5

I wanted to install some android apps on my pc and I found Anbox as a solution, but when I installed it, didn't work and now when I try to open the browser or press CTRL+ALT+T for opening terminal it take almost a minute, the question is how to repair my system?

I'm on Ubuntu 16.0.4 LTS (Xenial)

I executed "tail -f /var/log/syslog" and get this:

Jun  7 18:24:55 ricardo org.gnome.Terminal[1501]: (gnome-terminal-server:7257): GLib-GIO-WARNING **: Failed to parse translated string '«Sin nombre»' for key 'visible-name' in schema 'org.gnome.Terminal.Legacy.Profile': 0:expected value
Jun  7 18:24:55 ricardo org.gnome.Terminal[1501]: (gnome-terminal-server:7257): GLib-GIO-WARNING **: Using untranslated default instead.
Jun  7 18:24:55 ricardo org.gnome.Terminal[1501]: (gnome-terminal-server:7257): GLib-GIO-WARNING **: Failed to parse translated string '«Sin nombre»' for key 'visible-name' in schema 'org.gnome.Terminal.Legacy.Profile': 0:expected value
Jun  7 18:24:55 ricardo org.gnome.Terminal[1501]: (gnome-terminal-server:7257): GLib-GIO-WARNING **: Using untranslated default instead.
Jun  7 18:24:55 ricardo org.gnome.Terminal[1501]: (gnome-terminal-server:7257): GLib-GIO-WARNING **: Failed to parse translated string '«Sin nombre»' for key 'visible-name' in schema 'org.gnome.Terminal.Legacy.Profile': 0:expected value
Jun  7 18:24:55 ricardo org.gnome.Terminal[1501]: (gnome-terminal-server:7257): GLib-GIO-WARNING **: Using untranslated default instead.
Jun  7 18:24:55 ricardo org.gnome.Terminal[1501]: (gnome-terminal-server:7257): GLib-GIO-WARNING **: Failed to parse translated string '«Sin nombre»' for key 'visible-name' in schema 'org.gnome.Terminal.Legacy.Profile': 0:expected value
Jun  7 18:24:55 ricardo org.gnome.Terminal[1501]: (gnome-terminal-server:7257): GLib-GIO-WARNING **: Using untranslated default instead.
Jun  7 18:24:55 ricardo org.gnome.Terminal[1501]: ** (gnome-terminal-server:7257): WARNING **: Unable to set locale modifiers with XSetLocaleModifiers()
Jun  7 18:25:01 ricardo CRON[7273]: (root) CMD (command -v debian-sa1 > /dev/null && debian-sa1 1 1)
1

I get this soved by creating the next file

~/.config/autostart/gnome-keyring-daemon.desktop

and setting the next on it:

[Desktop Entry]
Type=Application
Exec=/usr/bin/gnome-keyring-daemon
Hidden=false
NoDisplay=false
X-GNOME-Autostart-enabled=true
Name[en_US]=Gnome Keyring Daemon
Name=Gnome Keyring Daemon
Comment[en_US]=Load gnome keyring daemon
Comment=Load gnome keyring daemon

so I restarted and it was fixed.

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0

I would remove anbox and the installer:-

snap remove anbox snap remove anbox-installer

And remove the ppa:-

sudo add-apt-repository -r ppa:morphis/anbox-support

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0

Rebooting will probably take care of your issue although good *NIX admins are loathe to reboot to solve problems. It's always a good learning experience to manually troubleshoot and fix problems versus giving a machine the three finger salute.

From a terminal shell you can see what process(es) are sucking up resources. Type:

top

You can obtain similar information from the System Monitor GUI.

From there you would be able to push the "stop process" button in the GUI or kill the process with the kill command in a shell.

Killing a process that your username owns is generally pretty safe. Killing a root process can cause other problems so it's unwise to kill any root process unless you know what you're doing.

Typing the following command from a terminal shell will provide a lot more information about system issues, problems and so on that may not be so severe as to be noticeable by users.

tail -f /var/log/syslog

You may need to monitor this file for a few minutes but a quick look at what you posted indicates that you may not be connected to the Internet which will definitely cause pokey performance.

A load average of 2.27 0.82 0.55 is pretty high especially if you have a garden variety CPU. Slower User response will definitely be noticeable. The process at the top of the list is the one causing you grief. That or your PC just doesn't have much horsepower.

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  • Thanks for answering, I already tried restarting and killing "suckers" processes, but it doesn't seem to be processes using more resources than the normal, all the system works normal after restarting but google-chrome and the terminal (only when CTRL+ALT+T not in GUI clicking) not yet – Ricardo Villagrana Larios Jun 7 '17 at 22:38
  • Since anbox isn't working out for you, Popey's suggestion to remove it is good advice. Based on your original question it's not clear if anbox actually installed properly. In any case, odd that you are seeing pokey response from a machine that doesn't have a rogue process sucking up resources. You can try doing a tail -f /var/log/syslog and see what's going on there. – jones0610 Jun 7 '17 at 22:45
  • I updated the question with the result of that command. I notice that there's something wrong but I'm not actually an expert, so I don't know what's going on. And no, anbox didn't get installed – Ricardo Villagrana Larios Jun 7 '17 at 22:55
  • Monitoring syslog can be helpful as a learning experience and to identify issues that may not be obvious when you are using the machine. For example, you have an ssh authentication issue that takes 20 seconds or so to attempt, fail and timeout. Unless your hardware is extremely underpowered and under-resourced, you'd be looking for a process that is sucking up major resources, very busy swap file activity or something like that. Running top, what are your load averages when you are getting slow response? – jones0610 Jun 7 '17 at 23:08
  • Dumb question but since freedesktop isn't authenticating, you do have a connection to the Internet, right? If not, this can definitely cause pokey performance. – jones0610 Jun 7 '17 at 23:19

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