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By mistake I executed this command on Ubuntu 16.04

sudo chmod -R -x * && sudo chmod -R +X *

Now all the folder converted into files, which is not opening.

How can I fix it?

  • in which folder did you execute the command? – Yaron Aug 10 '17 at 8:17
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    In addition to that ^, the second chmod probably never ran, since chmod would show an error because it couldn't descend into any directories on which it had already set -x. – muru Aug 10 '17 at 8:21
  • @Yaron at root of my login – Pallavi Aug 10 '17 at 8:28
  • See the link(ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2237478) for same case, but my systems Documents sub-folders get converted. – Pallavi Aug 10 '17 at 8:30
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    @Zanna adds execute to directories and keeps it for files which already have it, iirc – muru Aug 10 '17 at 10:59
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You have removed execution-rights (and thereby access to) all directories and eventually files that where executable.

Start by giving back exec to directories:

find . -type d -exec chmod +x {} \;

If you had any executable programs, then for each of these do:

chmod +x filename

The +xin the commands above gives execute rights to all (user, group and others - the three different access levels in a linux/posix filesystem)). If you for some reason needs to restrict access to only user or user+group you can replace +x with u+x or ug+x to achieve this.

  • what do you mean "eventually"? Shouldn't OP start by giving x only to u? – Zanna Aug 10 '17 at 11:09
  • @Zanna, you are right .. I will change the text. – Soren A Aug 10 '17 at 11:12
  • Perhaps you could investigate which directories should not have x for u - I attempted it in my answer here Home files and folders permissions could not be determined – Zanna Aug 10 '17 at 11:21
  • @Zanna .. I think that it is more relevant to identify directories that should ONLY have x for u .. but besides that, you are right. – Soren A Aug 10 '17 at 11:29

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