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I am running a primarily Ubuntu 16.04LTS shop. This question is in reference to instant messenger services, not IM clients. My question is for my environment primarily, which is 100% Ubuntu. What I'm asking about is what application professional developers and engineers use to collaborate on multi-continent projects that are being worked on globally.

Now that the major IM services (YIM, MS Messenger, Google Talk and so on) are gone I'm wondering what instant messenger Engineers are using to collaborate on. Seems like the last two are Skype and AIM. And each has it's own negatives.

I looked into Cryptocat and I did try it out. However it has some MAJOR bugs in it and the project seems to have been abandoned. I've e-mailed the developer several times and have gotten no response.

I do like the design model of Cryptocat. Encrypted, fairly anonymous and hack-proof conversations. Works cross platform. *NIX, Microsoft, smartphones and so on.

For general chit-chat I've been using IRC for decades. Obviously not a tool for private project development discussions.

Anyone using a free, secure instant messenger service that they like?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Byte Commander, DK Bose, muru, David Foerster, Ravexina Aug 3 '17 at 6:55

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Your question is for Software Recommendations – user692175 Aug 2 '17 at 23:13
  • Most kids nowadays use Discord. – EODCraft Staff Aug 2 '17 at 23:24
  • I don't happen to be a member of that forum. My question is for my environment primarily, which is 100% Ubuntu. And since my Grandchildren are mostly no longer kids, I'm not reallying looking for that type of tool. What I'm asking about is what professional developers and engineers use to collaborate on multi-continent projects that are being worked on globally. – jones0610 Aug 2 '17 at 23:34
  • Most Ubuntu devs use Google Hangouts, it work from anywhere, any browser, any OS. – user692175 Aug 3 '17 at 0:53
  • @jones0610 Close votes aren't flags, and the community is entitled to make close votes. (Flagging for us to 'stop the flagging' is just creating noise, so please don't do that.) – Thomas Ward Aug 3 '17 at 0:54
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Slack is a free, cross-platform team collaboration tool. Slack's features include real-time messaging, archiving, search, channels for team conversations, private groups, and file sharing. Slack has a web application accessible from a browser and a local application for Ubuntu 64-bit. The local Slack application allows you to sign in to multiple teams, get desktop notifications, and launch right from the panel.

To install slack in all currently supported versions of Ubuntu open the terminal and type:

sudo apt install snapd   
sudo snap install slack --classic

Slack has a free version for small teams, or anyone who wants to try Slack for an unlimited period of time.

Slack security features include data encryption in transit and at rest. Slack YouTube channel.

  • @jones0610 It may interest you to know, although not necessarily relevant to Ubuntu, that Software Recommendations Q&A supports answers about both local applications installed on the hard drive and web applications. In this case since Slack provides both types of apps, it is on topic to post about it here. In case this question gets closed, which it might, you can still post it at Software Recommendations Q&A where I am also a user and I will repost my answer there. – karel Aug 3 '17 at 5:32
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    Mattermost is meant to be an open-source competitor to Slack. Not sure how competitive it is. – muru Aug 3 '17 at 5:40
  • I already prefer Mattermost but +1 for the Slack suggestion. Learned something new today :) – user692175 Aug 3 '17 at 7:03

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