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I have not worked with Linux (Ubuntu) that much... just installing it on some computers and know a little bits about getting around.

With that said... if someone can point me in the right direction as to how I could copy files from a Floppy Diskette that was created under Linux (from what I was told) to another Floppy Diskette that would be awesome.

I am a beginner here and do not know much about Linux (Ubuntu). The version of Ubuntu that I have been installing/using is 14.04.3.

thanks in advance

  • Where are you stuck, exactly? Do you have a physical floppy drive in / connected to the computer? Does anything happen when you insert the diskette? – steeldriver Jan 27 '16 at 19:12
  • Why? Floppies have been obsolete for 15-20 years. They finally quit putting them in new computers around 5 years ago. They can barely hold one modern photo. – psusi Jan 27 '16 at 23:32
  • psusi-----Why floppies... I don't know why the vendor has not "upgraded their process": the vendor programmed their program to go to a Floppy to obtain the password. when the user uses the program it, the password is stored on the floppy. I understand that floppies are not used that much now a days however there are some industries that still use them.... like manufacturing on older equipment. – Luv2bike2nv Feb 2 '16 at 16:48
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Is it a boot/device floppy or does the floppy contain data? Is the drive recognized by Linux?

Most floppies should be formated using FAT12, which is the same disk-format as DOS or Windows are using. In that case you can use any tool (cp, Desktop environment). A bytewise copy of the whole floppy without knowledge about the file system can be achieved by the dd command.

Since 10.04 you should be able to mount a floppy using the udisks package:

# install the package, if not installed
sudo apt-get install udisks
# and mount the floppy
udisks --mount /dev/fd0

Before removing the floppy unmount it:

# unmount floppy before removing
udisks --unmount /dev/fd0

Information about udisks are taken from https://wiki.ubuntuusers.de/Diskette/ (page is in German).

Byte wise copy of the disk

Your disk may not contain any valid file system. In that case you can copy your disk byte-by-byte. Therefore, insert your disk in your drive. Next try to copy the whole content to a temporary file on your computer:

# root permissions are required, therefore sudo 
# is put in front of the commands
# copy the inserted disk to the tmp folder
sudo du if=/dev/fd0 of=/tmp/disk.bin bs=512

# insert a blank disk inside your drive and 
# copy content of disk 1 onto that disk
# WARNING: ALL DATA ON THAT DISK WILL BE DELETED!!!
sudo du if=/tmp/disk.bin of=/dev/fd0 bs=512

The first command copies all data from your disk to the system. The second command copies the data to a brand new disk. The content of that disk will be deleted!

You can keep the image in /tmp/disk.bin as a backup. In that case, you better move/copy it to your home folder otherwise it will be deleted by the next reboot.

Hope that solves your problem!

  • Thank you for your response. I am not in the office today, however when I do return i will follow your suggestions... thanks again – Luv2bike2nv Jan 28 '16 at 18:30
  • Frank and steeldriver---- I need to copy the files (password file) on one floppy to a new floppy. I installed the udisks and tried to mount the floppy however I am getting "unable to access "floppy disk" error mounting system-managed device /dev/fd0:command-line 'mount"/media/floppy0" exited with non-zero status 32:mount: you must specify the filesystem type." the floppy drive is an internal floppy drive on a Dell computer – Luv2bike2nv Feb 2 '16 at 16:51
  • the floppy is used in a manufacturing environment where the program, on a windows computer, when it is run it goes out to the floppy drive and accesses the password file on it and the program runs. I am not the person who uses the program, I have not seen it work... all i know is that we have 2 diskettes that contain the password file. one of the diskettes is not good (failing), the other diskette is in working order and the user wants to get a couple of backup diskettes just in case the good diskette fails. – Luv2bike2nv Feb 2 '16 at 17:04
  • I added some instruction for a byte wise copy of the disk above – Frank Förster Feb 2 '16 at 19:46

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