5

I'm having quite a lot of troubles in making a Kingston DT SE9 G2 work again.

It does not show on Windows (both in external devices and disk manager), but it appears here on Ubuntu.

However, whenever I click on it, it says

Impossible to use «usb-Kingston_DataTraveler_3.0_94DE80724792BF1069B340C6-0:0»

and

mount: only root can mount /dev/sdb on /mnt/usb-Kingston_DataTraveler_3.0_94DE80724792BF1069B340C6-0:0

Disk manager shows it, both its name, storage capacity and serial number, but it is only displayed as read only, so I can't really do anything with it.

Gparted doesn't allow me to do anything with it, too (the drive doesn't even appear there).

I tried everything, testdisk, mounting it, but all I am getting is a bunch of errors, permission denied on dd and broken partition tables.

Is there anything else I should try/do?

This is the lsblk output:

simone@Clarence:~$ lsblk
NAME   MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda      8:0    0 223,6G  0 disk 
├─sda1   8:1    0   350M  0 part /media/simone/System reserves
├─sda2   8:2    0 203,7G  0 part /media/simone/044E2DEE4E2DD966
├─sda3   8:3    0     1K  0 part 
├─sda4   8:4    0  18,1G  0 part /
└─sda5   8:5    0   1,4G  0 part [SWAP]
sdb      8:16   1  29,3G  1 disk
sr0     11:0    1  1024M  0 rom

Said device happens to be /dev/sdb

Libparted output:

libparted : 2.3
======================

(gpartedbin:2811): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 7 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:2811): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 6 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:2811): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 26 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:2811): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 25 was not found when attempting to remove it
Unable to open /dev/sdb read-write (Read-only file system). /dev/sdb has been opened read-only.
Unable to open /dev/sdb read-write (Read-only file system). /dev/sdb has been opened read-only.
/dev/sdb: unrecognized disk label

And here's sudo parted -l /dev/sdb output:

simone@Clarence:~$ sudo parted -l /dev/sdb
[sudo] password for simone: 
Model: ATA KINGSTON SV300S3 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 240GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition table: msdos

 Number  Start  End    Size        Type      File system     Flag
 1      1049kB  368MB  367MB       primary   ntfs            avvio
 2      368MB   219GB  219GB       primary   ntfs
 3      219GB   221GB  1499MB      extended
 5      219GB   221GB  1499MB      logical   linux-swap(v1)
 4      221GB   240GB  19,5GB      primary   ext4


 Warning: unable to open /dev/sdb read-write (Read-only file system). /dev/sdb has been opened read-only.
 Error: /dev/sdb: unrecognized disk label  
  • Can you identify it using lsblk? If you can, try running sudo gparted /dev/sdX, where sdX is the drive as listed on lsblk's output; if you can't, please edit your question and add the output of lsblk to it – kos Sep 10 '15 at 16:53
  • Hey, kos, thanks for your reply! As you see I've edited my post. Since it shows there i tried going with gparted as you suggested, but with no luck: – Simone Sep 10 '15 at 17:26
  • This is the output (part 1) ====================== libparted : 2.3 ====================== (gpartedbin:2811): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 7 was not found when attempting to remove it (gpartedbin:2811): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 6 was not found when attempting to remove it – Simone Sep 10 '15 at 17:31
  • (part 2) (gpartedbin:2811): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 26 was not found when attempting to remove it (gpartedbin:2811): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 25 was not found when attempting to remove it Unable to open /dev/sdb read-write (Read-only File System). /dev/sdb hhas been opened read-only. Unable to open /dev/sdbread-write (Read-only File System). /dev/sdb has been opened read-only. /dev/sdb: unrecognized disk label – Simone Sep 10 '15 at 17:31
  • 3
    Does that device maybe have a physical write-protection switch? Look for little buttons or sliders on the case. – Byte Commander Sep 10 '15 at 18:51
3

What you've got is a broken USB key. Most of the time on brand names, the memory cells go first whereas with cheap brands it's the control circuit that goes first.

You've got a prime example of memory cell fatigue. Just throw the key away and buy a new one. I would advise you to buy an SLC USB key. I've got an 8GB Kingston Data Traveller that is still working after 8-9 years now...

Granted, I only use it as a lubuntu boot disk to disinfect Windows computers, but it's still fast and works flawlessly.

SLC ones are about 2* more expensive then MLC ones, but they're 4-8 times as fast and last 4-8 times as long. They're really SSDs on a stick!

Sorry to be the harbinger of bad news!

|improve this answer|||||
  • As you're a reputation 16 user: If this answer helped you, don't forget to click the grey at the left of this text, which means Yes, this answer is valid! ;-) – Fabby Sep 11 '15 at 11:07
  • damnit, into the trash it goes I guess. Thanks for the reply – Simone Sep 11 '15 at 13:23
  • BTW do you happen to know what the chances are that this happened because of unsafe drive ejecting? – Simone Sep 11 '15 at 13:28
  • 1
    As USB sticks don't contain any moveable parts: ridiculously low... – Fabby Sep 11 '15 at 14:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.