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This question already has an answer here:

I upgraded successfully. Now, when I run this:

dpkg --list | grep linux-image

I get this:

ii  linux-image-3.13.0-24-generic                               3.13.0-24.47                                                amd64        Linux kernel image for version 3.13.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
rc  linux-image-4.4.0-31-generic                                4.4.0-31.50                                                 amd64        Linux kernel image for version 4.4.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-4.4.0-34-generic                                4.4.0-34.53                                                 amd64        Linux kernel image for version 4.4.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-4.4.0-36-generic                                4.4.0-36.55                                                 amd64        Linux kernel image for version 4.4.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-extra-3.13.0-24-generic                         3.13.0-24.47                                                amd64        Linux kernel extra modules for version 3.13.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
rc  linux-image-extra-4.4.0-31-generic                          4.4.0-31.50                                                 amd64        Linux kernel extra modules for version 4.4.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-extra-4.4.0-34-generic                          4.4.0-34.53                                                 amd64        Linux kernel extra modules for version 4.4.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-extra-4.4.0-36-generic                          4.4.0-36.55                                                 amd64        Linux kernel extra modules for version 4.4.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-generic                                         4.4.0.36.38                                                 amd64        Generic Linux kernel image

So my question is: What do I do with all the extra modules? Do I trash them? If so, how? or do I keep them?

marked as duplicate by Anwar, Zanna, Byte Commander, Eric Carvalho, Kaz Wolfe Aug 31 '16 at 0:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Just a thought... If you are not able to find out how to uninstall a software package on your own yet, maybe you should not yet attempt to remove kernel packages just because you think you might possibly gain some minimal performance gain (or a screwed up system). – Byte Commander Aug 30 '16 at 20:02
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if you want to remove them, then try running

sudo apt-get autoremove

in the terminal

this can't be undone, so make sure that your system is running okay with your current kernel before attempting to do anything

what you will get from removing these older unused modules is some free MBs

  • Byte Commander -- I wanted to remove packages because Ubuntu wanted to install updates. When I told it to go ahead and do so, Ubuntu shot back that there was insufficient hdd space in which to install the updates. FYI I'm a writer, not a programmer. Every time Ubuntu wants me to do something of an administrative sort, I am terrified because I don't know what to do. So I come to these places begging help because I don't know what else to do. It's hard to learn to solve Linux problems when you don't know what's wrong or how to fix it. You weren't born a Linux expert. Jimmy – Jimmy Montague Sep 1 '16 at 2:08

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