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I'm relatively new to programming as a whole and some tutorials have been telling me to use ls -l to look at files in a directory and others have been saying ll. I know that ls is a short list, but is there a difference between the other two?

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  • You can inspect how your *sh shell interprets any command with type [command]. type ll results in ll is aliased to 'ls -alF' in my setup. Commented Mar 1, 2015 at 0:13

2 Answers 2

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This is located in your .bashrc:

alias ll='ls -al'

By taking a look at the manual pages for the command ls, you can see what those two attributes accomplish together:

  1. -a: do not ignore entries starting with ..
  2. -l: use a long listing format.

So you can understand that ls -l would ignore any entry starting with .. That's their only difference.

EDIT:

Let me note, that, as commented, the ll alias differs from installation to installation. In case you are wondering what's yours, please open up a terminal and enter:

alias ll

This will show you how ll is set. You can then look up the additional attributes by typing:

man ls
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    I have ll is aliased to 'ls -l'... The alias is copied over from the skeleton files so what people have depends on when they installed.
    – Oli
    Commented Feb 4, 2015 at 9:57
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    I have ls='ls --color=auto', ll='ls -lh'. Ubuntu 14.04 ships /etc/skel/.bashrc with ls='ls --color=auto' ll='ls -alF, but that's horrible. I use ll when I want sizes/dates/perms, ll -a if I also want dotfiles. Commented Feb 4, 2015 at 19:21
  • I also use alias l=ll, handy in case I miss a key. Commented Feb 4, 2015 at 19:25
  • I've got alias ll = ls -alF if this helps anyone.
    – user323419
    Commented Feb 4, 2015 at 20:15
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    For your explanation of -a, you might want to put . in backticks so it's more visible.
    – cpast
    Commented Feb 5, 2015 at 5:50
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ll is a common alias for ls -l. It is a part of the default .bashrc, with a couple more options:

$ grep 'alias ll' /etc/skel/.bashrc
alias ll='ls -alF'

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