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This is how my disk partitions looked with Windows 7

This is how my partition on gpart looks now with Ubuntu

I want to install Ubuntu 17.04 on my PC and remove Windows 7 completely, but don't want to lose data on my C:, E:, & G: drives. Please help me out.

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    Don't remove Windows 7, as you may need it for BIOS updates, and other things that can only be done in Windows. If you're trying to install Ubuntu, consider shrinking or combining your NTFS partitions, and using the 24G unallocated space that you already have, to do it.
    – heynnema
    Jun 4, 2017 at 14:32
  • Lettered drives (c:, d:, e: g:, etc) are a Windows-only convention. Be prepared to learn the Linux method, and to learn how to translate between the two.
    – user535733
    Jun 4, 2017 at 16:06
  • @heynnemabut know I have one more problem since I am new to linux I am not understanding why everytime I am working I open my pc it shows me the message that "home partition has only 1.7mb space left" but I have no saved data on that?
    – bUff23
    Jun 6, 2017 at 15:07
  • Show me a current-window-only screenshot of gparted and I'll take a look. Don't delete the previous screenshot from your question... so I can compare.
    – heynnema
    Jun 6, 2017 at 15:13
  • how to take screenshots here in linux..sorry but I dont know
    – bUff23
    Jun 6, 2017 at 15:14

1 Answer 1

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From the comments...

Step #1:

Don't remove Windows 7, as you may need it for BIOS updates, and other things that can only be done in Windows. If you're trying to install Ubuntu, consider shrinking or combining your NTFS partitions, and using the 24G unallocated space that you already have, to do it.

Keep in mind that you should use Windows Disk Management application to manage NTFS partitions, and gparted to manage EXT4 and swap partitions.

Step #2:

You decided not to keep Windows, as I suggested. Hopefully you won't need it later.

In reviewing your new configuration after installing Ubuntu, you incorrectly told Ubuntu to have a separate /home partition, and you told it that sda1 (formally a NTFS reserved partition) was /home, and now /home is full because that partition was too small to hold /home to begin with.

Step #3:

Since this is a fresh Ubuntu install, I'd reinstall Ubuntu into sda8, but don't manually identify a separate /home.

Step #4:

Once Ubuntu is reinstalled and up and running again, mount sda1, and delete the /home directory structure that got created there. Don't delete anything else.

Update #1:

It looks like sda1 was a NTFS reserved partition, but got reinit as EXT4 when you specified that /home was to be on sda1. Just reinstall Ubuntu into sda8 without specifying /boot or /home, although you can say that swap is on sda7 like it is now (although 17.04 might create a /swapfile anyway).

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  • regarding step 4 ..how should I delete /home ..from gpart?
    – bUff23
    Jun 6, 2017 at 15:48
  • You don't do it from gparted. You do it from Ubuntu File Manager or terminal.
    – heynnema
    Jun 6, 2017 at 16:20
  • I am unable to delete the folder -manually no option is coming and by terminal it says "cannot be deleted :is a directory"
    – bUff23
    Jun 7, 2017 at 5:10
  • Gehat I am thinking if I reinstall ubuntu and make sda1 /boot partition
    – bUff23
    Jun 7, 2017 at 5:11
  • It looks like sda1 was a NTFS reserved partition, but got reinit as EXT4 when you specified that /home was to be on sda1. Just reinstall Ubuntu into sda8 without specifying /boot or /home, although you can say that swap is on sda7 like it is now.
    – heynnema
    Jun 7, 2017 at 13:38

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