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This question already has an answer here:

I have read that upgrading from 14.04 to 16.04 is not possible. Instead there is a recommendation to upgrade in steps through all releases and ultimately 16.04. Is this information correct?

I did attempt a staged upgrade on a 32-bit Dell laptop and when I got to 15.10 the system would not start the GUI. I did a fresh install of 16.04 and it worked just fine.

Can one upgrade from 14.04 to 16.04 directly and what are the steps to make that a success? Ubuntu is all I use and I cannot lose my current files and apps.

marked as duplicate by muru, Rinzwind, Videonauth, mikewhatever, Eric Carvalho Jun 6 '16 at 22:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • As muru has stated there's an answer to the same question in the link above. Kyodake's answer seems to be quite a complicated way to go about it. After the first point release of 16.04 your system will tell you that the upgrade is available but you can follow the links to here: askubuntu.com/questions/125392/… and see another way to do that is to use the command do-release-upgrade -d -might be worth waiting until your system offers 16.04 to you, but you should be able to upgrade smoothly from LTS to LTS – pHeLiOn Jun 6 '16 at 20:09
  • The upgrade instructions make it clear that upgrading from 14.04 is supported help.ubuntu.com/community/XenialUpgrades However, see Q 125392 (link in prev. comment) for why you may still be getting "No new release found". – jrennie Jun 11 '16 at 13:05
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Procedure:

First: You need to update the system.

Open a terminal,

Press Ctrl+Alt+T

Run it:

exec sudo -i
apt-get update
apt-get dist-upgrade

Now edit the file /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades and change the value of Prompt from normal to lts, continue running:

nano /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades

Ctrl+O Save File

Ctrl+X Close nano

Reboot your system to finish installing updates, and to upgrade to new available version:

Open a terminal,

Press Ctrl+Alt+T

Run it:

exec sudo -i
update-manager -d

Software Updater will show up and search for the new release.

However, Ubuntu 16.04 is available now.

Press the button Upgrade to start upgrading to Ubuntu 16.04

The Software Updater will ask you to confirm still you want to upgrade, press Start Upgrade to begin installing Ubuntu 16.04

Now, the Software Updater will prepare to start setting up new software channels, and after a few minutes, the software updater will notify you the details the number of packages are going to be removed, and number of packages are going to be installed, press Start upgrade to continue.

Ended the dist-upgrade, reboot your system and:

Open a terminal,

Press Ctrl+Alt+T

Run it:

exec sudo -i
dpkg --configure -a
apt-get -f install
apt-get update
apt-get dist-upgrade
apt-get autoremove
apt-get clean
  • What are the reasons behind using exec sudo -i instead of just sudo -i? – edwinksl Jun 6 '16 at 19:52
  • 1
    exec command treats its arguments as the specification of one or more subprocesses to execute. The arguments take the form of a standard shell pipeline where each arg becomes one word of a command, and each distinct command becomes a subprocess. – kyodake Jun 6 '16 at 23:07

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