4

I am currently awaiting the final parts for a home theater PC build I am doing, and want to use Ubuntu (this will be my first attempt at anything outside of a Windows machine). My plan is to use a standard Ubuntu version, as up to date as possible while using VLC as my main media player.

There seems to be a difference in version from what VLC supports (their website says 13.10 is the latest they support here: https://www.videolan.org/vlc/download-ubuntu.html) but the latest version of Ubuntu, is 17.xx. Main use will be playing downloaded content through VLC.

The meat of my question is, am I going to run into significant problems attempting to install VLC on a newer than "recommended" version of Ubuntu and if so, would it be better for me to install an older version (13.10) until VLC supports a newer Ubuntu release?

6
  • 2
    don't install 13.10 if connected to web. it's not a LTS (long term support) version; and had only 9 months of support (released is 2013 october). the supports the VLC website refers to is they've checked only that version & know the libs used exist there. I use & love VLC, and use it fine with Ubuntu 16.04LTS (2016 april release) & didn't go to VLC website; but loaded it from standard Ubuntu repositories; which is what I'd recommend for users anyway. vlc website is probably out-of-date
    – guiverc
    Sep 9, 2017 at 2:38
  • @guiverc That sounds like a comment which just duplicates my answer below?
    – Thomas Ward
    Sep 9, 2017 at 2:55
  • 2
    @ThomasWard Both don't explicitly state the OP's real problem - they don't know how to properly install programs on Ubuntu. Looks like the comment was 82 seconds after your answer was posted, I'd wager both were being typed at the same time, without knowing of the other's existence.
    – Xen2050
    Sep 9, 2017 at 3:30
  • @ThomasWard there were no answers when I started typing; and your answer didn't appear until after I'd posted my comment anyway fyi. I had no idea you were typing as I was; you were just quicker.
    – guiverc
    Sep 9, 2017 at 3:33
  • @Xen2050 I beg to differ. The OP is asking if they need to go back to 13.10 to support VLC. The "recommended" version of Ubuntu VLC supports is so far beyond support it can't even be reliably supported by later versions of software and libraries. They aren't going to have any problems either.
    – Thomas Ward
    Sep 9, 2017 at 13:31

2 Answers 2

12

Firstly, 13.10 is infinitely dead. It is well past end of life and not supported. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES ATTEMPT TO DOWNGRADE TO IT.

VLC 100% most definitely is supported in later Ubuntu releases, and I know that I use it as my primary media player on my Ubuntu laptop.

Further evidence that VLC exists and works in the repositories is evidenced by the fact that VLC exists in every version since 12.04, as shown by this rmadison output:

 vlc | 2.0.1-4                | precise/universe          | source, amd64, armel, armhf, i386, powerpc
 vlc | 2.0.8-0ubuntu0.12.04.1 | precise-security/universe | source, amd64, armel, armhf, i386, powerpc
 vlc | 2.0.8-0ubuntu0.12.04.1 | precise-updates/universe  | source, amd64, armel, armhf, i386, powerpc
 vlc | 2.1.2-2build2          | trusty/universe           | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, powerpc, ppc64el
 vlc | 2.1.6-0ubuntu14.04.4   | trusty-security/universe  | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, powerpc, ppc64el
 vlc | 2.1.6-0ubuntu14.04.4   | trusty-updates/universe   | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, powerpc, ppc64el
 vlc | 2.2.0-1                | vivid/universe            | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, powerpc, ppc64el
 vlc | 2.2.2-5                | xenial/universe           | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, powerpc, ppc64el, s390x
 vlc | 2.2.2-5ubuntu0.16.04.4 | xenial-security/universe  | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, powerpc, ppc64el, s390x
 vlc | 2.2.2-5ubuntu0.16.04.4 | xenial-updates/universe   | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, powerpc, ppc64el, s390x
 vlc | 2.2.4-14ubuntu2        | zesty/universe            | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, ppc64el, s390x
 vlc | 2.2.4-14ubuntu2.2      | zesty-security/universe   | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, ppc64el, s390x
 vlc | 2.2.4-14ubuntu2.2      | zesty-updates/universe    | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, ppc64el, s390x
 vlc | 2.2.6-4build1          | artful/universe           | source, amd64, arm64, armhf, i386, ppc64el, s390x

So feel free to just install vlc from the repositories and use it. There won't be any issues with compatibility.

I've emailed the VideoLAN group about the inaccuracy of their site in the interim.

3
  • 1
    +1 for not only pointing out the site is wrong but attempting to fix the wrong at the same time.
    – Mast
    Sep 9, 2017 at 8:27
  • Question is whether you need a "supported" version in practice for a home theater PC IF that home theater PC is not used to stream pirated content, and behind either a firewall or a device effectively working as one (NAT router with no port forwards and no UPNP). Moot point though given the desired application IS supported. Sep 9, 2017 at 9:23
  • @rackandboneman Given that the above is directly from the Debian repos and Debian has a whole VLC team to keep it up to date, my guess is "supported" is the 'latest' release but their site is horribly inaccurate. Case in point above.
    – Thomas Ward
    Sep 9, 2017 at 13:30
1

You can install VLC into all current Ubuntu versions (and all current Ubuntu community flavours, Kubuntu, Lubuntu ... Xubuntu) with the following command lines in a terminal window.

  • Update the list of current versions of the program packages in the repositories

    sudo apt update
    
  • This step is not necessary but I use the following command to keep my installed Ubuntu desktop systems up to date and with full compatibility between the program packages and it reduces the risk, that there will be problems when installing a new program package. But this step might be risky in a server, where you want very long running time without rebooting:

    Upgrade all currently installed program packages (only in installed systems, not in persistent live systems)

    sudo apt full-upgrade
    
  • Install VLC

    sudo apt install vlc
    
5
  • why the full-upgrade? it's time consuming, could have unwanted/unexpected side effects, and not required to get a vlc install. and is unrelated to the question.
    – user371366
    Sep 9, 2017 at 5:20
  • My experience is that in the long run full-upgrade is best at keeping the system's all components up to date and compatible. This way I manage to keep my LTS system running for years without problems. An alternative is to use sudo apt-get dist-upgrade, which I think is doing something very similar (but using the older but still available program apt-get).
    – sudodus
    Sep 9, 2017 at 5:28
  • 1
    I use arch on all my desktop systems, which is a rolling release distro that explicitly does not support partial upgrades, in which your advice of doing a full upgrade before installing anything is actaully very important. however, I have seen and worked on debian and ubuntu servers with auto-security-updates only, where single packages were upgraded on an as-needed basis (not my preferred style, but it made sense in context). That's the benefit of something like ubuntu over a rolling-release distro; the maintainers put a lot of work into maintaining compatibility between system compoments.
    – user371366
    Sep 9, 2017 at 7:55
  • 1
    so it's not necessary at (least in theory). more to the point though; it seems like it promotes a specific (not particularly bad or anything) way of maintaining a system (regular full-upgrades), when the question was primarily about how to install VLC.
    – user371366
    Sep 9, 2017 at 7:57
  • @dn3s, I can agree about that. I will modify my answer.
    – sudodus
    Sep 9, 2017 at 8:14

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .