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I have installed "Helvetica" in Ubuntu, but it have a bug with Google Chrome. Well, I removed it from ~/.fonts/ folder, but the problem persist.

The problem is that Chrome (and also any Electron app, like Wmail) render the Helvetica font without spaces and with blue circle around the number, as you can see in the previous screenshot.

Here are two screenshot of the problem

helvetica problem

And after I replaced the font with Arial, this was the result

enter image description here

There is any other font folder or any font cache that Ubuntu store for Google Chrome?

  • What bug? What problem? Do you have a screenshot? – Anwar May 29 '17 at 17:19
  • Here is a screenshot. imgur.com/SZSSxom – euDennis May 30 '17 at 1:11
  • Please add a real screenshot. It's very difficult to recognize any problem with the provided one. And please be precise when you say "problem". – Anwar May 30 '17 at 14:00
  • The problem is that Chrome (and also any Electron app, like Wmail) render the Helvetica font without spaces and with blue circle around the number, as you can see in the previous screenshot. I just upload two screenshots from Wmail, with and without the "Helvetica" font - imgur.com/a/4JhYt. I already deleted any "Helvetica" font in ~/.fonts and /usr/share/fonts/ and used the fc-cache -rf, so I don't understand why this happen. – euDennis May 31 '17 at 20:16
  • What's the link of the pages? btw, why do you think the font set there is helvetica? Which version of chrome do you use? Also can you go to the "Computed" tab of the "Element" category and see the name of the font? – Anwar Jun 1 '17 at 5:23
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The font causing the problem is "Emoji One". I had the same problem and after removing the package fonts-emojione, the problem was gone.

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1

I just discovered that you can edit the font used to match the "Helvetica"

In terminal, fc-match "Helvetica" shows that Helvetica wasn't set (or is set to a bad font).

Make a new file /etc/fonts/conf.d/99-my-fix-missing-helvetica-spaces.conf to set it to a working font:

<fontconfig> <match> <test name="family"><string>Helvetica</string></test> <edit name="family" mode="assign" binding="strong"> <string>Liberation Sans</string> </edit> </match> </fontconfig>

(You could use e.g. fc-match Arial if you want to use the same one as the one matching Arial.)

Problem solved :)

Source: https://seasonofcode.com/posts/how-to-set-default-fonts-and-font-aliases-on-linux.html

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0

Wide system fonts are locate at:

/usr/share/fonts/

and for each user as you know we have:

~/.fonts

Also after removing a font you should run:

fc-cache -rf

to regenerate fonts cache. Try removing Google Chrome caches too it might help you.

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  • I tried that, no success. I delete every "Helvetica" font from my computer. imgur.com/SZSSxom – euDennis May 28 '17 at 1:59

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