0

I had window 10 on compaq laptop then I install ubuntu 12.04. After some days following message was showing in ubuntu 12.04.

enter image description here

then in ubuntu 12.04 I moved file from "\boot\efi" to another location. Moved files may be(I am not remembering clearly) "1. HP, 2. Microsoft, 3. Third I am not remembering". after that I reboot laptop then following message was showing " GNU GRUB version 1.99-21ubuntu3.19

Minimal BASH-like editing is supported. For the first word, TAB lists all possible command completions. Anywhere else TAB lists possible device or file completion.

grub>_"

If I go 'boot devices option' by f9 key then selecting 'boot from EFI File>NO Volume Label>EFI>Boot>bkpbootx64.efi' Following was showing [message][2]

then I make bootable usb with ubuntu 16.04 and ran boot repair commands i.e.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair

then following message was shown

"GPT detected. please create a BIOS-Boot partition(>1MB, unformatted file system, bios_grub flag). This can be performed via tools such as Gparted. Then try again. Alternatively, you can retry after activating the [Separate/boot/efi partition:] option."

what to do

3

You will have to move those files back somehow. The easiest way would probably be to use a working computer to make a LiveUSB and boot from that. If you choose Try Ubuntu, you'll be able to move files back to the EFI partition (which you will have to mount using Gparted or the terminal).

EFI is not something you want to mess with. It may be annoying that it keeps telling you you have low space in it, but you need to either ignore that or research which files you need or how to increase space. Don't just go moving random files. That will never end well.

  • I made bootable pendrive with ubuntu 16.04 and in "try ubuntu" mode I ran boot repair commands i.e. "1. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair 2. sudo apt-get update 3. sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair" then it shows "GPT detected. please create a BIOS-Boot partition(>1MB, unformatted file system, bios_grub flag). This can be performed via tools such as Gparted. Then try again. Alternatively, you can retry after activating the [Separate/boot/efi partition:] option." – Jay Hanuman Sep 10 '16 at 16:03
  • 1
    @JayHanuman all you need to do is copy the files you moved back into the EFI partition, most likely sda1. – TheWanderer Sep 10 '16 at 17:07
  • Zacharee1 as I am in "try ubuntu" mode in Ubuntu 16.04. so ubuntu 12.04 (which I installed previously) files are not showing. it shows current i.e. ubuntu 16.04 in try ubuntu mode, so I am not locating previous files and unable to move. – Jay Hanuman Sep 10 '16 at 17:14
  • 1
    If you are getting that you need a bios_grub partition, then you have booted in BIOS mode, not UEFI boot mode. Reboot flash drive in UEFI boot mode, not CSM/BIOS/Legacy mode. Then reinstall grub's UEFI version. But you still need to restore the other files you moved. – oldfred Sep 10 '16 at 17:18
  • oldfred how to reinstall grub's UEFI version and then reinstalling grub's UEFI can I see ubutu 12.04 files. because I am unable to see ubuntu 12.04 files to move files in correct position. – Jay Hanuman Sep 10 '16 at 17:36
1

Zacharee1 and oldfred are giving you useful advice. I'd just like to chime in with some links to additional EFI information that may help you understand what's going wrong, and therefore to avoid this sort of problem in the future:

Some of these pages are geared toward helping you install Ubuntu or Linux, which of course you've already done; but they nonetheless provide useful background information.

I'd like to reiterate something that Zacharee1 wrote:

Don't just go moving random files. That will never end well.

Most of the files on an Ubuntu installation exist for a reason, and exist in a particular location for a reason. Moving (or worse, deleting) them without understanding what they are is never a good idea. Sometimes you can get away with it just because the files relate to programs you don't use, but moving random files is like playing Russian Roulette. You played and lost. Worse, you seem to have moved files related to Windows' boot loader, which has of course affected Windows.

You may be able to find your files with the following command:

sudo find /mount/point -name "bootmgfw\.efi"

Change /mount/point to wherever you've mounted the partition to which you moved the files in question. This command will find the bootmgfw.efi file, which is Windows' main boot loader file. (Note that the command is likely to take several minutes to finish searching the partition.) Once you've found the file, you can copy its original directory tree back to where it belongs. (That file should be EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi on the ESP.)

Windows creates a smallish ESP to begin with -- sometimes as small as 100 MiB, on older EFI-enabled versions of Windows. This is still normally plenty big enough to hold all the files needed on the ESP, so something was probably storing stuff there inappropriately. (OTOH, maybe it got filled up with log files or screen shots from a boot loader.) Identifying what's chewing up the space will take some investigation and understanding of what the files on the ESP are -- the preceding referenced pages will help with that.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.