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OS: Ubuntu 17.10 x86_64 Host: Inspiron 7558 A07 (Dell Inspiron 15 7000 Series laptop) DE: GNOME WM: GNOME Shell

My current setup has the touchpad setting "Tap To Click" which applies to both one-finger and two-finger taps for left and right click respectively. However I want the tap to click to apply only to two-finger taps and not one-finger taps. I tried using the GNOME extension "Extended gestures" but this doesn't have the setting I am looking for. I also tried using touchegg and libinput but I was unable to figure out how to configure it to make it work how I wanted, I'm fairly new to this. If anyone knows how to do this I'd appreciate the help!

Also, from the "Extended gestures" extension I have the three-finger horizontal swipe set to cycle applications (similar to Alt+Tab). I'm wondering if there's a way to make this feature behave more like the Alt+Tab action in the sense that it should display the app switcher onscreen. Instead it just switches to the most recently used window without giving you the option to swipe through the open windows, if that makes sense.

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You can do this using synaptics. It should be installed by default as your touchpad is working.

To disable Tap to Click for one finger tap, launch the terminal and run the following command:

synclient TapButton1=0

To get back to the default value, you can run

synclient TapButton1=1

This setting does not persist across logins and reboots. So you can auto-run this command every time you login.

Refer this answer on how to do the automatic running of the command.

  • Has this worked for you? – Yaksha Nov 3 '17 at 14:23
  • synclient no longer works because the synaptics driver is no longer used. libinput is now used for touch input. – HankB Feb 17 '18 at 1:32
  • See this bug report for how to run Synaptics under Ubuntu 17.10. – WinEunuuchs2Unix Feb 18 '18 at 18:56

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