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From this question i know upgrading ubuntu will not upgrade the php.

  1. But what about apache and mysql? will those upgraded?

Also upgrading from 10.04 to 16.04 has 3 steps as mentioned here.

My Current Ubuntu version is 10.04.4 LTS with

Apache: 2.2.14  
Mysql: 5.1.66  
Php: 5.3.2
  1. Can i upgrade ubuntu to 16.04 LTS without upgrade any of the apache,mysql and php version?

FYI, As per my earlier question I am trying to upgrade to ubuntu 16.04 to update to TLS1.2

I am little bit confused since i am new to ubuntu. Please guide me.

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    Yes, they will be upgraded. Except for PHP - I don't think there is an automatic upgrade path for PHP5 in older releases to 16.04's PHP – muru Apr 4 '17 at 10:14
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The main question that probably needs answering is, why do you require to stay on these old versions of the software? They no longer receive security updates, nor bugfixes, from anybody; and software you are running on top of it probably has updates too.

You would be best served to investigate a proper path to migrate your web application data to newer versions of software and libraries.

To answer your stated question:

In short: upgrading your distro upgrades the software to that distro's upported versions.

A distro release is comprised not just of the installer of the distro, but also the software in the repositories, for that release.

Updating a release, amongst other things, switches your software repositories to the ones dedicated for that new release.

These repositories supply the versions of applications and libraries available - of which MySQL, PHP, Apache, etc.

Older versions are not supported, as in, they do not receive bugfixes and security updates. A release-based distro's repositories carry a specific version for this purpose: for the long term maintenance, a specific version of each software (or in some cases software major series, like python vs python3 or php5 vs php7) is targeted.

In the case of MySQL and Apache, there is typically only one version of each, the "latest", as per the distro's release guidelines. If you want a newer version, you can add a PPA.

If you want an older version, you need either to run an older distro, or compile the older version from source. Neither is advised.

So by updgrading your distro, you would be upgrading all software on it. This, assuming it is even possible to upgrade straight from 10.04 to 16.04 - you've skipped an LTS, and your version has long been EOL.

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    If the php version changed from 5.3.2 to 7 then i need to stabilize my site (by replacing deprecated function all over the site) which would take long time. But my aim is just to upgrade to TLS 1.2 (OpenSSL 1.0.1 or higher). That is why i wanted to keep my php,apache and mysql version same. – siddiq Apr 4 '17 at 12:13
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    Upgrading to 12.04 would get you openssl 1.0.1 while keeping apache 2.2.x and php 5.3.x – Peter Green Apr 4 '17 at 13:46
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    php5 still exists in 16.04 , separate from php7. Assuming the upgrade path were still available, you should still be able to continue on php5. In this instance it seems you just want to stay on the major release track, rather than a specific oint-version. But working towards php7 compatibility would be a worthwhile long-term project. apache2 can still be upgraded. Good to try to upgrade to new LTS a few months after it is released to keep your updates incremental, rather than all in a one-off like this... – taifwa Apr 4 '17 at 14:16
  • @taifwa I guess MySQL will be upgraded to 5.7.17? Can i use this version of MySQL version from the older php version? Or I have to install separate MySQL version ? Is it even possible to install two different MySQL version in the same server? – siddiq May 11 '17 at 11:30
  • The version of mysql-server shipped with 16.04 is 5.7.18-0ubuntu0.16.04.1 ; PHP from the repos should certainly, in my experience, support whatever MySQL from the repos you install – taifwa May 14 '17 at 11:42

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