I think that this problem is caused by upgrading to a newer kernel version. Force shutdown and then power on again. Select the Advance option for Ubuntu or Elementary. In the next tab, just choose a previous kernel version and hit Enter and it will go to desktop normally.


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UEFI capability does not necessarily imply secure boot capability. Your machine has UEFI capability, but not secure boot. It will boot either legacy or UEFI, but when both are possible, your priority is to boot the EFI first. No secure boot capability means it cannot be enabled, so consider it disabled.


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You can install GParted using sudo apt install gparted. Then, launch it using sudo gparted. Make sure that your disk is selected, then resize the windows partition to the size that you want. Then move to the unallocated space and press format to ext4 filesystem. After that, return to the ubuntu installer and do the necessary steps. When you reach the install ...


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If you can boot and access the login screen you could try reinstalling ubuntu desktop and reconfigure gdm3 or lightdm depending on which you are. While on your login screen, get into a tty (CTRL+ALT+2 or CTRL+ALT+3) Then on this terminal, login as root and do the following: $ apt install --reinstall ubuntu-desktop $ dpkg-reconfigure gdm3 #or $ dpkg-...


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The latest HWE kernel actually fixed this.


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I was having the same problem and I too was not satisfied by the fsck and the nomodeset solution found on the internet. Then, I have definitely solved it. After days searching for the problem, I have found out that it was not in Ubuntu itself, but was in GDM (GNOME Display Manager-gdm3 package) that, for some reason still unknown to me, was entering into an ...


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You've got a number of things to check... Make sure that your AMD Ryzen 2700x isn't one of the recalled CPUs. See https://www.extremetech.com/computing/254750-amd-replaces-ryzen-cpus-users-affected-rare-linux-bug for a start... (this may not apply to your CPU). Update your BIOS to F42d. See https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Motherboard/X470-AORUS-ULTRA-GAMING-rev-...


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Rufus is able to create persistent live drives that work in both UEFI (MBR or GPT) and BIOS mode, with casper-rw being used for the persistent storage partition, so it can have a size of more than 4GB. Ubuntu Live ISOs created after August 1, 2019 support the persistent storage feature, so persistent partitions are only working with Rufus 3.7 and later using ...


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This solved it for me https://devtalk.nvidia.com/default/topic/1064250/linux/newly-installed-drivers-are-not-found-when-nvidia-smi-is-called-/post/5389549/?offset=7#5389568 I had to uninstall the NVIDIA driver, then I was able to disable secure boot, then I reinstalled the NVIDIA driver.


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Thanks to @guiverc you fix the partition where your Ubuntu OS (The GUI) is using the Fsck command or the Gparted application provided by Ubuntu or other favors if they have the app. Gparted uses an advance version of fsck called e2fsck which is a command-line app all on it's own. You have to use a live disc (preferably the live disk you used to install your ...


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A WiFi connection is a common issue that can be either a software or a hardware issue. In Ubuntu, the NetworkManager makes the connection to wifi without you having to perform any manual task. At times however unexpected things might occur and you will have to configure or adjust the connection settings by yourself. You first need to make sure that the ...


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Incase you can't find anything helpful: Install Linux on Virtual Machine. OR Enable Windows Subsystem For Linux(WSL). Then Download the Distribution you like from Microsoft Store.


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sudo dpkg -P grub-legacy-ec2 To get rid of possible remains files. It would be better from me to ask over dpkg. If errorrs pop up, but only when sudo mv /etc/kernel/postinst.d/x-grub-legacy-ec2 /etc/kernel/postinst.d/x-grub-legacy-ec2 $HOME The same please for /boot/grub/default and for /boot/grub/menu.lst then dry to remove the old kernel sudo ...


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It is simple: just enable TPM from the BIOS setup. To change the BIOS settings you can hit F2 during boot before Ubuntu starts. Please be sure not to change anything else if your computer is working properly.


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Chances are there is a "stop job" running in the background or an input inhibitor activated. You should wait 2 minutes for them to end normally before forcing an abend (abnormal ending) with a hard reboot (holding the power key down for 10 seconds). If this problem happens frequently to you, try closing all your open applications before you reboot.


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It is possible to convert a VirtualBox VDI disk to an image file which can then be put onto a disk partition. There may be further steps required to make this bootable, though it may just work. To convert the VDI file: vboxmanage clonehd YourVMDisk.vdi RawVMDisk.img --output=raw This will result in a .img file which can be written to a block device ...


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Press the Power button and press F10 key repeatedly to enter teh BIOS setup menu. (depending on different manufacturer, instead of F10, it's maybe ESC, F1, F2, F8...) 2) On the BIOS Setup screen, press F9 to select and load the BIOS Setup Default settings. 3) Press F10 to Save and Exit. 4) Use the arrow keys to select Yes, then press Enter when asked Exit ...


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I just created a 19.04 Lubuntu virtual machine. Based on its fstab it looks like you need a single line like this: UUID=1124c007-a2cd-4e2b-8942-06fca94f5f88 / ext4 defaults 0 1 Don't include that device info /dev/sda1


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Change in /etc/fstab/ UUID=41aed6f4-8336-48ef-95d0-9911d81e9f75 /mnt/vault ext4 defaults,nofail 0 2 to UUID=41aed6f4-8336-48ef-95d0-9911d81e9f75 /mnt/vault ext4 user,noauto,nofail 0 0 Option defaults means rw, suid, dev, exec, auto, nouser and async


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A user from another forum suggested me, to use the boot flag pci=nommconf. This has worked great so far.


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But in this, I need to turn the ACPI off. I don't want to do that. Why not? Since it's very important for a laptop, right? Not really. "important" is a matter of opinion as it depends on what features you want to use on your notebook. You can use a notebook without ACPI. Mind that the problem is a HARDWARE bug and the boot process nor the installer ...


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Secure Boot with third party drivers checked/enabled during Install requires registering new MOK into UEFI at reboot. Ubuntu installer does this by registering some Mok* EFI variables before it has actually finished creating the EFI System Partition for your new Ubuntu installation. If the Installer is interrupted before it is finished, we need to remove ...


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This solution is aimed at enabling you to log-in to your system. You will need to investigate the cause for this later. It is, however, much better to do from a functional system rather than a system which does not boot correctly. Please follow the steps below: Reboot your machine and hold the Shift key as soon as you pass the BIOS logo to access the GRUB ...


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I got it done by using: e2fsck -fy /dev/sda1


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Your gaming performance in Windows won't suffer if you install Ubuntu alongside Windows. There is no decrease in performance in either OS in a dual boot because both Ubuntu and Windows operating systems in a dual boot use all the available RAM. If you install an Ubuntu guest OS in a virtual machine it will reduce performance in Windows only when the Ubuntu ...


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Short answer, you can't boot a legacy Windows from UEFI grub. Once grub boots, the boot mode has been set to UEFI, and your Windows is in legacy mode, so cannot boot. You can select the device Windows is on (presumably with its own boot loaders), and boot that from the EFI boot menu (some function key at power-up to allow you to select boot device/OS). You ...


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According to the Official Ubuntu Documentation (which is searchable): Tap the Super (AKA Windows) key and open Startup Applications OR press Alt+F2 and run the command gnome-session-properties . Click Add and enter the command to be executed at login (name and comment are optional). For example, to make Firefox start automatically, it's sufficient to type ...


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The issue is so common. Just use the command below in you Command Line. sudo update-grub2


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