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So here's my situation: I have a pc with dual boot between Windows 10 and the latest Ubuntu 64 bit.

Because I installed Ubuntu just for work, I only gave it 30 gb. The / partition has 15 gb, swap has 6 gb and /home has 9 gb.

But now I found out that I can access files from the Windows partition and use them. That made me wonder if I can install games on the Windows partition and run them from Ubuntu.

I imagine that I can't install them on the Windows partition via Ubuntu, but can I boot Windows, install the games, restart and boot Ubuntu, and play them from there?

I don't plan to use Ubuntu for gaming btw, I'm just curious.

Edit: To explain better: I want to install Linux games in the Windows partition (C:), and run them from Ubuntu boot. Basically, I can boot with Ubuntu and access all files I have in the Windows partition. I can load images, play music and videos, etc. So, I am wondering if I can install linux games in the Windows partition and play them.

Edit 2: Using Steam, if I try to set the instalation folder in /media/something (where Windows files are), it will pop up a message "New Steam library folder must be on a filesystem mounted with execute permissions"

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Short answer: YES!

You can use your Windows partition for storage of anything, including games. Just make sure you don't choose the Hibernate option in Windows, or else you won't be able to access that partition from Ubuntu.

  • Thanks, but any idea how I can I install them? (either from Ubuntu OS or Windows OS). Using Steam, if I try to set the instalation folder in /media/something , it will pop up a message "New Steam library folder must be on a filesystem mounted with execute permission" – João Carlos Oct 2 '15 at 16:41
  • That will vary from game to game. – Daniel Oct 2 '15 at 16:43
  • I see. By any chance, do you know any way to let Steam install games in the windows partition? (from Ubuntu) – João Carlos Oct 2 '15 at 16:55
  • You could move Steam's folder to the windows partition, and then cd to where it's supposed to be, then use ln -s to make a link to it. – Daniel Oct 2 '15 at 17:01
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Windows Subsystem for Linux seems like a great answer to your problem. You don't even need the Ubuntu partition anymore.

Note: You need to have Windows 10 Anniversary edition or newer.

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