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I am trying to update my system (Ununtu 14.04) but Ubuntu tells me that I have not enough space on file system root (although it is 20GB). I searched for it and tried many suggestion including autoremove, autoclea, etc. For all of above system brings an error - unmet dependencies. Another search and -f install, dist-upgrade, purge remove unattended-upgrades, remove generic... and many more, all are unsuccessful.

I am either unable to update, install or uninstall because of low root space or unmet dependencies. Typical error message looks like this...

Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done You might want to run 'apt-get -f install' to correct these: The following packages have unmet dependencies. linux-headers-generic : Depends: linux-headers-3.13.0-139-generic but it is not going to be installed linux-image-generic : Depends: linux-image-extra-3.13.0-139-generic but it is not going to be installed linux-signed-image-3.13.0-139-generic : Depends: linux-image-extra-3.13.0-139-generic (= 3.13.0-139.188) but it is not going to be installed E: Unmet dependencies. Try 'apt-get -f install' with no packages (or specify a solution).

or

The following packages have unmet dependencies. linux-signed-generic : Depends: linux-headers-generic (= 3.13.0.139.148) but it is not installable linux-signed-image-3.13.0-139-generic : Depends: linux-image-extra-3.13.0-139-generic (= 3.13.0-139.188) but it is not installable E: Unmet dependencies. Try using -f.

Hours of searching brought me here, sorry and please help.

Just for reference;

df -Th

-gives

Filesystem Type Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on

udev devtmpfs 3.9G 4.0K 3.9G 1% /dev

tmpfs tmpfs 792M 1.2M 791M 1% /run

/dev/sda6 ext4 19G 17G 716M 96% /

none tmpfs 4.0K 0 4.0K 0% /sys/fs/cgroup

none tmpfs 5.0M 0 5.0M 0% /run/lock

none tmpfs 3.9G 16M 3.9G 1% /run/shm

none tmpfs 100M 44K 100M 1% /run/user

/dev/sda8 ext4 657G 7.8G 616G 2% /home

/dev/sda2 vfat 256M 116M 141M 46% /boot/efi

-

sudo du -hs /*

-gives

9.9M /bin

1.4G /boot

4.0K /cdrom

4.0K /dev

23M /etc

7.7G /home

0 /initrd.img

0 /initrd.img.old

6.8G /lib

3.5M /lib32

4.0K /lib64

16K /lost+found

8.0K /media

4.0K /mnt

du: cannot access ‘/proc/4560/task/4560/fd/4’: No such file or directory

du: cannot access ‘/proc/4560/task/4560/fdinfo/4’: No such file or directory

du: cannot access ‘/proc/4560/fd/4’: No such file or directory

du: cannot access ‘/proc/4560/fdinfo/4’: No such file or directory

0 /proc

76K /root

du: cannot access ‘/run/user/1000/gvfs’: Permission denied

1.3M /run

12M /sbin

4.0K /srv

0 /sys

44K /tmp

8.0G /usr

682M /var

0 /vmlinuz

0 /vmlinuz.old

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Since / is 96% full, you need to look at why the numbers of the folders on / don't add up to the 17G claimed to be in use. One thing I have seen in the past is that when a partition is not mounted (e.g. /home) AND you write anything to the folder /home, it gets written to the partition where the parent is (/) Then when you mount the partition, the files that were in the folder take up space but are not seen.

So if /dev/sda8 was not mounted at some point in time and you copied files into /home, they now occupy space in the root partition. Then when /dev/sda8 is mounted to /home, all those files are invisible. Since /home is the only directory on your system that is a separate partition mounted under root, you might try booting a Live-CD system, making sure that /dev/sda8 is not mounted and then see if you have any file/directories in the /dev/sda6 paritition's directory which will not be he / directory to the Live-CD system but will be /media/[unique id] and be your regular system's root directory. In that directory will be a directory "home". It should have nothing in it as "home" is a separate partition.

At that point you might also do an fsck of that partition to see if it is consistent.

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