2

Please leave all security words beside.

I'm the only one who has access to Ubuntu server and I login to it only when I have something to work with system administration. So I know what I'm doing and I'm aware of it. Now my system works with sudo without asking for password. Is it possible that it runs (system) programs without typing sudo?

And once again - I understand that someone can see this as security mistake, but please, don't write about it.

  • 1
    sudo -i try this command – BeGood Nov 24 '15 at 6:05
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    Possible duplicate of Execute sudo without Password? – Florian Diesch Nov 24 '15 at 6:07
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    sudo 's main purpose is to grant a user root access. If you want to always run as root, well, enable the root password and run only as root . . . – Sergiy Kolodyazhnyy Nov 24 '15 at 7:21
  • How do you log in? Over shh or do you have physical access to the machine? Does it use a GUI? – terdon Nov 24 '15 at 10:44
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    @FlorianDiesch not really a dupe. This is asking about ways of avoiding sudo altogether, not for ways to run it without a password. – terdon Nov 24 '15 at 10:45
1

Type

sudo -i

To your terminál. It creates new root Shell.

1

Most convenient method of doing this is using

sudo -s

This will drop you to a sudo(root) shell.. sudo -i is actual login as root

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    I think sudo -i is less likely to mess up your permissions like sudo -s sometimes can – mchid Nov 24 '15 at 8:39
  • Which is why sudo -i is usually preferred. That will start a full login shell and read the relevant startup files, ignoring the value of the env_reset setting. In most cases, that's what you want. – terdon Nov 24 '15 at 10:48
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Thanks for all answers. I will check suggestions. I expected that I can login with user (let's say John) and that John can work without typing SUDO (it is different from typing password - it is already disabled). The user Root is disabled at the moment for login, because there are many attempts to login :-)

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