11

I had to remove Chrome to have enough space to upgrade from 16.10 to 17.04. I downloaded the latest version from Google. But when it opens in the Ubuntu Software Manager, and I click on "Install", nothing happens.

closed as off-topic by David Foerster, Zanna, WinEunuuchs2Unix, Pilot6, Eric Carvalho Apr 17 '17 at 23:18

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Bug reports and problems specific to development version of Ubuntu should be reported on Launchpad so that developers can see, track and fix these issues." – David Foerster, Zanna, WinEunuuchs2Unix, Pilot6, Eric Carvalho
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • A fix has been released bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gnome-software/+bug/1672424 – Steve Hope Apr 17 '17 at 16:58
  • You'd be better off installing chromium instead :D – Adam F Apr 17 '17 at 18:06
  • 1
    I'm voting to close this question as off topic because it doesn't actually contain a question and because bug reports are off topic. On top of that this bug was fixed in "proposed" which is going to make this thread moot soon enough. – David Foerster Apr 17 '17 at 21:02
9

Gdebi worked for me

Gdebi is a .deb package installer, that serves as an alternative to Software Center for this specific task I.e, installing .deb files.

All you need to do is install it and open your .deb files through it

To install gdebi copy and paste the command below in your terminal.

sudo apt-get install gdebi

For future use make sure to set it as default until an update fixes the issue with Software Center.

Fix has been released for this bug

4

First that you need to setup the key and repository.

Setup key with:

wget -q -O - https://dl-ssl.google.com/linux/linux_signing_key.pub | sudo apt-key add - 

Setup repository with:

sudo sh -c 'echo "deb [arch=amd64] http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main" >> /etc/apt/sou

3rd Party Repository: Google Chrome

Then use apt-get

sudo apt-get install google-chrome-stable
  • Xubuntu 17.04: stephen@Aspire-V3:~$ sudo apt-get install google-chrome-stable <--snipped--> Package 'google-chrome-stable' has no installation candidate – Steve Hope Apr 17 '17 at 12:04
  • 3rd Party Repository: Google Chrome try the commands here – Kishlay Kumar Apr 17 '17 at 12:07
  • Consider editing improvements into your answer as comments can be deleted for various reasons (and not everyone reads them). Improving the quality of your answer may stop it from showing up in the low quality answer queue. – Elder Geek Apr 17 '17 at 12:23
4

There might be some dependency problem. So, what you could do is:

  1. Download chrome .deb file from official chrome site
  2. Open terminal in that download folder
  3. in terminal run these commands:

commands

sudo dpkg -i google-chrome-stable_current_amd64.deb
sudo apt install -f
sudo dpkg -i google-chrome-stable_current_amd64.deb 

So, the first command will try to install the package. And if there is any dependency problem, then it will fail.

Second command will force apt to automatically install all missing/required dependencies, and the bet part is you don't even need to specify anything, apt will automatically get those.

In 3rd step when you try to install chrome again, now it will be installed successfully.

You can follow these steps for all deb files.

  • 1
    Apt has been improved so that it can handle .deb files. Try sudo apt install google-chrome-stable_current_amd64.deb, and it will handle any dependency problems. – Chai T. Rex Apr 17 '17 at 19:24
  • @ChaiT.Rex thanks for informing, i didn't knew about that. – drmirk Apr 18 '17 at 5:50
  • I cannot find any information about option -f by man – yode Dec 9 '17 at 17:44
  • @yode "apt" is a high level implementation of "package management system", whereas "apt-get" is low-level implementation. You should do man apt-get, and then you will see "-f" means --fix-broken – drmirk Dec 10 '17 at 17:10
3

You can use the command line utility dpkg to install .deb files.

sudo dpkg -i <deb file path>
  • 3
    It's better to use sudo apt install <.deb file> these days, since that will install the .deb file and handle dependencies as well. From past experience, dpkg will stop unsuccessfully halfway through installing Chrome and tell you to run apt install -f. – Chai T. Rex Apr 17 '17 at 19:22
  • @ChaiT.Rex Never knew about installing .deb packages from apt (thanks for sharing), this would probably be the best way to install it. (If the apt command works in the same way with autoremove that makes uninstalling the package with dependencies a lot easier also.) – JohnDoe Apr 18 '17 at 5:17

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.