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In OSX there is this restart and resume feature, that makes every window of every application (that supports this feature) resume after a system reboot, even unsaved new documents, mails, images etc.

I wonder, if and how it is possible to imitate this feature on an Ubuntu system. There is tuxonice but I am not quite sure if that actually does what I want.

To clarify, I am not talking about hibernating or suspend to disk. After a true reboot and even after hard resetting the machine everything is back as before. I use it with TextEdit to hold notes a lot, but also with unfinished emails in Mail. It would be really cool to have this on Ubuntu as well.

Any ideas?

  • I'd love this for Ubuntu Mate also. It's essentially like "suspend" where you can turn on the computer and it remembers everything that was open.. well why not the same but remember after reboot. – Turgs Jan 2 '18 at 1:25
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This worked for me when connecting remotely to a machine and logging in/out. Will test in a few hours at home with a full reboot, will edit with my findings

I also found this which seems to do exactly the same.

I have never thought about this feature before and glad you brought it up!

EDIT
I run Gnome 3 and wasn't able to find the setting as mentioned in the first article
The second article also didn't work for me

EDIT 2
Neither article worked for me in Ubuntu 14.04 using Unity or Gnome 3

  • This restores the running applications but it certainly does not restore any unsaved files. Instead, when shutting down, pluma for example prevented the shutdown with a "save me first" dialog. Thats more like the opposite of what I want. Upvote for at least restoring apps, though. – mcnesium Mar 24 '15 at 13:27
  • I don't think that is possible unless the app supports it directly. Glad it helped somewhat – Frozenfire Mar 24 '15 at 16:20

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