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I've downloaded the gparted "application" from a website using my windows machine, i've put the .iso image onto a usb and transfered it onto my linux machine. I've then followed some instructions and mounted it onto my machine. At this point i was expecting some sort of application to be there where i could double click it and simply run it.

My question is, once i've mounted the gparted iso onto my machine, how do i "run" it. I'm a windows user so i was expecting a .exe file. Is there a step i've missed out?

Additional points: I'm downloading this because i need to reduce the size of my main partition.

Link where i got the gparted iso from: http://gparted.org/download.php

Instructions i followed to mount the iso:

sudo mkdir /media/iso "/n" sudo mount -o loop myIsoFile.iso /media/iso

I'm using ubuntu with kernel 4.8

If i've missed anything out please let me know

  • The gparted is to be used as boot device since its on the usb make sure its installed there as a bootable iso then change the boot order from your bios (assuming the boot order doesn't have usb in first place). Now plugin the usb and boot into it. The gparted will boot up and present options to modify your disk... NOTE please backup first, don't say you weren't warned – George Udosen Mar 26 '17 at 12:30
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The ISO is meant to be burned to a CD, but you could also use dd to write it to the flash stick. If you need more info on how to do this, then just drop a comment below :)

Also, keep in mind that you can't resize your main partition while you're booted from it.

  • Thanks for the reply. I don't actually have any CDs and my linux computer isn't connected to the computer hence the use of the USB to transfer it onto my linux machine from my windows machine. I can't use the dd command in windows (or i don't think i can) – CoolDude Mar 25 '17 at 23:11
  • @bahjat Correct, Windows doesn't have dd. You will have to copy the ISO to your Linux machine, and then dd it back to the flash stick. I suggest adding the BS=4M argument, which will make it go much faster. – Android Dev Mar 25 '17 at 23:13
  • i'm sorry but i don't understand, the dd command just copies the iso image. I can do that by copying the .iso image using my GUI. Also why do i need to copy the .iso back into my USB? I'm really new to linux – CoolDude Mar 25 '17 at 23:22
  • @bahjat - Okay, first things first: you will not be able to resize your partition if you run Gparted from your normal Linux install, because as I said earlier, EXT4 partitions can't be resized while they are mounted. Thus, you have to boot the Gparted live ISO file. The reason that you have to use dd is because simply copying the ISO to the flash drive with the GUI will not write the MBR sector, and thus the USB drive won't be bootable. Also, just FYI, when you dd the ISO back to the flash drive, any other data on there will be erased. – Android Dev Mar 26 '17 at 0:19

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