12

When performing ls -l I encountered a column I don't recognize.

drwxrwxr-x   7 user user    4096 × ×× 29 13:54 .eclipse
drwxrwxr-x   3 user user    4096 × ×× 30 09:30 workspace
drwxrwxr-x   3 user user    4096 ××¦×  1 08:13 something

What are those x's?

x xx  
xx|x

Thanks

12

Try:

LANG=C ls -l

There should be a month name, for example (Dec):

drwxrwxr-x. 15 user user    4096 Dec  4 16:22 NetBeansProjects

May be locale setting are incorrect

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    If LANG=C has no effect, try LC_ALL=C instead. LANG sets a default, which can be overridden by several other things; LC_ALL overrides everything else. – zwol Dec 10 '15 at 16:29
  • 3
    You've explained how to maybe get rid of them, but what are they? – Octopus Dec 10 '15 at 19:25
  • 1
    @Octopus The question to ask might be: What language are they? – kasperd Dec 10 '15 at 19:25
  • 1
    @kasperd they are not in any language. They are meaningless glyphs that appear when locale char-encoding is inconsistent with the terminal font. To see what the language related variables are set to, use the locale command. – arielf Dec 12 '15 at 3:02

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