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How to restart the whole gvfs "subsystem", when I've e.g. killed a frozen gvfs-sftp process and want to use it again?

GVFS is the subsystem that takes care about mounting/unmounting drives when you click them in Nautilus, including network drives.

The problem is that sometimes the transfer freezes and I need to kill the frozen "provider" (e.g. the gvfs-sftp). But then I can no longer connect to any network drives in Nautilus using SFTP. Restarting the whole computer helps, but there probably is a better way.

I searched the whole /etc in my computer to find out how is this gvfs system started, but I didn't succeed.

  • This is a note to myself, because I keep forgetting (and needing) it occasionally. – Martin Pecka Jan 17 '18 at 11:40
  • AskUbuntu is not supposed to be a memo storage! This is a community for asking and helping on questions about Ubuntu. If you just want to save code snippets for yourself use another page like Gist's on GitHub.com. Or elaborate your question and answer well so other users can take advantage of it. – derHugo Jan 17 '18 at 15:44
  • @derHugo Then why is there the possibility to answer your own question? I thought it is exactly for this kind of things - you start solving an issue, find the answer, and think somebody else could also be interested. That's my case here. – Martin Pecka Jan 17 '18 at 16:30
  • This is true if your posts are elaborated well so another user can easily find your question and understand how your solution solves the issue. – derHugo Jan 17 '18 at 16:38
  • @derHugo Ok, I've made both the question and the answer more verbose. – Martin Pecka Jan 18 '18 at 14:19
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It shows that gvfs is automatically started with the first Nautilus instance (I still don't know how, but it does).

So to restart gvfs, just kill all the remaining process (killing the "master" gvfsd daemon is enough), make sure all instances of nautilus are closed, and then open a new one.

killall gvfsd
nautilus -q  # Close all Nautilus windows/instances
nautilus
  • Did not work for me just now. The mount point remains unattached: $ ls /run/user/1000/gvfs ls: cannot access /run/user/1000/gvfs: Transport endpoint is not connected – Tomislav Nakic-Alfirevic Jun 6 at 22:33

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