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This question already has an answer here:

I have done research, and am looking to eliminate Win XP from an old computer, and want to run XFCE with libreoffice.

  1. Main question: Do I download and create .exe file on media of XFCE or Xubuntu?

  2. Is XFCE something you install AFTER Xubuntu, or does it include Xubuntu?

  3. Should I leave WinXP on computer, then install OS which will let me wipe drive before installing new OS?

  4. If there is a great installer guide that answers these questions, point me that way! If not, details appreciated.

marked as duplicate by Mark Kirby, user.dz, Aaron, heemayl, David Foerster Sep 29 '16 at 18:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I agree that this is a duplicate of the other question, but to answer one of your questions, XFCE comes with the installation of Xubuntu. – Arronical Sep 29 '16 at 12:51
  • Welcome to Ask Ubuntu! We’re sorry, but Ask Ubuntu is not a forum, but a Question & Answer site: it works best if you ask one question, so you can receive one answer. When you ask multiple questions, you need to find one expert versed in multiple areas, which becomes unlikelier the more questions you put into, well, one question! ;-) So please, split up your question into multiple questions and drop me a comment so I can answer one of your questions. – David Foerster Sep 29 '16 at 18:47
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1) Do I download and create .exe file on media of XFCE or Xubuntu?

You need to visit http://xubuntu.org/ and download the latest .iso file (currently 16.04 LTS) . Then you can burn it to either a DVD or USB Pen Drive depending on your choice of media. There are many available tools for former method and for latter you can use UNetBootin or similar software.

2) Is XFCE something you install AFTER Xubuntu, or does it include Xubuntu?

Nope, Xubuntu already includes the XFCE Desktop.

3) Should I leave WinXP on computer, then install OS which will let me wipe drive before installing new OS?

You can edit existing partitions using gparted to keep XP in a dual boot setup, but I don't recommend that as XP is no longer supported. Better backup your entire data and perform a clean installation of Xubuntu.

4) If there is a great installer guide that answers these questions, point me that way! If not, details appreciated.

http://ubuntuhandbook.org is a good one, though I haven't tried it personally. However, a simple Google Search or a search on AskUbuntu should answer any question you may have. Best of Luck.

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Xubuntu is a full Ubuntu system including a complete XFCE desktop environment and a suite of commonly used applications such as browser, email client and office applications. If you install Xubuntu, all those things (and more) will be preinstalled.

To install Xubuntu, there is no exe or other Windows application. You need to download the iso image file from http://xubuntu.org/getxubuntu/ and either burn it to a DVD (simple method, but slow installation), or you write the image to an USB drive (more complex, but faster installation and the drive may be reused for something else again later). The steps needed are the same as for a regular Ubuntu installation, which is described at How do I install Ubuntu?. Then you boot your computer from the created DVD or USB drive to start the installation. You might need to change your BIOS boot order to do that.

Whether you wipe your disk before booting the Xubuntu installer or leave it and let the installer overwrite everything should normally make no difference. I personally would just try and leave it to the installer, only manually wipe the disk if you experience problems during the installation.

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XFCE is a desktop environment, and hence part of Xubuntu. In fact, it owes its name to it

The name Xubuntu is a portmanteau of Xfce and Ubuntu, as it uses the Xfce desktop environment, instead of Ubuntu's Unity.

Just like there's, for example, a ‘ready-made’ Ubuntu-with-Mate-Desktop.

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If you are still on Windows for the time being, and you need to turn a Linux.iso file into a bootable USB stick (the ‘boot CDs’ of the modern age...), Linux Live USB creator is a fine tool, since it does just that (but under Windows... save you some hen-and-egg problem).

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