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I want to install JAVA, but the installation instructions ask me to create a new folder, called /java/, into the standard /usr/ folder.

But this folder is blocked. I mean, I can not to create a new folder on it, with the PCManFM file manager, because that option is grey.

So I guess there should be a command to create it from a Terminal session. (With sudo, maybe?)

How can I get it? Which is the right command to get it?

4 Answers 4

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Create the folder from a command line terminal using:

sudo mkdir /usr/java

You need sudo to make changes to /usr because /usr is owned by the root user.

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  • Yes, exactly that. Can you elaborate on why sudo , though ? Commented Jan 4, 2016 at 4:27
  • @Serg the folder /usr is owned by root:root, so you need root privileges to modify it Commented Jan 4, 2016 at 4:28
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    @zwork <.< I know, with 22k rep I already know that. I'm trying to push people to improve their answers here Commented Jan 4, 2016 at 4:30
  • @Serg sorry, didn't check your profile Commented Jan 4, 2016 at 4:39
  • @zwork it's all good ^_^ I probably should have worded differently my first comment Commented Jan 4, 2016 at 4:40
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I'm going to address two parts of your question: java installation and folder creation.

Java installation

We already have a question about that: How can I install Sun/Oracle's proprietary Java JDK 6/7/8 or JRE?.All of the necessary commands are there, and I strongly suggest you read their manual pages with man COMMAND in terminal.

There's also open-source version of Java, Open JDK. Installation of that is somewhat simpler

sudo apt-get install openjdk-7-jre openjdk-7-jdk icedtea-7-plugin

That's pretty much it - apt-get will take care of everything. When you install some package with apt-get or dpkg there should be preinstall and postinstall scripts that come along with the package, and run automatically to set up whatever program you're getting.

Folder Creation

Folder ( in linux terminology - directory ) creation, just like file creation, depends on the permissions. If a folder has the following permissions,

drwxr-xr-x 15 testuser  testuser   4096 Nov 22 12:34 testuser/

that means the owner of that folder testuser can read-write-execute stuff there (first rwx), and group testuser can only read and execute stuff there - that's the r-x part, and final r-x part means read execute for any other groups or users.

/usr folder is owned by root user, so only root can write there, that means create files or folder. Hence for that you need sudo to gain root privileges temporarily.

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You have a few choices:

  • gksudo pcmanfm will request you enter your password, then open PCManFM as root, which is somewhat dangerous because if you are not careful you may unintentionally modify system files.

  • sudo mkdir /usr/java will create the directory directly.

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  • I know what OP uses PCManFM , but this is still Ubuntu and there's still Nautilus, and nautilus has nautilus-admin for right clicking and opening file/directory with admin privileges. You might want to include that into your answer Commented Jan 4, 2016 at 4:26
  • @Serg I've never heard of nautilus-admin and I don't have nautilus on this box to test it so I won't include that because I have no idea what it is.
    – cat
    Commented Jan 4, 2016 at 4:30
  • In my laptop, I use Lubuntu 15.10 and it doesn't have Nautilus. The file manager of Lubuntu is PCManFM. In my desktop PC, I use Ubuntu Studio 15.10 and it doesn't have Nautilus. The File manager of Ubuntu Studio is Thunar.
    – Juan
    Commented Jan 4, 2016 at 12:36
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Creates folders and files

mkdir -p ~/example(Folder)/text(Folder)
touch ~/example(folders)/text(Folder)/text{1..420}.txt
chmod -R 757 ~/example (folder with rights)


Move the text to another created folder

mkdir -p /Sturrage/V1Tst/Memes
mv ~/example/text/text{1..125}.txt /Sturrage/V1Tst/Memes


Same thing but with another folder to put all the text files that are left behind and with rights and user.

mkdir -p /V1Tst/Trash
cp ~/example/text/* /V1Tst/Trash
chmod -R 727 /V1Tst
chown -R user:group /V1Tst
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  • Welcome to Ask Ubuntu! You might be able to improve this answer with providing the steps needed in more detail to make it a rock solid answer.
    – Videonauth
    Commented Jul 5, 2016 at 0:08

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