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I've been using Clonezilla for weekly image backups, which is obviously a little bit of a hassle. I've been trying to switch to dd, so I can have cron run it for me.

This is what my backup script looks like:

#!/bin/bash
#dd whole drive
dd if=/dev/sda of=/media/temp/image/"image-$(date +"%Y-%m-%d").img"

I ended up with a 256gb img file, and decided to give it a test run. I booted from the Ubuntu 14.10 live USB stick, mounted the remote filesystem, and ran the following:

sudo -i
dd if=/media/temp/image/image-2015-04-04.img of=/dev/sda

Upon rebooting, the system hangs at the "Ubuntu" logo screen. I'm unable to switch to tty1, ctrl+alt+del, or anything. I then restored from my Clonezilla backup (which was made immediately before the dd backup), and it worked fine.

What am I doing wrong? Should I just ditch dd and take a different route?

  • I think clonezilla is a more efficient way then dd. – mikewhatever Apr 5 '15 at 12:11
  • It's much more space efficient, but to my knowledge, I can't schedule it and run it while my OS is running. – Big Millz Apr 5 '15 at 12:14
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    Have you run the first script from a system running on /dev/sda? – UTF-8 Apr 5 '15 at 12:22
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    Well, there is the problem. You need to do it from a live CD/USB to avoid filesystem corruption. – mikewhatever Apr 5 '15 at 13:19
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    @DavidFoerster Happy to oblige. – mikewhatever Apr 6 '15 at 7:46
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In order to avoid filesystem corruption, you need to run dd from a Live CD/USB. This ensures that the filesystem you copy does not change while dd copies it.

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