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I am using Ubuntu 16.04. Ubuntu ships with some gnome-screenshot, which can take screenshots of both the entire screen and screen parts. Unfortunately, it doesn't work if some menu is activated, i.e. I can't take a screenshot of a dropdown menu. In other cases the menu is closed when I press Shift+PrtScn.

This is an imperfection which Greenshot does not have.

Is there a normal screenshot application in Ubuntu which can capture everything, including menus?

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    Just pressing print screen by itself should do the trick.... – Android Dev Aug 17 '17 at 14:52
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    It will shot entire screen – Dims Aug 17 '17 at 14:53
  • And then you just crop it in GIMP – Android Dev Aug 17 '17 at 14:57
  • @AndroidDev very pure automation – Dims Aug 17 '17 at 15:55
  • greenshot is only for Windows. I'm not sure there's any Linux equivalent. – DK Bose Aug 17 '17 at 16:08
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I suggest you to use Shutter. It works with any flavor of Ubuntu.

You can install it with apt or apt-get in all currently supported versions of Ubuntu:

sudo apt install shutter

If you prefer, you can set it as default PrtScr shortcut app in Ubuntu/Unity and in Lubuntu

To make capturing a windows dropdown menu easier give yourself 3 seconds of additional time to show the windows dropdown menu after selecting the window that gets a screenshot of it taken. Select Edit -> Preferences -> in left pane select Main -> in the number picker after where it says Capture after a delay of select 3 seconds.

  • Shutter uses delay, which is not comfortable. Are there any programs which can just shot what I want, without any tricks? – Dims Aug 17 '17 at 15:54
  • Shutter doesn't use any delay by default. By default the delay in Shutter is 0 seconds if you don't change it in the number picker. I prefer to use a delay because it gives me extra time to move the mouse. – karel Aug 17 '17 at 15:56
  • Without delay it can't shot menu (selected region) – Dims Aug 17 '17 at 15:59
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If you don't want to install a GUI program, you can just use scrot (sudo apt install scrot). To make a screenshot of the whole screen after five seconds (-d 5) and save it to ~/screenshot.png execute in a terminal:

scrot -d 5 ~/screenshot.png

To make the screenshot of the (to that time) active window (-u) including its border (-b) after five seconds and save it to ~/screenshot.png execute:

scrot -u -b -d 5 ~/screenshot.png

Read more on scrot's manpage.

  • It is expected, that user first runs scrot with delay, then call menu within this delay. People just didn't work with greenshot and think these tricks are unavoidable. – Dims Aug 17 '17 at 15:57
  • @Dims Setting the delay is not a “trick”, but rather a feature –image a situation where you need keystrokes at the time of the screenshot! However if you can't resign from using your favorite windows program, just use it with wine. – dessert Aug 17 '17 at 18:21
  • @Dim The advantage of linux OSes is clearly that you can set things like you want them to be – if you want to have a key on your keyboard that does e.g. scrot -u -b ~/screenshot.png, just configure it that way! – dessert Aug 17 '17 at 18:49
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I know it's been quite a long time, but in case you didn't solve it, I had the same problem and I found the solution in the pre-installed software in Ubuntu, notably the "Screenshot" app (it should be under "Activities", or "Accessories").

This will let you print a desired region of the screen. You'll need to see or set the triggering actions under the "Keyboard" system section, "Shortcut" tab (I had the Shift-PrnScreen on default). There are also a number of other options.

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I know i'm late for this but I thought may be it will help another person who will face this kind of problem so for this purpose use built-in app named "SCREENSHOT". I'm using UBUNTU BUDGIE 18.04 LTS 64-bit, and this application will also be present in UBUNTU 18.04. Hope so it will help you.

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