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I have two distros installed in my PC: Ubuntu and Xubuntu (Not counting Windows that is.) I created a partition for ubuntu with swap and home partitions first.

I didn't realized when I created the partitions for the second distro (Xubuntu) that I didn't create a HOME partition. Now when start in Ubuntu or Xubuntu, I can't save files to my HOME folder.

1.Do I need to create another HOME partion for Xubuntu? Also, I didn't know if I had to create a second swap partition but I did it anaway.

2. What would be the best way to create partitions for these two distros?

3. Can i just share the HOME partition, if so, HOW?

Since I can't add images here yet, please see a screenshot here.

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    Ubuntu and Xubuntu are really just different default packages for the same distro. If you install them on separate partitions, then there'd be a lot of redundancy in the packages. It'd be better to install Ubuntu, then XFCE within it. Alternatively, I think you can install Xubuntu, then Unity with it. (Two distros is something like Arch Linux + Ubuntu, which is what I have. This really has to be in two partitions, since they put files in different places.) – Sparhawk Feb 17 '15 at 4:55
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    Although you can share home you are best off sharing a data partition. – Panther Feb 17 '15 at 4:56
  • Thanks for your reply Sparhawk. I'm currently learning the 2 distr0s. My direction now is to learn HOW TO do the situations I asked about. Basically, I want to know HOW TO either separate the home folder in two or just create a separate one for each OS. I know they are both diffent that's why I want to keep both separated by their own OS and perhaps shared by the same data or home partition. That's all. I just need direction on how to do it. – LittleTIME Feb 17 '15 at 5:46
  • /home does not need to be on its own partition. For the system that you created without /home partition, the /home directory will just be on the / root partition – noleti Feb 17 '15 at 6:11
  • I agree with @Sparhawk but only if this is NOT about testing different operating systems and their desktop. If this is just about getting to know XFCE and to see if it is something you want to use in favor of Unity I would keep those systems separate. Otherwise I would install XFCE inside Ubuntu and choose the desktop during login. – Rinzwind Feb 17 '15 at 7:51
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  1. Do I need to create another HOME partion for Xubuntu? Also, I didn't know if I had to create a second swap partition but I did it anaway.

    I would use different /home/ for each operating system. You never know if you run into a problem where 2 files are named the same but do something different between 2 different operating systems.

    It is perfectly possible to use 1 swap.

  2. What would be the best way to create partitions for these two distros?

    I'll answer that with 3. Though I object to "best"... There is no "best" way. There are several methods but any of these methods is fine. It also depens on what you use your machine for.

  3. Can i just share the HOME partition, if so, HOW?

    Yes but I would not do that with /home/ itself. Why not put the directories om a different partition and mount that partition in to all of your operating systems? Like so...

    Ubuntu: /root
    Ubuntu: swap
    Ubuntu: /home/user/ 
    xUbuntu: /root
    xUbuntu: swap
    xUbuntu: /home/user/
    /discworld/Pictures
    /discworld/Downloads
    /discworld/...
    

    and then symlink /discworld/ or the directories in /discworld/ into /home/user/

    • You can also skip a separate /home/ and have that as part of /. Saves you about 10Gb per /home/.
    • You can also skip adding more than 1 swap if you want.

    The general idea is that you do not use /home/user/ and store all your date elsewhere (and that elsewhere can be used on any system). It then does not matter if xUbuntu uses a different set of directories: you just add them all to that partition.

I have had experience with sharing Redhat, Suse and Ubuntu with 1 /home/ and we quickly decided that a /home/ per operating system and a big datapartition works a lot better. If you consider backup: you backup that partition and have all the important data. All the other can be recreated with a re-install. If you use it as a server all you need to do is point the data dir for MySQL to that partition and for apache set up the virtual sites to that partition. And maybe create a script that copies all the config files to the partition (so those are backupped too).

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