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I used to dual-boot Windows and Ubuntu on my previous laptop and everything worked just fine. I got a new 500gb HP Laptop and after installing Ubuntu, I realized that about 100gb was missing. Ubuntu is allocated to 114gb and Windows is allocated to 256gb. I have no idea where the other space went to and I want to know if it can be recovered.

  • I suggest installing gparted (sudo apt-get install gparted), where you can check your drives and see where are those missing Gb's. Have you tried? – chazecka Sep 19 '17 at 19:50
  • I haven't, and I don't know how to use it. Can you please guide me through? – Gozie Sep 19 '17 at 19:51
  • ok Ill post and answer for you – chazecka Sep 19 '17 at 19:52
  • You're (Probably) missing NOTHING. A typical factory installed Windows 10 includes a recovery partition and a typical automated Ubuntu installation creates a swap partition. If there are just a few MB of unallocated space at the beginning or at the end of the drive, leave it alone. That's for better alignment only. – user692175 Sep 19 '17 at 21:16
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Use Gparted, you can install it by typing

sudo apt-get install gparted

It has got a GUI so it is pretty easy to use, it is a package to display all your mounted drives with their partitions and sizes included.

gparted

https://gparted.org/

Here is the official website with help, for your information it would be enough to install it and check the differences, if you would like to manage your partitions however, you will have to mount it live and do it from your live medium (flash disk e.g.).

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  • Thank you, I've seen the unallocated space. How do I recover it? – Gozie Sep 19 '17 at 19:59
  • It is the last sentence of the help - if you would like to manage your partitions however, you will have to mount it live and do it from your live medium (flash disk e.g.). You can check youtube for video tutorials of: How to extend volumes (like here youtube.com/watch?v=cDgUwWkvuIY&t=334s ) or you can create a new question thread (in case you are unable to find existing one). – chazecka Sep 19 '17 at 20:03

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