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I have Ubuntu and I got Emacs from the Ubuntu store. My keyboard layout is Latin American.

To type the symbol \, I use AltGr and the ? key and it works in Emacs.

To type the ^ symbol, I use AltGr and the { key everywhere. For some reason this won't work on Emacs. How can I type the ^ character in Emacs?

  • What is your keyboard layout, and what operating system do you use? What version of Emacs are you running and where did you get the binary? What does Emacs say when you press F1 then c then AltGr+} ? – Gilles 'SO- stop being evil' Apr 11 '15 at 19:58
  • It doesn't say anything, I have ubuntu and my keyboard layout is latin american and I got emacs from the ubuntu store. – The Emperor of Ice Cream Apr 11 '15 at 20:02
  • What version of Ubuntu are you using? Don't you see anything in the bottom like when you press F1 then c? What happens if you press AltGr+} then a? – Gilles 'SO- stop being evil' Apr 11 '15 at 20:35
  • Are you running Emacs in a graphical window or a terminal? – Chris Apr 11 '15 at 21:39
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    People should not be voting to close because of the existence of Emacs SE. There is nothing wrong with posting Emacs questions to StackOverflow. There is also nothing wrong with informing users that Emacs SE exists. But posting an Emacs question here is not a reason to close the question. – Drew Apr 12 '15 at 0:44
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Usually, in Latin & other international keyboard layouts, if you type an accent prefix (known as "dead key") followed by the spacebar, you get the accent symbol itself.

For example, to get a circumflex accent you type ^A to get â, and if you type ^<space> you get ^.

In the Latin layout, you should have a key with { [ ^ symbols, so the ^ should use an Alt or AltGr key. Try to type that followed by space.

The same applies to ~ and other accents.

  • You can get a similar result by hitting the accent key twice. – juanleon Apr 13 '15 at 4:36

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