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I have an Ubuntu 14.04 desktop that I want to use like a fileserver to share data on my office. I have three desktops using KUbuntu 15.04 that must access the files. I install samba using the instructions give on Ubuntu official docs. But whatever I do in my smb config file users cannot access the share and are asked for username and password. You can find here the output for my testparm -s command:

Load smb config files from /etc/samba/smb.conf
rlimit_max: increasing rlimit_max (1024) to minimum Windows limit (16384)
Processing section "[SHARES]"
Loaded services file OK.
Server role: ROLE_STANDALONE
[global]
    workgroup = MYGROUP
    server string = Samba Server
    map to guest = Bad User
    username map = /etc/samba/smbusers
    log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m
    max log size = 50
    dns proxy = No
    idmap config * : backend = tdb
    read only = No
    create mask = 0755
    guest ok = Yes

[SHARES]
    path = /srv/samba/share
    valid users = cyber03

You can also check my smb.conf file here :

Load smb config files from /etc/samba/smb.conf
rlimit_max: increasing rlimit_max (1024) to minimum Windows limit (16384)
Processing section "[SHARES]"
Loaded services file OK.
Server role: ROLE_STANDALONE
[global]
    workgroup = MYGROUP
    server string = Samba Server
    map to guest = Bad User
    username map = /etc/samba/smbusers
    log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m
    max log size = 50
    dns proxy = No
    idmap config * : backend = tdb
    read only = No
    create mask = 0755
    guest ok = Yes

[SHARES]
    path = /srv/samba/share
    valid users = cyber03
Load smb config files from /etc/samba/smb.conf
rlimit_max: increasing rlimit_max (1024) to minimum Windows limit (16384)
Processing section "[SHARES]"
Loaded services file OK.
Server role: ROLE_STANDALONE
[global]
    workgroup = MYGROUP
    server string = Samba Server
    map to guest = Bad User
    username map = /etc/samba/smbusers
    log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m
    max log size = 50
    dns proxy = No
    idmap config * : backend = tdb
    read only = No
    create mask = 0755
    guest ok = Yes

[SHARES]
    path = /srv/samba/share
    valid users = cyber03
Load smb config files from /etc/samba/smb.conf
rlimit_max: increasing rlimit_max (1024) to minimum Windows limit (16384)
Processing section "[SHARES]"
Loaded services file OK.
Server role: ROLE_STANDALONE
[global]
    workgroup = MYGROUP
    server string = Samba Server
    map to guest = Bad User
    username map = /etc/samba/smbusers
    log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m
    max log size = 50
    dns proxy = No
    idmap config * : backend = tdb
    read only = No
    create mask = 0755
    guest ok = Yes

[SHARES]
    path = /srv/samba/share
    valid users = cyber03
# NOTE: Whenever you modify this file you should run the command testparm
# to check that you have not many any basic syntactic errors.
#
#======================= Global Settings =====================================
[global]

# workgroup = NT-Domain-Name or Workgroup-Name, eg: REDHAT4
   workgroup = MYGROUP

# server string is the equivalent of the NT Description field
   server string = Samba Server

# This option is important for security. It allows you to restrict
# connections to machines which are on your local network. The
# following example restricts access to two C class networks and
# the "loopback" interface. For more examples of the syntax see
# the smb.conf man page
;   hosts allow = 192.168.1. 192.168.2. 127.
   server string = Samba Server

# This option is important for security. It allows you to restrict
# connections to machines which are on your local network. The
# following example restricts access to two C class networks and
# the "loopback" interface. For more examples of the syntax see
# the smb.conf man page
;   hosts allow = 192.168.1. 192.168.2. 127.

# If you want to automatically load your printer list rather
# than setting them up individually then you'll need this
;   load printers = yes

# you may wish to override the location of the printcap file
;   printcap name = /etc/printcap

# on SystemV system setting printcap name to lpstat should allow
# you to automatically obtain a printer list from the SystemV spool
# system
# than setting them up individually then you'll need this
;   load printers = yes

# you may wish to override the location of the printcap file
;   printcap name = /etc/printcap

# on SystemV system setting printcap name to lpstat should allow
# you to automatically obtain a printer list from the SystemV spool
# system
;   printcap name = lpstat

# It should not be necessary to specify the print system type unless
# it is non-standard. Currently supported print systems include:
# bsd, sysv, plp, lprng, aix, hpux, qnx
;   printing = bsd

# Uncomment this if you want a guest account, you must add this to /etc/passwd
# otherwise the user nobody is used
;  guest account = pcguest

# this tells Samba to use a separate log file for each machine
# that connects
   log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m

# Put a capping on the size of the log files (in Kb).
   max log size = 50

# Security mode. Most people will want user level security. See
# security_level.txt for details.
# this tells Samba to use a separate log file for each machine
# that connects
   log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m

# Put a capping on the size of the log files (in Kb).
   max log size = 50

# Security mode. Most people will want user level security. See
# security_level.txt for details.
   security = user
   username map = /etc/samba/smbusers

# Use password server option only with security = server
# The argument list may include:
#   password server = My_PDC_Name [My_BDC_Name] [My_Next_BDC_Name]
# or to auto-locate the domain controller/s
#   password server = *
;   password server = <NT-Server-Name>

# this tells Samba to use a separate log file for each machine
# that connects
   log file = /usr/local/samba/var/log.%m

# Put a capping on the size of the log files (in Kb).
   max log size = 50

# Security mode. Most people will want user level security. See
# security_level.txt for details.
   security = user
   username map = /etc/samba/smbusers

# Use password server option only with security = server
# The argument list may include:
#   password server = My_PDC_Name [My_BDC_Name] [My_Next_BDC_Name]
# or to auto-locate the domain controller/s
#   password server = *
;   password server = <NT-Server-Name>
# of the machine that is connecting
;   include = /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf.%m

# Most people will find that this option gives better performance.
# See speed.txt and the manual pages for details
# You may want to add the following on a Linux system:
#         SO_RCVBUF=8192 SO_SNDBUF=8192
   socket options = TCP_NODELAY

# Configure Samba to use multiple interfaces
# If you have multiple network interfaces then you must list them
# here. See the man page for details.
;   interfaces = 192.168.12.2/24 192.168.13.2/24

# Browser Control Options:
# set local master to no if you don't want Samba to become a master
# browser on your network. Otherwise the normal election rules apply
;   local master = no

# OS Level determines the precedence of this server in master browser
# elections. The default value should be reasonable
;   os level = 33

# Domain Master specifies Samba to be the Domain Master Browser. This
# allows Samba to collate browse lists between subnets. Don't use this
# if you already have a Windows NT domain controller doing this job
;   domain master = yes

# Preferred Master causes Samba to force a local browser election on startup
# and gives it a slightly higher chance of winning the election
;   preferred master = yes

# Enable this if you want Samba to be a domain logon server for
# Windows95 workstations.
;   domain logons = yes

# if you enable domain logons then you may want a per-machine or
# per user logon script
# run a specific logon batch file per workstation (machine)
;   logon script = %m.bat
# run a specific logon batch file per username
;   logon script = %U.bat

# Where to store roving profiles (only for Win95 and WinNT)
#        %L substitutes for this servers netbios name, %U is username
#        You must uncomment the [Profiles] share below
;   logon path = \\%L\Profiles\%U

# Windows Internet Name Serving Support Section:
# WINS Support - Tells the NMBD component of Samba to enable it's WINS Server
;   wins support = yes

# WINS Server - Tells the NMBD components of Samba to be a WINS Client
#       Note: Samba can be either a WINS Server, or a WINS Client, but NOT both
;   wins server = w.x.y.z

# WINS Proxy - Tells Samba to answer name resolution queries on
# behalf of a non WINS capable client, for this to work there must be
# at least one  WINS Server on the network. The default is NO.
;   wins proxy = yes

# DNS Proxy - tells Samba whether or not to try to resolve NetBIOS names
# via DNS nslookups. The built-in default for versions 1.9.17 is yes,
# this has been changed in version 1.9.18 to no.
   dns proxy = no
   map to guest = bad user

#============================ Share Definitions ==============================
; [homes]
;   comment = Home Directories
;   browseable = no
;   writable = yes

# Un-comment the following and create the netlogon directory for Domain Logons
; [netlogon]
;   comment = Network Logon Service
;   path = /usr/local/samba/lib/netlogon
;   guest ok = yes
;   writable = no
;   share modes = no

# Un-comment the following to provide a specific roving profile share
# the default is to use the user's home directory
;[Profiles]
;    path = /usr/local/samba/profiles
;    browseable = no
;    guest ok = yes
# NOTE: If you have a BSD-style print system there is no need to
# specifically define each individual printer
;[printers]
;   comment = All Printers
;   path = /usr/spool/samba
;   browseable = no
# Set public = yes to allow user 'guest account' to print
;   guest ok = no
;   writable = no
;   printable = yes
# This one is useful for people to share files
;[tmp]
;   comment = Temporary file space
;   path = /tmp
;   read only = no
;   public = yes

# A publicly accessible directory, but read only, except for people in
# the "staff" group
;[public]
;   comment = Public Stuff
;   path = /home/samba
;   public = yes
;   writable = yes
;   printable = no
;   write list = @staff

# Other examples.
# A private printer, usable only by fred. Spool data will be placed in fred's
# home directory. Note that fred must have write access to the spool directory,
# wherever it is.
;[fredsprn]
;   comment = Fred's Printer
;   valid users = fred
;   path = /homes/fred
;   printer = freds_printer
;   public = no
;   writable = no
;   printable = yes

# A private directory, usable only by fred. Note that fred requires write
# access to the directory.
;[fredsdir]
;   comment = Fred's Service
;   path = /usr/somewhere/private
;   valid users = fred
;   public = no
;   writable = yes
;   printable = no

# a service which has a different directory for each machine that connects
# this allows you to tailor configurations to incoming machines. You could
# also use the %U option to tailor it by user name.
# The %m gets replaced with the machine name that is connecting.
;[pchome]
;  comment = PC Directories
;  path = /usr/pc/%m
;  public = no
;   printable = no

# a service which has a different directory for each machine that connects
# this allows you to tailor configurations to incoming machines. You could
# also use the %U option to tailor it by user name.
# The %m gets replaced with the machine name that is connecting.
;[pchome]
;  comment = PC Directories
;  path = /usr/pc/%m
;  public = no
;   printable = no

# a service which has a different directory for each machine that connects
# this allows you to tailor configurations to incoming machines. You could
# also use the %U option to tailor it by user name.
# The %m gets replaced with the machine name that is connecting.
;[pchome]
;  comment = PC Directories
;  path = /usr/pc/%m
;  public = no
;  writable = yes

# A publicly accessible directory, read/write to all users. Note that all files
# created in the directory by users will be owned by the default user, so
# any user with access can delete any other user's files. Obviously this
# directory must be writable by the default user. Another user could of course
# be specified, in which case all files would be owned by that user instead.
;[public]
;   path = /srv/samba/share
;   public = yes
;   only guest = yes
   writable = yes
   printable = no
   browseable = yes
   guest ok = yes
   read only = no
   create mask = 0755

# The following two entries demonstrate how to share a directory so that two
# users can place files there that will be owned by the specific users. In this
# setup, the directory should be writable by both users and should have the
# sticky bit set on it to prevent abuse. Obviously this could be extended to
# as many users as required.
;[myshare]
;   comment = Mary's and Fred's stuff
;   path = /usr/somewhere/shared
;   valid users = mary fred
;   public = no
;   writable = yes
;   printable = no
;   create mask = 0765



[SHARES]
   path = /srv/samba/share
   read only = no
   guest ok = yes
   valid users = cyber03

Thanks a lot.

| improve this question | | | | |
1

One way to go about it would be to map the IP (and set it to static if it is not). This removes the need for login credentials.

Example:

[TV]
path = /media/samba/TV
available = yes
hosts allow = 127.0.0.1 192.168. 10.
hosts deny = 0.0.0.0/0
read only = no
browseable = yes
public = yes
writable = yes

This enables the ENTIRE 192.168.. network and the entire 10...* network, but you can put it as 192.168.1.42. Also I have found issues trying to share samba directories high up the file tree, so I usually make a samba directory and and symlink the folders inside it. But it looks like you already do that, or at least that your samba share folder is low on the file tree.

Since you only have 3 desktops to share to, this should be relatively easy to implement, and if you wanted to share more folders, I would do something like

[Desktop 1]
path = /srv/samba/desktop1/

and symlink directories inside of that folder, that way you can add or delete shares without touching sambas configs!

| improve this answer | | | | |
0

I use a linux machine to move files to several windows machines. After a ubuntu update when I tried to connect to windows machines I am prompted for a password.

The prompt says: Computer Name____________ and under it Password_______. When I put the computer name and password in they don't work.

Solution: The computer name [Robyn] that you find on windows 7 by right clicking "My Computer" or right clicking "This PC" in windows 10 is not it! Instead you need to go to command prompt [start ---->cmd], the prompt will come up saying C:\Users\GeorgiaSalpa>

So in this case when samba asks for "computer name" you put in GeorgiaSalpa and then for "password" you put in the windows computer password, not the password for a particular user.

In my case there was no need to mess with smb.conf and other complicated solutions found in many forums.

| improve this answer | | | | |
-1

Personally I think it would be wise to install Linux Server and use Samba and Webmin.

This is what I do to share files stored in one place. There are loads of tutorials out there that will help, trust me I started with minimal knowledge of Linux, but if not there should be many others who will give a more detailed and less-expansive answer.

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 1
    Please try to answer the question without adding in personal beliefs backed up by personal experience, while this may be true, it would be better suited to a comment. – FreeSoftwareServers Jul 28 '15 at 23:04
  • I understand. But I'm not permitted to post comments due to my reputation being low as I don't usually post. Sorry for the bother. – Eyovin Jul 30 '15 at 0:08
  • Ahh my first post was a Q n A that got taken down for not being clear . and I out a lot of effort in. Don't take it personally I said it for others as much as for you. This is the best site imo for not getting opinions. But answers. – FreeSoftwareServers Jul 31 '15 at 1:57

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